DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   SW Duration paint - OK to thin with water? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/sw-duration-paint-ok-thin-water-10549/)

plin321 08-08-2007 11:19 PM

SW Duration paint - OK to thin with water?
 
I just hired a contractor to paint my house. I had purchased Duration exterior latex in advance. The contractor wasn't familiar with Duration and thinned it with water, probably by 15-20%. The label, which he didn't bother to read, clearly says "do not thin". I probably should have reminded him not to thin it beforehand.

He also thinned the SW A100 primer I supplied, and as a result, he had to use a lot more of the (thinned) Duration to get a decent coverage.

I'm wondering if the paint has been compromised and if the benefits of Duration are now gone, compared to a cheaper paint. Would it help to add some unthinned paint to it to thicken it up? Or perhaps SW sells some kind of concentrated paint to use as a thickening agent?

Or can this problem be solved by just applying an extra coat? I just hope I didn't waste a thousand bucks on paint ;)

The good news is that he only did the eaves and one wall so far. The bad news is I may have wasted some $$$ on paint :(

Da Vinci 08-09-2007 12:53 AM

Some of these ultra high end paints are very thick, and a little water helps it spread better (especially if it's hot when applying), although 15-20% is excessive to me.

BAy Area Painting Contractor

poppameth 08-09-2007 06:52 AM

15-20% is excessive. Usually you want no more than an ounce or two per gallon. Floetrol would have been a better choice. If it's anything like P&L Accolade, and I've heard it is, then thinning a little is almost a must to work with the stuff.

gshock 08-09-2007 07:35 AM

I concur with Da Vinci and Poppameth. Using something like Floetrol is a good way to work with the paint, but thinning with that much water is like wasting money. They make stuff like Floetrol for the simple reason that it improves workability without compromising the integrity of the paint.

sirwired 08-09-2007 11:01 AM

Just as a random side-note, next time you hire a contractor, you probably want to ask ahead of time if they have experience working with your preferred paint. Each contractor will have their own preferred brand and line of paint, and you don't want to be the test-subject for a painter exploring a new paint. In addition, a contractor that uses your preferred paint often can get a much better price on it than you can.

Alternatively, pick a quality contractor and ask him/her to use premium paint of their choosing. There isn't THAT much difference between top-of-the-line BM, SW, Duron, California, Porter, etc., quality-wise. Many/most painters will prefer a particular brand, and there is no reason to "fight" them on it. While the paint may be of similar quality, different premium lines go on differently. (Oh, and if their preferred paint is Behr or American Tradition, you probably want to find a new contractor.)

SirWired

Workaholic 08-09-2007 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poppameth (Post 56923)
15-20% is excessive. Usually you want no more than an ounce or two per gallon. Floetrol would have been a better choice. If it's anything like P&L Accolade, and I've heard it is, then thinning a little is almost a must to work with the stuff.

I agree that floetrol would of been a much better thinning choice. Also i totaly agree that those paints are rather thick and in this weather it needed to be thinned a little bit

plin321 08-09-2007 10:13 PM

I worked it out with the painter. He admitted his mistake in not
reading the label and the reason he thinned it was because he was
using a smaller tip size on his sprayer than what SW suggests for
Duration.


He agreed to deduct the cost of the new paint required from his bill.
I'm still out by a few gallons, however, because the rest of the paint
and primer he thinned is is pretty much worthless. I'll take this as a
learning experience and will always check contractors' references and
see some of their work in the future.
Anyone want to buy some duration paint at a great price? ;)

Da Vinci 08-09-2007 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Workaholic (Post 57013)
I agree that floetrol would of been a much better thinning choice. Also i totaly agree that those paints are rather thick and in this weather it needed to be thinned a little bit

Floetrol is best when possible for sure, but I've found with these "sticky" paints that floetrol doesn't always improve the flow- that's why I recommend a little water in this situation- just to cut the stickiness.

Bay Area Painting Company

poppameth 08-10-2007 06:55 AM

True. Last I worked with Accolade I added equal parts water and Floetrol, but not too much of either one.

joewho 08-11-2007 03:16 AM

Duration is a little harder to work with, especially outside. Just rinsing the brush helps avoid thinning. If working from an open pot for a while, I thin to compensate evaporation.

Workaholic 08-11-2007 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Da Vinci (Post 57074)
Floetrol is best when possible for sure, but I've found with these "sticky" paints that floetrol doesn't always improve the flow- that's why I recommend a little water in this situation- just to cut the stickiness.

Bay Area Painting Company

That sounds like a good tip. Thanks


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:03 AM.