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Old 05-19-2012, 09:34 PM   #1
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stucco


hello i am sure glad there is a site like this.well we bought our house 2 years ago and it looked great,but now the paint is peeling off the stucco like a snake shedding its skin.neighbor's say it was just painted before we bought it.stucco is in great shape,where do i start wash,prime,paint-help.no idea on the paint used and looks like it was not primed.

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Old 05-20-2012, 06:49 PM   #2
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I suspect somebody slapped bargain paint on to sell the thing. You should, being careful not to go crazy with the pressure, use a pressure washer to get all the flaking paint off. Then you should probably at least spot prime. Apply a coat or two of paint store, not box store, 100 percent acrylic latex house paint.

Watch the surface temperature on stucco too. It stores heat and you may have to cool it down or the paint will not stick. Garden hose and water sprayed on areas you are approaching to work on will do the trick. Just make sure it dries.

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Old 05-20-2012, 09:52 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by silver12 View Post
hello i am sure glad there is a site like this.well we bought our house 2 years ago and it looked great,but now the paint is peeling off the stucco like a snake shedding its skin.neighbor's say it was just painted before we bought it.stucco is in great shape,where do i start wash,prime,paint-help.no idea on the paint used and looks like it was not primed.
Hi Ho Silver...

Stucco should be an easy surface to paint...should be. As is with any job, surface prep is the most important step in painting a surface, and stucco is no exception. The problem with stucco is not everybody knows what the necessary surface prep is. Stucco is a highly absorbent, muti-faceted, alkaline surface that's kinda hard to acid wash to neutralize, or scrub to remove dirt, or other foreign matter because of the texture. Power washing does a pretty good job of removing loose dirt and paint, but can, often times, expose the loosely bound granular make up of stucco that inhibits adhesion...

Now, top all that off with the fact that high quality exterior latex paints, nor conventional latex primers, just don't have enough resin to penetrate and seal stucco - and - bind both pigment and whatever loose stucco material there may be - and still provide enough surface film to provide adequate protection from the elements and keep rain from penetrating beneath the surface...which is probably what has happened to the last coat of paint applied.

Not all is lost though...My recommendation is to remove all loose paint, dirt, laitence, and/or foreign matter by power washing. After this step, inspect for mildew and remove by spraying affected surface with a solution of household bleach and water, and follow with a good soaking rinse of clean water. After the surface has dried, any noticeable slag staining should be spot primed with an acrylic rust-inhibitive primer.

Next, instead of using a house paint primer (many manufacturers don't necessarily recommend a primer for stucco anyway), apply 1 coat of a clear acrylic masonry sealer (there are several on the market, my favorite is Seal Krete). The application of this "all-vehicle" type of sealer (a) binds the loose granular masonry tightly to the surface, (b) provides a "barrier" coat between the stucco and an alkali sensitive coating, (c) limits penetration of the finish coat into the absorbent stucco (remember, latex does not need to penetrate for excellent adhesion), and (d) provides additional water repellency to the surface...and because of (c), it is not necessary to wet down the stucco during application of finish product.

Then finish with 1 or 2 coats of a high quality flat latex house paint - In your specific situation, it won't absolutely be necessary to choose a solid acrylic top coat - an acrylic/vinyl-acrylic blend will work very, and last for many years. NOTE: If there is extensive cracking, or noticeable "freeze/thaw" damage on your stucco (not un-typical), you may want to consider using an elastomeric paint, or a high quality latex house paint with an elastomeric element such as SW Duration...These type of products can be great on stucco, but sometimes be a little more difficult to apply - talk to your local independent paint dealer for his/her recommendation before considering such a product. Good luck, and I hope this info is more helpful than confusing.
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Old 05-21-2012, 05:22 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by ric knows paint View Post
Hi Ho Silver...

Stucco should be an easy surface to paint...should be. As is with any job, surface prep is the most important step in painting a surface, and stucco is no exception. The problem with stucco is not everybody knows what the necessary surface prep is. Stucco is a highly absorbent, muti-faceted, alkaline surface that's kinda hard to acid wash to neutralize, or scrub to remove dirt, or other foreign matter because of the texture. Power washing does a pretty good job of removing loose dirt and paint, but can, often times, expose the loosely bound granular make up of stucco that inhibits adhesion...

Now, top all that off with the fact that high quality exterior latex paints, nor conventional latex primers, just don't have enough resin to penetrate and seal stucco - and - bind both pigment and whatever loose stucco material there may be - and still provide enough surface film to provide adequate protection from the elements and keep rain from penetrating beneath the surface...which is probably what has happened to the last coat of paint applied.

Not all is lost though...My recommendation is to remove all loose paint, dirt, laitence, and/or foreign matter by power washing. After this step, inspect for mildew and remove by spraying affected surface with a solution of household bleach and water, and follow with a good soaking rinse of clean water. After the surface has dried, any noticeable slag staining should be spot primed with an acrylic rust-inhibitive primer.

Next, instead of using a house paint primer (many manufacturers don't necessarily recommend a primer for stucco anyway), apply 1 coat of a clear acrylic masonry sealer (there are several on the market, my favorite is Seal Krete). The application of this "all-vehicle" type of sealer (a) binds the loose granular masonry tightly to the surface, (b) provides a "barrier" coat between the stucco and an alkali sensitive coating, (c) limits penetration of the finish coat into the absorbent stucco (remember, latex does not need to penetrate for excellent adhesion), and (d) provides additional water repellency to the surface...and because of (c), it is not necessary to wet down the stucco during application of finish product.

Then finish with 1 or 2 coats of a high quality flat latex house paint - In your specific situation, it won't absolutely be necessary to choose a solid acrylic top coat - an acrylic/vinyl-acrylic blend will work very, and last for many years. NOTE: If there is extensive cracking, or noticeable "freeze/thaw" damage on your stucco (not un-typical), you may want to consider using an elastomeric paint, or a high quality latex house paint with an elastomeric element such as SW Duration...These type of products can be great on stucco, but sometimes be a little more difficult to apply - talk to your local independent paint dealer for his/her recommendation before considering such a product. Good luck, and I hope this info is more helpful than confusing.

laitence, what is this?
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Old 05-21-2012, 06:48 AM   #5
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laitence, what is this?
Laitance is a thin, often un-seen, lime deposit, or film, on concrete/masonry surfaces and is usually the result of a too watery mix of concrete or the evaporation of water in the mix has been challenged by atmospheric conditions, such as high humidity, rain, extreme cold, etc. Laitance is pretty common, is relatively harmless to concrete, is highly alkaline and considered too "hot" or "green" to paint (at least with conventional coatings), and is just 1 of the reasons for etching concrete before painting. Without etching, laitance may, or may not, be washed from a concrete/masonry surface over time by rain...but since it's un-seen, and stucco has so many textural nooks and crannies to harbor lime, dirt, or any other crud that'd keep paint from adhering as it's supposed to, why take the chance that, just because of age and exposure to rain, the issue is no longer a threat to a successful paint job?
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