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Old 10-09-2008, 10:17 AM   #1
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What types of solvent will you recommend to remove adhesives and epoxies?

What is the difference between a gel and a liquid wallpaper remover?

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Old 10-09-2008, 11:08 AM   #2
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We used to fix and refurbish computer monitors and people used to love to put stickers all over them. When you peal them off, you have a nice sticky mess left. We would use either denatured alcohol or Goo Gone. If the alcohol would touch the old sticker adhesive, the Goo Gone would get it, and vice-versa. I din't know what to tell you about the epoxy. There ain't much that will disolve it.

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Old 10-09-2008, 12:20 PM   #3
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What are you trying to remove?
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Old 10-09-2008, 11:40 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shellie.elyse View Post
What types of solvent will you recommend to remove adhesives and epoxies?

What is the difference between a gel and a liquid wallpaper remover?
So far as I know, there is no solvent that will removed cured epoxy.

I use:

A. mineral spirits (also called "paint thinner" or Varsol") for pressure sensitive adhesives like most tapes, labels and stickers. The advantage that mineral spirits has over Goo Gone is that mineral spirits will evaporate completely without leaving a residue. Goo Gone will leave an oily film residue.

B. For contact cement, I use naptha (preferably) or lacquer thinner.

C. For most solvent based adhesives, like flooring adhesives and such, I use lacquer thinner.

D. I also use acetone to remove most printing inks.

A "gelled" product is no different than the original product except that it has a gelling agent added to it to make it thicker. For example, phoshporic acid is commonly used as a bathroom cleaner because acids will cut through soap scum easily. However, many acids will also attack chrome plating. Phosphoric acid is commonly used as the active ingredient in bathroom cleaners because it won't harm chrome plating.

Gelled phosphoric acid is commonly used as a toilet bowl cleaner. You can clean your toilet with a phosphoric acid based bathroom cleaner, but it won't be as concentrated and it'll run to the bottom of the bowl, just like water. Similarily, you can clean your bathroom with a phosphoric acid based toilet bowl cleaner. The only difference is that it will be more concentrated and it'll be gelled so that it sticks to inclined surfaces rather than just running off of them.

That is, the reason why the wallpaper remover is gelled is so that it sticks thick as a brick to vertical surfaces rather than just run off and form a puddle on the floor, where it does no good. If I were you, I'd opt for the gelled wallpaper remover so that it goes on the wall thicker and stays on the wall longer.

The active ingredient in paint strippers is methylene chloride, which is a liquid that's about the same viscosity as water. However, it is always gelled because otherwise it would just run off the paint to be stripped like water.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelling_agent

Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 10-09-2008 at 11:43 PM.
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:51 AM   #5
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There are solvents that do a number on epoxies and other hard to remove resins- but they are not generally available to consumers in stores.
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Old 10-11-2008, 12:16 AM   #6
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Carlisle:

Can you give us some examples of solvents or cleaners that will removed fully cured epoxy?
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:05 AM   #7
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Nmp...
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:18 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
Carlisle:

Can you give us some examples of solvents or cleaners that will removed fully cured epoxy?
nmp? is that a product to remove epoxy?
just curious as i've never seen a solvent for epoxy once set.

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Old 10-11-2008, 08:27 AM   #9
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http://www.dynaloy.com/Products/epoxy_products.html seems safe enough, others i find , quite toxic.
but whattaya know? there IS something!
i've always liked epoxy for repairs for it's strength, but to remove it? always had to 'pick and chip' it off. good to be 'always learning'

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Old 10-11-2008, 09:08 AM   #10
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"good to be 'always learning'

That's the spirit! and the first step in learning is getting an idea of what you don't know. Once you say "I'm all ears" - then the learning starts...

There are other solvents for epoxies but, like in everything else, their suitability depends on certain, sometimes unknown, external factors. No one solvent is universal - sometimes blends are more suitable; I've handled most known solvents in my earlier days (with Dow, Dow Corning, GE, Eastman Kodak, Shell and Exxon) and I've formulated with all of them. Some I wouldn't ever touch again...so the list is way too detailed for something like a DIY forum. Some you could only use in a fume-hood, some that were explosive like the nitroparaffins.

My definition of a 'solvent' is a chemists' not a DIYer and is therefore probably a bit wider than most. I can easily say for example that acids are solvents, so are silicones.

And, I didn't learn what I know just from reading stuff in cyberspace either...
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Old 10-11-2008, 09:14 AM   #11
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i have quite a bit of chemistry training as well. i know for instance all glues have a solvent, my concern was more available to layman and safe enough to use. my EXPERIENCE on removing it however is mainly limited to finding thick layers of it gooped all over something it was not meant to be used for. lol
pick n' chip there mostly.

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Old 10-11-2008, 10:01 PM   #12
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Until now I have never heard of NMP.

http://www.basf.com/diols/bcdiolsnmp.html

http://www.basf.com/diols/bcdiolsnmp_properties.html
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:49 AM   #13
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Nestor, I am happy that you now know about 2-NMP and to 'return the favour' - as you provide a lot of information yourself and I have learned a thing or two myself...

NMP first came to our attention in coatings in the mid-eighties, it was new then and I was a rookie but it found an immediate place in the range of solvents we had for paints and electronics. At about the same time, the nitroparaffins came in, specifically AMP (aminomethylpropanol) and nitromethane. Also, DMSO and tetrahydrofuran; and dimethylformamide, for epoxy and urethane resin solutions and paint strippers. These soon started to replace the chlorinated solvents like methylene chloride and 1,1,1,-trichloroethane - which our company recycled commercially back in those days - and the glycol ethers as the push was on to lower VOCs everywhere.

Then we started with volatile silicones as solvents; and that was fun! Much after that came the d'limonene family and since then there have been many additions - but I am less in touch with my solvent buddies than I was then, so probably missed a few new ones.

Then I moved into personal care products and did a stint formulating those. Packed it all in about 5 years ago.

As a matter of interest, you see the KB value of NMP is over 300...now that compares very favorably for some resins to commonly-available solvents that people often think of that are 'good' like toluene.
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Old 10-12-2008, 12:40 PM   #14
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I know that mineral spirits will soften cured silicone caulk.

Are there any solvents that will quickly and effectively dissolve cured silicone caulk?

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