DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   Sherwin-Williams line suggestion? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/sherwin-williams-line-suggestion-12461/)

Shpigford 10-17-2007 12:07 AM

Sherwin-Williams line suggestion?
 
So from all the reading I've done, Sherwin-Williams seems to win hands down on the type of paint to use for interior home painting.

We're about to paint the entire interior of our home (it's a 1400 sq. foot home) and I'd love some insight on which line of SW paint to use.

We're looking for something that's a decent balance of quality vs. cost. We're okay with not using the most expensive, but we also don't want something crappy that we'll have to go and repaint in a year.

joewho 10-17-2007 10:02 AM

Superpaint.

sirwired 10-17-2007 10:54 AM

I've been happy with SuperPaint also.

SirWired

slickshift 10-18-2007 05:20 AM

Hnads Down?
 
Lol...not really no...
I can't stand Superpaint
I find it tremendously drippy and poor color/cover
I can't imagine a situation where I would use it again
If I did, I'd raise the price to compensate for the difficulty

Although I can recommend some SW products, IMO BM Regal is a much better int. product

Shpigford 10-18-2007 08:58 AM

Ultimately I just want something that will give us a fighting chance of doing one coat of paint (we're doing a light beige on top of a textured white wall). I know some people say no paint can do anything in one coat...but with 1400+ square footage of house to paint...I'd like to atleast try. :)

sirwired 10-18-2007 09:04 AM

With a color change of any kind, you really need two coats for a quality job. There just isn't any way around it. If you were just "refreshing" an existing top coat with the same color, you could get away with a single coat.

If you try and do it with a color change, visible pinholes and thin spots are almost inevitable, even with a quality paint, especially with texture. Even more so since you do not paint for a living (neither do I). Yeah, the flaws might be subtle, but whether or not that is good enough is up to you.

SirWired

slickshift 10-18-2007 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shpigford (Post 68786)
Ultimately I just want something that will give us a fighting chance of doing one coat of paint (we're doing a light beige on top of a textured white wall).

Not to again tout the BM line, but try a room with Aura
Follow the instructions and use the recommended tools
(they are little different than traditional methods)
You should be able to get one-coat coverage, but if you don't, touch-up (spot painting) is a dream with this stuff

It costs more in money but it saves in labor

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shpigford (Post 68786)
I know some people say no paint can do anything in one coat...but with 1400+ square footage of house to paint...I'd like to atleast try. :)

True
I always say if there was a true one-coat paint we'd use nothing else
I can't call Aura a true one-coat....but it's pretty close...it's impressive
But still for big color changes it just doesn't cut it

You won't find too many contractors that use it
They've been burned by the "one coat" and other "over-promises" too many times
It also uses different methods of application than they are used to
It's actually easier...but old habits die hard
DIYers or occasional painters seem to like it better
The contractors that can think "outside the box" and apply it also seem to like it

I'd try one room with it and see how you like it
And if you can get it to cover in one coat in your situation

Shpigford 10-18-2007 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slickshift (Post 68871)
Not to again tout the BM line, but try a room with Aura
Follow the instructions and use the recommended tools
(they are little different than traditional methods)
You should be able to get one-coat coverage, but if you don't, touch-up (spot painting) is a dream with this stuff

It costs more in money but it saves in labor

Is there another BM line that might be a tad cheaper but still have a decent change of doing one coat?

Shpigford 10-18-2007 11:25 PM

Also, what about Sherwin-Williams? Do they have any comparable lines? I ask because we can get a fairly significant discount on SW paint (25% off)

slickshift 10-19-2007 05:49 AM

Not really, sorry...
 
Not really
Aura is a whole new animal
A completely different molecular composition of paint
It's completely water based, even the tint (all other paints the tint is actually oil), and the pigment is actually inside the molecules rather than on top
There's more to it, but it's a major restructuring of paint products

There's a chance you might "get away with" one coat of (sw) Duration Home or (bm) Regal
But one can't really say "yea it's a one coat for sure"
For a maint. coat maybe, not for a color change

And th old adage "you get what you pay for" is pretty true with paint...real true
The better paints are more expensive...that's the way it is
Of course they save time/labor and look better

If you are really stuck on the one coat thing, I'd suggest Aura
You can always try one room first, whether you try Duration Home, Regal, or Aura
Maybe you can "get away with it"

Bottom line is two coats (of traditional paint) is always better for looks, protection, and durability

Da Vinci 10-19-2007 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shpigford (Post 68900)
Also, what about Sherwin-Williams? Do they have any comparable lines? I ask because we can get a fairly significant discount on SW paint (25% off)

I love super paint on the outside, but find it difficult on interiors. Classic 99 actually is easier to use inside.

Unless the colors are just a shade off, one coat will not do it. Aura? I don't like it.

Berkeley California Painting Contractor

joewho 10-23-2007 07:21 PM

I also like the exterior superpaint better than the interior.
Classic 99 is really easy to work with.

You might try pro-mar 200. Although some people say it's the same as superpaint without the warranty, it's less expensive than superpaint.

I know that pro-mar 200, light beige will cover white in one coat.

Problem is that the texture will give you a really hard time. I've found that a thick paint is not the answer for texture, even a light knock down is tough to cover. Maybe someone here can suggest a thinner (acrylic enamel?) to help with the texture. Otherwise, I just thin the paint down and go two coats.

sirwired 10-23-2007 09:25 PM

If you look at the spec sheets for SuperPaint, ProMar200 and Classic 99, you will see that the dry film thickness differs for all three, therefore they cannot be the same paint, whatever their other qualities.

SirWired

eporon 12-10-2007 09:14 AM

Quote:

I know some people say no paint can do anything in one coat...
I have found that Behr will do one coat. Until I started reading this board, I did not realize that Behr was looked so down upon. I am curious why actually.

sirwired 12-10-2007 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eporon (Post 79535)
I have found that Behr will do one coat. Until I started reading this board, I did not realize that Behr was looked so down upon. I am curious why actually.

While Behr will sometimes work, it is inconsistent and has a high failure rate. Failure meaning issues with coverage, application smoothness, dry times, or any number of factors that make a paint a pain to work with. Even 20% can be considered a high failure rate if you consider your time to be valuable. Once you paint with a high-quality interior paint, you won't go back.

Pros don't use Behr even though it is cheap because it just doesn't work well enough consistently enough to actually save any money in the end. If they could save money (and therefore make more profit) off of Behr paint, they would.

SirWired


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:35 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved