Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-12-2013, 05:37 AM   #16
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Share |
Default

Stripping off old paint


The lead thing is somewhat overblown, but it has some reality to it. It is mostly bad for developing children.
Take precautions like cleaning up really well, washing your hands before eating after working on the wood etc.
Death is not at all common so don't stress out.

__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
ToolSeeker (03-12-2013)
Old 03-12-2013, 07:32 PM   #17
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,530
Default

Stripping off old paint


What you did looks great. I admire your persistence. I would never do that for someone else, and the maddening part is that the landlord can make you put it back the way it was when you leave if he's an ass.

Don't worry, you aren't going to die, you might just slur your words a little bit and forget where you are once in a while but nothing serious.

If Joe and I are still alive after the things we've done you have nothing to worry about, about, about.

__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 12:07 PM   #18
Member
 
Mr. Paint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: San Carlos, CA
Posts: 341
Default

Stripping off old paint


The first word in paint is PAIN...
__________________
The Painter's Paint Store where QUALITY is ECONOMY
Mr. Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 12:16 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 51
Default

Stripping off old paint


so i removed main layers of paint. Initially i tried the smart strip but it was weak. I contacted the manufacturer and they recommended the peelaway1.
But, the problem i get is strange discoloration on wood. Should i wait until it dries out and the try to send it? It sucks that after so much work the wood looks like crap, but the paint is gone!!!
I am supposed to do last step to clean the PH levels but this is supposed to be done when all is dry.









blwegrzyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 11:44 AM   #20
Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,141
Default

Stripping off old paint


Just looking over this thread, I'm impressed with your persistence. Looks good!
Now that you have removed all the old paint it should be safer to sand the wood. Washing it first with tsp, or some other lead dust control product would help make sure all the lead is gone. Lead dust is so fine it can be there and not be visible.
A lot of stripper systems recommend using an oxalic acid brightener after stripping to help with the discoloration. I've never used it inside on trim, but the brightener really works good to bring back the natural color of the wood.
Check your system for compatibility. The ox acid is a lot easier to work with than stripper.
Jmayspaint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 11:50 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 51
Default

Stripping off old paint


the original product comes with:
http://www.dumondchemicals.com/home-...utralizer.html

i will use it when all is dry.
Is above same as tsp?

Any recommnedations for oxalic acid brightener?
When to use it?
When all is dry and cleaned?
blwegrzyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 12:12 PM   #22
Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,141
Default

Stripping off old paint


Probably don't need to through tsp into the mix with this, I was just thinking of lead safety. Going by your systems recommendations is best.
If when all the steps to your system are complete, the wood is still discolored oxalic can be used as a final step.
Ox acid is also used as a neutralizer, but I wouldn't recommend substituting, or changing the recommended system.
Jmayspaint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 01:08 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 51
Default

Stripping off old paint


do you apply oxalic everywhere or only darker parts of wood?
blwegrzyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 06:13 PM   #24
Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,141
Default

Stripping off old paint


Everywhere. The neutralizer you are using appears to be pure citric acid. Citric is often used in conjunction with oxalic in wood brighteners.
Still don't mix them. I don't see why you couldn't use it after.
Jmayspaint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 11:31 AM   #25
Member
 
Mr. Paint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: San Carlos, CA
Posts: 341
Default

Stripping off old paint


From the pictures, the wood looks like it has been patched.It looks like poplar in the photos, but I may be wrong. I don't think it is going to be stain-grade wood. If that's what you want, I would suggest brand-new wood.
__________________
The Painter's Paint Store where QUALITY is ECONOMY
Mr. Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mr. Paint For This Useful Post:
RWolff (06-26-2013)
Old 05-13-2013, 05:06 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 51
Default

Stripping off old paint


yep it is not perfect, my plan is to stain it and get whatever effect i end up with, like i did with the wood in the photos i attached earlier.
Before i used heat gun and stripper.
This time only peelaway1.
It still will look cleaner then painted 30 times.
Yep I don't think i can get perfect wood feel.
I just cannot stand that 30 layers paint.
I wonder if i bought the apartment 7 years ago, should i know that my wood frames were lead paint?

Only something like this:
blwegrzyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 05:10 PM   #27
Member
 
Mr. Paint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: San Carlos, CA
Posts: 341
Default

Stripping off old paint


It would depend on what year the building was built. Most paint stores sell lead-test kits I think 1972 was the national cut-off year for lead in architectural coatings.
__________________
The Painter's Paint Store where QUALITY is ECONOMY
Mr. Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 06:15 PM   #28
Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,141
Default

Stripping off old paint


If this house was built in 1929 the chance of lead pain being present is high; 75-80% likely. Now that you have all the paint off, it's a lot safer to work on the trim. But still be cautious about any mess you made, as chips left on the floor can still pose a hazard.
One thing about cleaning up the mess from this project is a regular shop vac filter won't stop lead dust. It's just too fine. A good hepa filter will help, but due to the design of almost all shop vacs, lead dust in the system will "belch" out every time you turn it on. Wear a mask during clean up. Wet clean up is safer.
Lead paint was banned in 1978
Jmayspaint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 06:22 PM   #29
Member
 
Jmayspaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,141
Default

Stripping off old paint


Btw, I like the look your getting better than old paint too. I've seen trim in fancy houses get beat with a chain to make it look "distressed" on purpose. Call it "rustic" or something
Jmayspaint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2013, 11:27 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 51
Default

Stripping off old paint


Finally, I am getting closer to staining and painting the walls.(had to take brake from this crazy project) When my place went through the condo conversion new drywall was overlaid over the old plaster which made the window frames look almost embedded into the wall. I decided to add extra wood so at least the spacing looks good. Attached are the photos how it looks now.
I have a question about using the joint compound to fix the holes.
What joint compound would you recommend?
On the right side of the window I was planing to just use the standard multipurpose joint compound. I though about caulk, but I think due to the fact that the walls are uneven I thought that joint compound would just work fine. On the left side of the frame where i have the wall I have bigger holes, and i wonder what to use to fill those? Should i just stick some paper inside and go over with the compound or use some kind of spray foam?


Name:  IMG_1302.jpg
Views: 41
Size:  12.3 KB

Name:  IMG_1303.jpg
Views: 44
Size:  16.9 KB

Name:  IMG_1304.jpg
Views: 41
Size:  13.0 KB

Name:  IMG_1305.jpg
Views: 38
Size:  14.4 KB

Name:  IMG_1306.jpg
Views: 39
Size:  15.0 KB

blwegrzyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Zinsser Bathroom Paint canuckjack Painting 7 08-27-2012 08:00 AM
Ready to paint the porch! Oil or latex? Leah Frances Painting 8 07-26-2011 07:29 PM
Painting Old House Smokin Gun Painting 36 07-05-2011 01:24 AM
oil base paints NoExperience Painting 30 09-04-2008 05:37 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.