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-   -   Strong ammonia smell with Glidden 2in1 (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/strong-ammonia-smell-glidden-2in1-121072/)

misswoosie 10-23-2011 09:50 PM

Strong ammonia smell with Glidden 2in1
 
Made the mistake of buying some Glidden 2n1 brilliance exterior paint-semi gloss.
I say mistake because I don't think I have ever used such an awful paint. Was painting a white front door red. Already on 3 rd coat and still don't have a consistent color or finish.
I am not a professional, but have done a fair amount of painting in my time.
It does not self level at all and dries far too quickly.

I have come to the decison that I will have to re-prep the door and paint with another paint.

However my biggest concern was the very strong smell of ammonia or peroxide coming from the paint tin as soon as I opened it.Glidden claim is low VOC. At one point my eyes were burning and the morning after I applied the first coat I awoke with awful sinus pain and a headache.

Is this normal, or have I somehow got a bad batch?

jsheridan 10-24-2011 06:13 AM

Welcome Misswoosie, Ammonia is not an uncommon smell with paint. While ammonia can be toxic, I don't believe it is considered a VOC by government. Low or zero VOC doesn't mean non-toxic. "Green" paints are still very poisonous, they just don't emit certain supposed polluting organic compounds their ancestors did. Organic compounds, by definition, contain carbon. Hydrocarbons are the "villian". Ammonia doesn't contain carbon. If you contact Glidden, they could probably answer your question better.
Joe

Brushjockey 10-24-2011 06:23 AM

I've never used Glidden top coats. The only thing I get from box stores are primers. Many of them have the strong ammonia smell because the ammonia helps adhesion by cutting into the surface.
There are much better finish coats at a real paint store. Many good choices.
And might be better in the future to use a real primer, then a real paint' 2 products that do each function best.

misswoosie 10-24-2011 06:45 AM

Thanks.
Actually it does say that when tinted it contains etyhlene glycol (antifreeze) which I believe is an organic compound, although obviously this isn't responsible for the strong odor.
I've never noticed such a strong,offensive smell of ammonia with any paint before, either here or in the UK. Oil based paint smell is much preferable to the overpowering ammonia smell from this paint.
I guess the culprit ingredient is peroxidisulfuric (disulphuric) acid.

I have contacted Glidden.

Brushjockey 10-24-2011 06:54 AM

At the moment all paints except a few lines at Benj Moore use glycol based tints.
And those paints are a new generation and are excellent.

misswoosie 10-24-2011 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 755406)
I've never used Glidden top coats. The only thing I get from box stores are primers. Many of them have the strong ammonia smell because the ammonia helps adhesion by cutting into the surface.
There are much better finish coats at a real paint store. Many good choices.
And might be better in the future to use a real primer, then a real paint' 2 products that do each function best.

"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS -

ah ah-agree.
I have only ever used alkyd/oil based paint on exterior doors and windows before, so this was a first for me. In the past have used 2 in 1 paints on interior walls and agree that 2 coats were always needed, which is what I expected really.
Also-it claims to be semi-gloss, but looks VERY high gloss to me.
It wouldn't seem to "stick" and was impossible to apply without brush strokes showing, no matter what size/quality brush I used or how much paint I put on the brush. I tried not overspreading/brushing and then the opposite.
Can I apply an alkyd paint over the top of this acrylic paint, after I sand down the mess I'm left with?
I understand that there are more expensive/better quality paints out there, but have used valspar paints before-the high definition, for interior walls and had good results.
This was $16 for a quart. How much would a similar paint in SW or BM paint cost? We have an ACE harware right beside us.

misswoosie 10-24-2011 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 755423)
At the moment all paints except a few lines at Benj Moore use glycol based tints.
And those paints are a new generation and are excellent.

Is this the natura range?
On the BM site when I search for stores it's not bringing up any ACE harware stores at all, so I can't see if it's stocked.

So annoyed-my parents are arriving from England today and instead of a nice new red front door they have an eyesore!

Snav 10-24-2011 07:50 AM

What's likely occurring is a chemical interaction between your existing door paint/coating - and your new paint/coating.

Ammonia's harm comes from it's fumes, not it's liquid form - and when the liquidized ammonia is exposed to air it evaporates . . . ammonia fumes rust metal and interact with tannins in wood to deepen the color of a stain that's applied later (so it's used often in woodworking - especially older applications)

If your door at some point was fumed with ammonia or ammonia was applied heavily (like for cleaning purposes) it's likely soaked into the poors and is being released via chemical interaction.

So if I were you I'd:
use paint remover to strip the paint.
Scrub the door with VINEGAR (not hydrochloric acid like i first typed in - oops!)
then soap and water
let dry - start over.

jschaben 10-24-2011 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 755452)
Scrub the door with a hydochloric acid

Is this right:eek:

Will22 10-24-2011 09:36 AM

Ammonia smell in low VOC paints
 
As these products no longer contain solvents or preservatives, ammonia is a drying agent, not a volatile organic compound. Generally this odor dissipates quickly when the product dries. It does not initiate a reaction, and subjecting yourself to a caustic acid is unnecessary.

The Brilliance product sold in Wal Mart is not an economy-grade product, although I realize that some here infer that anything sold in a large retail outlet is sub standard.

Windows 10-24-2011 11:37 AM

Get a quality paint in a color other than red (notoriously bad coverage), and everything will fall into place for you.


(I am amazed at how frequently people fall into the 'short-cut' marketing trap. 'Paint and primer in one', 'one coat coverage', 'pink until it's dry ceiling paint' and more often than not these gimmicks simply adds a layer of complexity to a straight forward project.)

chrisn 10-24-2011 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jschaben (Post 755498)
Is this right:eek:

I hope not:laughing:

Snav 10-24-2011 01:30 PM

:laughing: I meant to say vinegar! :laughing:

Not muriatic acid - that won't help. :laughing:

Oh heavens - so sorry! Don't do that.

jschaben 10-24-2011 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 755740)
:laughing: I meant to say vinegar! :laughing:

Not muriatic acid - that won't help. :laughing:

Oh heavens - so sorry! Don't do that.

acetic acid sounds soooo much better:thumbsup:

Brushjockey 10-24-2011 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by misswoosie (Post 755441)
Is this the natura range?
On the BM site when I search for stores it's not bringing up any ACE harware stores at all, so I can't see if it's stocked.

So annoyed-my parents are arriving from England today and instead of a nice new red front door they have an eyesore!

Natura is one, I think the Aura line both interior and exterior is outstanding- but has a learning curve.
Also there is the Ben line- a mid priced grade- still nice and Regal Select- one small step below Aura in quality.
Aura Rocks red BTW- a hard color to get coverage in in most paints- Aura will almost always get it in 2 .

Qts of Aura retail for 21.99 at my stores


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