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-   -   spray gun vs roller brush (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/spray-gun-vs-roller-brush-131241/)

debd 01-24-2012 12:57 PM

spray gun vs roller brush
 
I'd like to hear the advantages of using a spray gun or a roller brush for a lacquer based sealant paint used to cover smells. Does one cover better? Does one use less paint?
Thanks for your help

user1007 01-24-2012 01:05 PM

What smells and in or under what surface are you trying to cover? Why would you use a lacquer sealer?

Generally speaking, if you are not accustomed to using spray equipment you should stay away from it. And even if you are? Unless the place is empty you are going to spend a lot of time trying to protect furnishings. And plan on masking and tarping EVERYTHING down to doornobs, window latches and so forth off.

I think you will find brush and roller to be more appropriate and much faster.

That said? If there is some need for a lacquer? Spraying is often the best approach.

debd 01-24-2012 01:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 833350)
What smells and in or under what surface are you trying to cover? Why would you use a lacquer sealer?

Generally speaking, if you are not accustomed to using spray equipment you should stay away from it. And even if you are? Unless the place is empty you are going to spend a lot of time trying to protect furnishings. And plan on masking and tarping EVERYTHING down to doornobs, window latches and so forth off.

I think you will find brush and roller to be more appropriate and much faster.

That said? If there is some need for a lacquer? Spraying is often the best approach.

Wanting to cover cigarette smells in a house. BIN lacquer primer was recommended.

Brushjockey 01-24-2012 01:18 PM

Pigmented shellac Bin is better at sealing in smell. ( denatured alcohol reduced)
sds has it for roller v spray

either way use a good gasmask style respirator (2 part charcoal filtered)

user1007 01-24-2012 01:47 PM

At the risk of stating the obvious, you have to knuckle under and scrape/wash as much of the orange tar cigarette gunk off the walls as you can before applying anything. I hate prepping space smokers have lived in more than anything. I don't care anymore what they do to themselves (save for the load the put on the healthcare system) but if anyone ever wants a solid argument about what second hand smoke damage looks like they should paint prep after a smoker.

BraniksPainting 01-24-2012 03:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debd (Post 833339)
I'd like to hear the advantages of using a spray gun or a roller brush for a lacquer based sealant paint used to cover smells. Does one cover better? Does one use less paint?
Thanks for your help

If and when I can, I love to spray but you'll have to back roll after spraying...if it's your finish coat. It's way quicker to spray BUT as some of the other guys mentioned, if you're not experienced with spraying, it could be more time consuming and more difficult. I do want to mention that if you plan on spraying with lacquer.....you need to make certain you clean out the spray equipment thouroughly. Otherwise, when you try to use the sprayer again, it will be froze solid. I'm not saying it can't be done and that it hasn't been done. Also, with lacquer: wear an approved spray mask and go out for air frequently. It's a very powerful smell.
If you want to spray it because it will be your prime coat, tape off what needs taped off and go to town, no back rolling needed. After it's dry, then apply your two coats of finish paint.

Brushjockey 01-24-2012 03:41 PM

She said lacquer BIN- there is no animal.

joecaption 01-24-2012 03:49 PM

I'd use Zineer 123 instead, It has shellac that will seal the stains.
Clean the walls with spray Orange Cleaner before priming, starting at the bottom first.

Brushjockey 01-24-2012 03:52 PM

What? ??
123 doesn't contain shellac. It is great stuff for what it is great for, but i know no one but you that says it's good to stop smoke or pet smell.

Sorry, but I hate to have people misled.

chrisn 01-24-2012 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 833515)
i'd use zineer 123 instead, it has shellac that will seal the stains.:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::ee k::eek:
clean the walls with spray orange cleaner before priming, starting at the bottom first.


say what????? You need to stop handing out advise when you don't know what you are talking about

jsheridan 01-24-2012 05:59 PM

Joecaption, I appreciate your zeal for 123, it's a great product and I thank BJ and the others for pushing it, because I picked it up and like it as well now. However, to pile on, 123 is not a shellac base. It's reduced with water, not alcohol. You told a guy the other night that he used the wrong primer to bond when he said he used Bullseye, that he should have used 123. Well, all Bullseye products are Zinsser, all Bullseye products are bonding primers, and 123 is part of the Bullseye line. Listen to Chrisn.

user1007 01-24-2012 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 833515)
Clean the walls with spray Orange Cleaner before priming, starting at the bottom first.

Spray cleaner is not going to cut through the tar and all and you certainly do not start at the bottom of the wall or the gunk on the top sections of the wall is just going to drip down on to what you just cleaned. Ceilings and light fixtures first then work from the top of walls down. Common sense.:no: Be more careful what you suggest.

jsheridan 01-24-2012 07:06 PM

Cleaning from the bottom up is only required when dealing with translucent finishes or no finish, not opaques, as you're not worried about cleaner streaking. Sdsester is correct.

Brushjockey 01-24-2012 07:07 PM

Sds- Imma gonna have to go with the Caption on that one. With heavy soil you don't want your drips to run through uncleaned areas or you will never get the run stain to go away. Start at the bottom.
And when cleaning smoke stains away- in my experience you never really get it "clean", you just get the most soluble off. Then the primer ( BIN!) does the work.
I also have to say I did a couple of jobs recently that I wasn't trying to kill the odor ( they were still going to smoke) but the stain. After doing the above I used Zinsser Smart Prime- which is a alkyd modified waterborne- and with 2 coats and very little odor held the stain back. I was impressed.
But if the goal was the underlying odor- it would still have to be BIN.

user1007 01-24-2012 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 833684)
Sds- Imma gonna have to go with the Caption on that one. With heavy soil you don't want your drips to run through uncleaned areas or you will never get the run stain to go away. Start at the bottom.

Interesting point taken. If I were trying to preserve the finish on the wall I would work from the bottom up. I would expect to prime over any streaks though if priming and painting.

Sticking by BIN as the only thing with a chance of sealing odors though. Irony is the odor it gives off itself. As others have, aspirator and adequate ventilation please! :thumbsup:

Anybody else ever have to catch and pin bugs in a box for high school biology class? What did we use to kill them? Cotton balls soaked in alcohol in a closed jar. BIN fumes in a closed room could make you feel like one of those bugs!


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