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ponch37300 04-08-2013 07:41 AM

Staining new cabinets
 
We went to HD to get a couple things the other day and ended up with 13 new kitchen cabinets! They had a 20% off sale on all in stock cabinets. We bought the unfinished oak cabinets because the finished ones were almost double in cost and the finish didn't look that good. So my task for the next couple weeks will be finishing these and could use a little help.

I will be finishing these in the basement and will be using a minwax stain and poly unless someone says that's not a good idea. First I will be sanding them all down good. Probably a 80, 150, 220 grit pattern. Is that good for sanding?

Then stain them all. For the stain I can just wipe it on, let it sit, and wipe off right? One coat is good as long as the color comes out good? Do I need to use any sanding sealers or wood conditioners first? Anything else with staining?

Then the poly, any advice on which one to use? I see they make a variety of them, http://www.minwax.com/wood-products/...tive-finishes/ and also come in different sheens. I don't sand between stain and poly right? Then sand with a 320 grit between coats of poly right? How many coats of poly would be good for a kitchen?

I know this is a lot of questions and probably covered many times already but thought I would ask my specific questions and if there is a good how to thread on staining/poly and someone has a link that would be great.

Thanks

joecaption 04-08-2013 08:05 AM

http://www.minwax.com/expert-wood-tips/wood-finishing/

No need for a wood conditioner on oak.
DO NOT USE THE POLY SHADES THINKING YOUR GOING TO SAvE A STEP!
You'll end up with a blotchy mess.
Once you see how much work this is going to be you'll be kicking yourself for not buying the prefinished ones.
Most of those HD cheap cabinets do no have the needed backer board in the inside top of the cabinets, just add a 1 X 4.

ponch37300 04-08-2013 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1154660)
http://www.minwax.com/expert-wood-tips/wood-finishing/

No need for a wood conditioner on oak.
DO NOT USE THE POLY SHADES THINKING YOUR GOING TO SAME A STEP!
You'll end up with a blotchy mess.
Once you see how much work this is going to be you'll be kicking yourself for not buying the prefinished ones.
Most of those HD cheap cabinets do no have the needed backer board in the inside top of the cabinets, just add a 1 X 4.

Thanks Joe, I was actually just poking around the minwax site and see they have a good deal of information on there. I will have to read more tonight. No polyshades for me, I'm more traditional stain and then poly type guy. Yes it will be some work but we saved about 1000 bucks by finishing them ourselves. We're adding a dishwasher into this layout also so it was either finish ourselves and get the dishwasher or buy the prefinished and not have a dishwasher.

I think I know what you mean by the backer board on the inside top. We did get just the cheap in stock HD cabinets, about all our budget allows right now. You're talking about something to screw the counter top down right? The base cabinets have plastic things in the corners with a screw hole in them to screw the counter down. Would you take these out and install 1x4s or you think the plastic pieces are good enough?

clambake6 04-08-2013 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ponch37300 (Post 1154640)
First I will be sanding them all down good. Probably a 80, 150, 220 grit pattern. Is that good for sanding?

Don't use that 80 grit paper. Those cabinets shouldn't need more than a very light sanding to clean off any marks, raised grain, etc.

If it were me, I would do a very light sanding with 180, and finish with 220. Or, you could just use the 220 and call it good. Or use the 180 and call it good. Depends on how clean they are, and how dark you want the wood to stain.

Remember to sand with the grain, and avoid cross-sanding where the stiles and rails meet on the doors and face-frames.

Do not sand between the stain and poly.

user1007 04-08-2013 11:03 PM

Don't try to do it in one pass with the stain. Easier to add another coat then to take one off or find all is too dark. Brush or wipe the stain on, then immediately wipe off the excess. Test and perfect what you want on the back side of a door.

Do sand between coats of poly.

Definitely should not need 80 grit on new cabinets.

joecaption 04-09-2013 06:51 AM

Depends on which tops you bought.
The ones at HD I bought were the ones with the roman ogee profile and I found there were 3/4 short of the top of the stove.
I just attached 1 X 4 pine with Tite Bond II glue and some finish nails making sure they were flush with the outside edges. I predrilled some holes for the screws that go into the counter top.
I also used a bead of Phenoseal on top of the pine so I needed far fewer screws.

Two Knots 04-10-2013 09:05 AM

We're a big fan of using boiled linseed oil on most of our wood
cabinetry that we build. We are not professionals, the stuff we build
is for our own home, but we do a lot, so my advise is based on amateur
experience.
On flat sawn oak there is a lot of characteristic cathedrals in the wood
that take on the stain much darker than the rest of the wood...If you
apply the boiled linseed wood first, this fills in the darker wood somewhat
and the stain will take on more evenly. You need to wait three days after
the BLO application before staining. First sand lightly with 0000 steel wool,
clean it off and stain. I like minwax stains and have had good luck with
them... my favorite is a mix of English chestnut and pecan. I do most
of the finishing, the head knot does most of the cabinet building...I do
all the staining with a rag, as well as the poly coat. I always thin down
the poly with some turp and linseed oil (equal parts) and rag it on as well,
giving it several coats, with a light sanding between coats...

Also, remember to tac rag after sanding.

user1007 04-10-2013 10:53 AM

I agree that processed---not raw---lindseed oil and solvent makes a great wood sealer. Mentors---old timers both---taught me to use it on new woodwork as a sealer.

Two Knots 04-10-2013 11:32 AM

You know sdsester, the reason we discovered boiled lindseed oil
was because we made new kitchen cabs using quarter sawn oak
and rift sawn oak. I knew we could make nice cabs( at least I prayed
that we could) but I was very worried about doing the finishing...it
kept me awake at night. I wanted an even color throughout, even
though there are few dark parts in some of the rift sawn, non the less
there still there, and I didn't want dark splotches glaring at me.

I researched and discovered the BLO was a great sealer filling in the
wood, thus the dark parts took on the stain more evenly. Without it
the dark spots would have stained darker.

We actually finished our cabs with waterlox and not poly, however
we also used the poly mix on additional cabs we made for the breakfast
room...These cabs were added later. Actually, I don't see any difference.

I also mostly use semi-gloss poly, and steel wool it down to the desired
finish I want.

user1007 04-10-2013 03:24 PM

Not sure I fully believe but many use a clear gloss finish on cabinets, floors, etc. for the undercoats and then a satin as the final coat. The idea is the gloss is tougher and the satin provides a less glaring sheen.

I offer this as food for thought.

Like I say, I have never had a problem using PROCESSED/BOILED lindseed oil and solvent for trim. You are in for one sticky gooey, non-drying mess if you use RAW lindseed oil. Seems to me it would be too thick to penetrate well on its own but maybe not. I have found it works really well to seal pine, fir, etc. wood trim. Follow with an enamel underlay and then your finish coats. Or stain and varnish as you did your oak. It does even things out which is what a sealer is for of course.

Your cabinets sound nice. You should post some pics and a project description in the project section when you have time.

Two Knots 04-10-2013 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1156280)
Not sure I fully believe but many use a clear gloss finish on cabinets, floors, etc. for the undercoats and then a satin as the final coat. The idea is the gloss is tougher and the satin provides a less glaring sheen.

I offer this as food for thought.

Like I say, I have never had a problem using PROCESSED/BOILED lindseed oil and solvent for trim. You are in for one sticky gooey, non-drying mess if you use RAW lindseed oil. Seems to me it would be too thick to penetrate well on its own but maybe not. I have found it works really well to seal pine, fir, etc. wood trim. Follow with an enamel underlay and then your finish coats. Or stain and varnish as you did your oak. It does even things out which is what a sealer is for of course.

Your cabinets sound nice. You should post some pics and a project description in the project section when you have time.

sds...not sure if you were talking to me or not.
to be clear, I mostly use my semi-gloss mix ( usually 3 - 5 coats) then sand it down with 0000 steel wool to the desires finish. I don't use semi gloss then
high gloss.
oh.... just realized when I said ' mix'.... I didn't mean semi gloss and gloss poly mix, I meant 'my mix' about equal parts poly, terp, and lindseed oil.
sorry for the confusion.


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