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Old 04-14-2012, 09:00 AM   #1
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Shed conundrum


I've got a livestock shed that has three different surfaces... part of it was previously stained, part is bare wood, and part has some primer. (Yeh - it's a mess)

Can I put opaque stain over all that? Or should I paint? How should I proceed?

Thanks
Eric

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Old 04-14-2012, 11:56 AM   #2
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Shed conundrum


Going to have to prime and paint it.

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Old 04-14-2012, 02:04 PM   #3
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Shed conundrum


MAB made a magical solid color, acrylic TimberStain stain product that would be perfect for this. A lot of the folks I knew working on antique homes used it in lieu of primer/paint on homes. Among other things it has excellent UV protection.

Last I looked at the website it was still available but only while existing supplies last. I fear it is a product that may go away thanks to the Sherwin Williams acquistion. And I don't know how many MAB stores are still in existence. The product came in tint bases so you could get it in any color. However, SW Woodscapes hints at being the same product but I have not used it and have not been bidding exterior work for others. Here is the chart if you can make sense of it. Woodscapes also comes in factory colors and tintable bases so it can be tinted to any color.

http://www.mabpaints.com/products/products.asp?id=266




Of course, you could prime with something like Benjamin Moore Fresh Start. I would use the alkyd formula. Follow with two coats of paint. Seems like overkill to me for a shed.

Last edited by user1007; 04-14-2012 at 02:23 PM. Reason: Added Photos
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Old 04-14-2012, 04:37 PM   #4
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Shed conundrum


After proper prep of the substrate you can use a solid stain on all of the mentioned exterior wood surfaces. Sherwin Williams Woodscapes is our go to solid and is a pretty good solid stain.
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:03 PM   #5
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Shed conundrum


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Going to have to prime and paint it.
No, wrong, again. Solid stain would be the best choice. SS can be applied over primer and paint, even metal, as long as both are properly prepared. From Cabots about solid stain:
"This versatile, fade-resistant and water-repellent exterior stain provides superior results when applied on new or reconditioned wood siding and shingles, cement siding, manufactured hardboards, previously painted surfaces, aluminum and pre-primed ferrous metal, masonry, stucco and plywood panel siding."

You must love getting slapped around.
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:19 PM   #6
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Shed conundrum


what do you do with your old motor oil?
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:46 PM   #7
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what do you do with your old motor oil?
?????
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Old 04-15-2012, 02:43 AM   #8
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Shed conundrum


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Going to have to prime and paint it.
Another false gem
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Old 04-15-2012, 02:44 AM   #9
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what do you do with your old motor oil?

recycle it

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Old 04-15-2012, 08:01 AM   #10
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Shed conundrum


Recycle your old motor oil by putting it on your shed.

If you have a diesel, you'll have a very dark espresso shed.

Normal gasser, you will have a warm chestnut color.
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Old 04-15-2012, 08:18 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by mn1247 View Post
I've got a livestock shed that has three different surfaces... part of it was previously stained, part is bare wood, and part has some primer. (Yeh - it's a mess)

Can I put opaque stain over all that? Or should I paint? How should I proceed?

Thanks
Eric
Hiya Eric,

JSheridan, SDSester, HousePaintingNY, and ChrisN all have it right...Opaque stain, specifically an acrylic stain, will work well on all the substrates you've described (an oil based sc stain could work also, acrylic would just perform better, longer). Preparation is the key, but it's the same prep that would be required if you painted instead.

We've addressed this topic before on several previous posts, yet there are some responders that can't seem to grasp that the differences between exterior sc stains and paints are subtle, at most. The components of a sc stain and exterior house paint are the same - the ratios are somewhat different (maybe, depending on the manufacturer)...Generally speaking, the pigment-to-vehicle ratio, is what may give a sc stain a little better penetration into bare wood, but the more "stain-like" effect of this lower ratio difference is the film's conformity to the wood's texture - and that conformity is discerned from 2 aspects...(1) because of the stain's lower Pigment-to-Vehicle ratio, there is usually a lower solids content than has house paint - a lower solids content will produce a lower film build - so there's not as much coating on the surface to minimize, or bridge the texture of the wood's surface - and (2) often with a sc stain system, it's a one coat application. Common with a house paint system, a primer is required on bare wood prior to a coat of house paint. So in this scenario, you have two coats of product, at a higher film build, over the same wood surface that could/would then sort of muffle the textural nuances of the wood.

The fact that a primer is "required" beneath paint does not distinguish a difference between paints and stains. Paint could also be used directly on bare wood, without the use of a primer, but the film's lifespan would be greatly diminished. But the lifespan of a stained surface, when applied direct to bare wood, won't compare to that of a primed and painted surface.

In my typical manner, I've probably confused the heck out of you - let me just recap by saying in your case, stain will work fine. As is in any case though, paint will last longer because of solids content, mil thickness, primer application, blah, blah, blah - but also is immediately more expensive and labor intensive.
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Old 04-15-2012, 08:59 AM   #12
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Hiya Eric,

JSheridan, SDSester, HousePaintingNY, and ChrisN all have it right...Opaque stain, specifically an acrylic stain, will work well on all the substrates you've described (an oil based sc stain could work also, acrylic would just perform better, longer). Preparation is the key, but it's the same prep that would be required if you painted instead.

We've addressed this topic before on several previous posts, yet there are some responders that can't seem to grasp that the differences between exterior sc stains and paints are subtle, at most. The components of a sc stain and exterior house paint are the same - the ratios are somewhat different (maybe, depending on the manufacturer)...Generally speaking, the pigment-to-vehicle ratio, is what may give a sc stain a little better penetration into bare wood, but the more "stain-like" effect of this lower ratio difference is the film's conformity to the wood's texture - and that conformity is discerned from 2 aspects...(1) because of the stain's lower Pigment-to-Vehicle ratio, there is usually a lower solids content than has house paint - a lower solids content will produce a lower film build - so there's not as much coating on the surface to minimize, or bridge the texture of the wood's surface - and (2) often with a sc stain system, it's a one coat application. Common with a house paint system, a primer is required on bare wood prior to a coat of house paint. So in this scenario, you have two coats of product, at a higher film build, over the same wood surface that could/would then sort of muffle the textural nuances of the wood.

The fact that a primer is "required" beneath paint does not distinguish a difference between paints and stains. Paint could also be used directly on bare wood, without the use of a primer, but the film's lifespan would be greatly diminished. But the lifespan of a stained surface, when applied direct to bare wood, won't compare to that of a primed and painted surface.

In my typical manner, I've probably confused the heck out of you - let me just recap by saying in your case, stain will work fine. As is in any case though, paint will last longer because of solids content, mil thickness, primer application, blah, blah, blah - but also is immediately more expensive and labor intensive.
Good points ric. I'll add that in the outyears, stain also fails differently than paint and is infinitely easier to prep for refinishing.

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