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-   -   settling crack in sheetrock (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/settling-crack-sheetrock-8267/)

diylady 05-06-2007 10:05 AM

settling crack in sheetrock
 
To properly fix a setting crack in sheetrock should I just sand it down, spackle it, sand it??

Hamilton 05-06-2007 01:27 PM

No, the crack will return - it must taped.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-06-2007 01:30 PM

Yes, taped and coated - absolutely....or it will crack again. The tape seals up the area like a patch over a hole in an innertube.

Mike Swearingen 05-07-2007 04:42 AM

I know an old pro painter (40+ years in the business) that solves settling cracks (drywall or plaster) by mudding and taping a 6"-8" strip of black vinyl window screen over such cracks just like you would a strip of narrow sheetrock tape.
Says that he has never had a call-back or a problem using this method.
My guess is that the wider, stronger strip just holds much better over a longer period of time. Whatever. He swears that it works, and he repairs walls and ceilings and paints a lot of old houses around here.
Mike

Hamilton 05-07-2007 09:30 PM

That sounds like it would work, I suppose, being a sort of a...mesh tape. I would use it only with "hot" mud.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-07-2007 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hamilton (Post 44059)
That sounds like it would work, I suppose, being a sort of a...mesh tape. I would use it only with "hot" mud.

Same here.....We only use mesh with durabond (AKA 'hot mud')

BTW - It's never been referred to as 'hot mud' in the New England area....Just "Durabond'...

diylady 05-07-2007 10:09 PM

Should I use the sheetrock tape or the meshy tape??And do I use the full width of the tape or can I make it narrower??

AtlanticWBConst. 05-07-2007 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diylady (Post 44070)
Should I use the sheetrock tape or the meshy tape??And do I use the full width of the tape or can I make it narrower??

If you are using what is referred to as "redi-mix"....(Compound purchased in a bucket), then you should use a 'paper tape'.
Make sure that the entire length of the crack and approximately an additional length of 1" on each end (extended beyond the crack's end) is covered properly with the paper tape and redimix compound.

Do you know how to properly apply these?

diylady 05-09-2007 08:11 AM

not really

cibula11 05-09-2007 09:20 AM

I would make sure that for the crack you take a utility knife and notch out a "v" shape in the crack. It will seem like you are making the crack a little larger (which you are), but this will help when you put down your first coat of mud. The mud will get into the crack and help prevent further spread of the crack. Then apply a piece of tape. Either mesh or paper tape is fine. After you press the tape into the first bed of mud, reapply another coat of mud over the tape. Let dry then sand. You may need to do this a couple of times before you get a smooth surface that blends in with the rest of the wall.

AtlanticWBConst. 05-09-2007 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diylady (Post 44302)
not really

Try this. Look under 'imbedding joint tape'

Link:

http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projec...all/drwl_5.htm

diylady 05-09-2007 09:44 PM

Thanks so much, your the best!!

joewho 05-12-2007 03:04 PM

Theres a few methods and tricks to retape cracks. Usually dependant on the severity and recurrance of the crack.

If yours is done settling then you can just tape, mud, sand as usual.

If there is going to me more settling or recurrance of the crack, you should fill it with Durabond brand powered mix, run a bead of caulk over that and then tape it and use regular, sandable mud on top of the tape. You can also fill with caulk first and lay durabond on top of that. But do both before taping and make sure the materials are below grade, meaning, in the crack but not on the wall surface where you will be taping later.

When you go to buy joint compound, there are basically two kinds. Setting type, which is always powdered. And sandable, which is either pre-mixed or powdered. Plus3 has a setting type, which is sandable called "easysand" which is powdered. It's stronger than the pre-mix but not nearly as strong as durabond. Durabond is NOT sandable but is absolutley thee strongest setting type.

Hope this info adds to the thread DIYLady.

Yours
Joewho


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