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-   -   Shadows on my new paint job (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/shadows-my-new-paint-job-137285/)

silverado 03-16-2012 09:34 PM

Shadows on my new paint job
 
We have just put our house up for sale, so I am painting some of the rooms a neutral color. One problem I have been having is that when I do small nail hole repairs with a high quality spackle, and let it dry for enough time, I go back to paint. I have been using Behr premium ultra with the primer, a high quality roller cover, and mix the paint well. I chose a eggshell finish, and have put a med tan color over a light rust color. The paint covered nicely in one coat. Then with certain lighting, I can see shadows over those areas I repaired. I did clean those areas with a dry rag, so I don't understand why that happens. It also happened in a hallway, in a few areas. I kept painting, so I wasn't taking any breaks in between. If I just repaint over those areas, should that disapear, or could I just make it worse? I don't have enough paint to do the whole room over, but the rest of the room walls look great. Thankyou

joecaption 03-16-2012 09:38 PM

I saw no mention of sanding the repairs or priming before your painting over them.

silverado 03-16-2012 09:52 PM

I had used a primer in that room many years ago when we built the house. The paint that I had used in there previous seemed fine, no shadows I seen anywhere. I did use a fine grit sandpaper block to sand just over the damage in the wall, from nails or small screws. I wanted the repair to be flush with the wall

ltd 03-16-2012 10:19 PM

if i understand you correctly you spackled some small holes and painted one coat of paint. what you need to do is first spot prime the patches, for spackle you can use basic latex primer ,flat paint, or even your finish paint .as for going back over it after the fact you will most likely see the touch up:mad:.

silverado 03-16-2012 10:27 PM

Oh no, I think that could be the problem then! I thought using the primer in the paint would take care of that! I know you have to prime after doing repairs, but I thought the primer in the paint would do it. Does it sound like if I go over it, I will make it worse? Thanks!:eek:

DrHicks 03-16-2012 10:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ltd (Post 879264)
if i understand you correctly you spackled some small holes and painted one coat of paint. what you need to do is first spot prime the patches, for spackle you can use basic latex primer ,flat paint, or even your finish paint .as for going back over it after the fact you will most likely see the touch up:mad:.

That's what I'm thinking. Non-primed patches are going to absorb the paint, and will produce an entirely different "finish" than what goes on primed wall.

Brushjockey 03-16-2012 11:08 PM

Another person who bought the line that one coat will do 2 things!
You need to spot prime.
The primer in the paint is a great sales gimmick, but it really means nothing.

Faron79 03-16-2012 11:24 PM

I've been in the retail end of paint for nearly a decade now...

I remember rolling my eyes when Behr started this silliness about P&P in one.
There is no such thing!!

We usually asked people who inquired about it..."How does the primer in the can know how to get to the wall first...?!"

Anyway...
* You HAVE to prime the dried, sanded, & de-dusted patch areas!!!
* It's like painting over quicksand if you don't. Patch materials are very thirsty, and will pull in more resin that surrounding areas.
* That's why patched spots usually appear different/duller at some angles.
* When I do patches, I feather-sand the edges, and check with a small flashlight laid flat on the wall. This shows me if I've missed any humps, bumps, and ridges.
* Then, making sure all dust is gone from the area, I brush a hazy coat or 2 of primer onto the patches, feathering-out to nothing.
* Now I spray the orange-peel texture on, feathering-out a quick spiral.
* Then the WHOLE WALL is primed when the text. is dry.
* Repairs are now COMPLETELY sealed-off. Now the paint won't show ANY variance in sheen, assuming you're putting on an even coat(s) with good tools.
* I've just done our M-Bath this way. I can't find a flaw...ANYWHERE...even where towel-bar holes were patched!!

Faron

mustangmike3789 03-17-2012 01:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by silverado (Post 879274)
Oh no, I think that could be the problem then! I thought using the primer in the paint would take care of that! I know you have to prime after doing repairs, but I thought the primer in the paint would do it. Does it sound like if I go over it, I will make it worse? Thanks!:eek:

how do you seperate the "primer" from the paint?:whistling2:

user1007 03-17-2012 07:42 AM

You have been suckered in perfect fashion by the primer and paint in one marketing hype. Ain't not no such thing. Once you prime, you should be fine. Drop HD a thank you note.

user1007 03-17-2012 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mustangmike3789 (Post 879336)
how do you seperate the "primer" from the paint?:whistling2:

If you had ever bought and used a primer and paint in one product you would not ask a stupid question like this.:furious:

True primer and paint in one comes in cans with lids on both sides. If you open and stir the can with label facing up you are painting and only paint can get on your brush or roller. If you turn it over and open and stir from the other side you are priming. What's more if you pay a little extra for the PREMIUM product you do not have to use a brush or roller at all. You just set the stirred can, either paint or primer side up and it self applies to ceilings and walls. Just leave it in the middle of the room overnight. :thumbsup:

silverado 03-17-2012 07:49 AM

Thankyou everyone! I now know to not spend extra money on paint with primer, cuz it dosen't do what they made it sound it will do. I wish I would have done my own research first, rather than listen to the advertising at the store. I have to say it did sound believable, and there are other companies whose paint claims to do the same thing, like Glidden and Clark and Kensington. Is it too late to go over it with a primer now in those areas and repaint?:eek:

DrHicks 03-17-2012 08:01 AM

It's interesting to me that virtually every paint manufacturer sells Paint & Primer In One. Are they doing that simply for sales?


I've only used Primer & Paint In One on one occasion. 4 years ago I built a garden shed in my backyard in the fall, and was running out of good weather. In fact, when it came time to paint, I had a beautiful Saturday before bad weather was supposed to set in. So, being in a hurry, I used the all-in-one stuff. I was surprised by how nicely it applied, and though 4 years really isn't an adequate test of its longevity, it still looks perfect. I'm pleasantly surprised.

silverado 03-17-2012 08:19 AM

A person learns by asking questions. There are no stupid questions here

user1007 03-17-2012 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DrHicks (Post 879414)
It's interesting to me that virtually every paint manufacturer sells Paint & Primer In One. Are they doing that simply for sales?

Yup. :(And deep down they know better. And at least intellectually, so does the consumer.

Come on. How could you possibly put the appropriate solvent based sealer/primer or primer/underlay in with an acrylic semi-gloss finish?

But psychologically the DIYer just does not want to hear they should use an appropriate primer and two coats of paint for a real paint job when they want to crank out start to finish in a day using a bag of $5 brushes and a $2 roller cover/handle and pan.

And you are correct Hicks, BEHR may have started it but all of them have joined the P&P in One parade now. Actually I am not sure Benjamin Moore has yet but certainly all consumer and box store levels of Sherwin Williams have.

Remember not that long ago when every company offered "superior one coat coverage" and people bought it? It is what the consumer market wanted to hear. Same marketing approach and goal with P&P in One. Just different rhetoric.

Sadly, as the OP points out, the marketing hype don't not never work out so well as promised. Maybe at the end of the day, and not to be overly cynical, it comes down to who cares the final result so long as $20 was saved on primer and paint. Hang the picture of grandma a little lower on the wall to cover blotchy spots.


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