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Old 08-18-2013, 12:52 PM   #1
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Rustoleum Restore project


This customer wanted options for improving his deck. These ranged from complete replacement, to deck plank only replacement with miscellaneous other repairs, to minimal replacement and then a product like Restore, to minimal replacement and then a standard stain finish.

In spite of the fact that I told the customer I hadn't used this product yet, he still preferred the Restore solution after doing his research, and in my opinion after looking at the deck condition it was actually a good candidate for what the product was reported to do. The deck overall was in solid condition, certainly not needing complete replacement. Almost all deck boards were solid, although many had developed cracks. They were not concerned about the high surface heat reported with this product.

For the first step any "spongy" boards that appeared to have some rot or not be as structurally sound as the others were replaced (photo 1). Notice that the original boards used 3 nails per attachment location. I don't like nails - I use 2 screws. However in some spots the new boards had some slight warping, or the spaces to put them in weren't dead straight. So I used a crowbar to straighten the boards as needed while screwing down the length of the board. In those locations of extra stress, 3 screws were used for extra strength.

The new boards were pressure treated, but in this case were relatively dry. I waited about 2 months before applying the Restore. If they had been of typical pressure treated moisture content, I would have recommended waiting longer.

Next the deck was pressure washed at high pressure. This is not a situation where the wood needs to be babied. Since it is being covered with such a thick coating, furring of the wood was not a concern (in fact, wood furring might even be preferred for increased adhesion). Getting all the grunge out from the cracks was the main concern, both in terms of adhesion and in terms of preventing rot. In other words, cleaning the material was important and preserving superficial wood surface condition was not. [Edit: however, see my comment in post #7]

Finally, all nails not flush were pounded down.

Restore is a very thick coating. The best I can describe it is the consistency of thinset (because it has sand or something in it), about how I'd mix it for a Kerdi installation, which is to say a bit thinner than for standard tile (photo 2). They give you longer, heavy duty stirring sticks for the "5" gallon pails*, but I don't recommend stirring by hand unless you're Popeye. I used a mixer and heavy duty drill. A strong cordless would work but not as quickly. Contrary to the instructions, I found the product did not settle or separate in the container so mixing during use was not necessary. If you have it mixed at the store and use it within a day, I don't think mixing is necessary.

Since the coating is rolled on, the deck has to be cut in along any edges that touch something you don't want covered. Your standard cutting in skills don't apply - it's difficult to deal with - so taping is mandatory. Also, they don't mention it in the instructions, but since this stuff is designed to fill gaps, and the space between 2 deck boards is a gap, the coating doesn't know which gaps you want filled and which you don't. Therefore, you will have to clear this gap after application. I used a 5-in-1 tool (photos 3 and 4). This isn't very practical over large areas, so when rolling I stopped occasionally to clear the gaps with my brush holder and extension, similar to this
http://www.todayshomeowner.com/wp-co...ole-holder.jpg (photo 5).

You can see how thick it covers, how it fills in cracks, and also how rough the first coat is (photo 6). The overall effect is nice, but during the second coat you are supposed to roll then brush over to get a smoother final result.

You are supplied with a special roller cover to use. This "honeycomb" roller is crucial because of the amount of product it holds. It does not roll on pleasantly, nor does it do you any good to roll back and forth over it, like you would paint. Even getting the most product you can in the roller, it still will not cover as much distance as an equivalent amount of wall space with standard paint. You must be "plowing" an excess of product in front of your roller to have enough to fill gaps and cover correctly. "Pressuring" your roller as you would when painting a wall does no good.

After a few hundred square feet or so, the roller cover will start to disintegrate. Little pieces of the honeycomb plastic fibers will occasionally get rolled into the paint. Whether or not you will see them depends on how thickly you're applying. This relates to how you buy the product. It comes in a 4 gallon bucket or a box with 2 smaller buckets. The box is exactly half the price of the 4-gal, and it comes with a free roller (normally $5). But the smaller buckets are only 116 ounces, 12 oz. short of a gallon. 2 boxes means 2 free rollers, and 24 oz. short of 4 gallons. It's difficult to get all the product out of the small buckets, and you'll need to scrape with a paint stirrer to get most of it out. You will need a minimum of 2 rollers to do the recommended 2 coats (I would never bother trying to clean these, especially since it will be disintegrating during your next coat anyway.) You will need somewhere in the range of 2 to 6 rollers, depending on the size of your deck and how picky you are about roller fragments getting into your finish.

On smaller spaces such as steps, brushing was preferred for me. Since the steps were replaced (new, smooth wood), brushing gives a nicer result anyway. The steps came out smooth but sandpapery (nice non-slip coating.)

I'm out of photos for this post, so will continue in the next....

*They look like 5 gallon pails, but are only 4 gallon.
Attached Thumbnails
Rustoleum Restore project-img_1088.jpg   Rustoleum Restore project-img_1084.jpg   Rustoleum Restore project-img_1085.jpg   Rustoleum Restore project-img_1086.jpg   Rustoleum Restore project-img_1087.jpg  

Rustoleum Restore project-img_1089.jpg  


Last edited by jeffnc; 08-27-2013 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 08-18-2013, 01:04 PM   #2
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Rustoleum Restore project


There is a companion latex stain that matches this, to be used for vertical surfaces (actually any non-walking surface I suppose). This I sprayed on with a Flexio 590. This solid stain is essentially like latex paint, so contrary to the recommendation in the Flexio manual, I used the latex paint settings rather than the solid stain settings. This worked well. I backbrushed all surfaces except the lattice (photo 1).

Note that this coating (the Restore, not companion stain) has to be applied thickly enough so that it will ooze over the edge, for example the rim joists (fascia boards). Rather than cutting this in (which would have been very tedious) I taped the top of the fascia boards and rolled right up to the edge. There was significant "drool" on the tape when I removed it. Depending on how picky you are, you might want to scrape this edge with a 5-in-1 tool to smooth out the rough paint edge.

The balluster sections were removed for some separate work and sprayed separately (photo 2). (All sections were finished with the same stain - it just looks like in photo 2 because of the lighting.) The handrails in the first photo were being replaced and are left there temporarily for safety.

This is a partially finished job which I won't be able to continue til later this week due to weather.
Attached Thumbnails
Rustoleum Restore project-img_1090.jpg   Rustoleum Restore project-img_1091.jpg  


Last edited by jeffnc; 08-27-2013 at 09:06 AM.
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Old 08-18-2013, 01:15 PM   #3
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Rustoleum Restore project


Great info - thanks for sharing! Keep it coming!
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Old 08-18-2013, 01:18 PM   #4
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Rustoleum Restore project


Look maybe its just me, and with out seeing it up close I would have gone s/w solid deckscapes.its thick fills in cracks binds wood fibers and gives an over very nice look . just my opinion, but I think that stuff is ugly .but any who nice job and good post .
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Old 08-18-2013, 02:35 PM   #5
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Second coat should smooth it out, but yes some people find this ugly.
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Old 08-18-2013, 02:57 PM   #6
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Rustoleum Restore project


I fell this is a very good post. As long as it is in the box stores I will be asked about it and it won't matter what I think about it's beauty aspects some are going to want it. So thanks look forward to follow up.
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Old 08-18-2013, 03:08 PM   #7
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Rustoleum Restore project


Yes, once it's prominent in stores, you have to start familiarizing yourself with it, at least a little, so I'll be keeping my eyes open for any reports on similar products. One that comes to mind is Olympic Rescue It.

Note: this Olympic video recommends not pressure washing (to avoid "driving contaminants into the wood").


Their recommended brush technique looks mind numbingly tedious over an entire surface. Also it looks like this product is thinner or at least does not have sand in it, and does not fill cracks nearly as well as Restore, based on what I saw in that video.

Also this
http://www.armorpoxy.com/pool-coatin...ck-resurfacer/

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Old 08-20-2013, 10:25 AM   #8
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Oh, and Behr DeckOver is another one. There was an in-store demo of this applied to some planks (brand new wood, not old), and ironically there was a tiny crack (1/16") in the wood which did not get filled in. I might be willing to attribute this to user error since the product claims to fill cracks up to 1/4", but the coating just did not look as thick as Restore. DeckOver was much smoother looking and certainly didn't have as much sand in it as Restore. This could be a pro or a con depending on your deck and what look you want. Restore looks like you're putting a layer of concrete on there, DeckOver looks more like a layer of paint.

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Old 08-26-2013, 03:56 PM   #9
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Rustoleum Restore project


Upon returning this week in good weather, the coating looks pretty heavy duty. As the coating dried, it seems to have shrunk a little, leaving some cracks visible. Any remaining cracks are very slim. Perhaps this is why they call this a 2-coat product. It certainly has enough film thickness after the first coat, but really needs a second coat to fill all cracks. At least with the way I applied it.

The first coat was also quite bumpy. It does not look comfortable to walk on in bare feet (though it didn't occur to me to try.)

For the second coat, I backbrushed it (the directions call this optional.) For any deck I'd ever want to own, I'd call it mandatory. However in some cases (like a dock for example) I could see how you might prefer a rougher surface. It would certainly be a non-slip type of surface. But backbrushing definitely improved the look in my opinion.

The overall impression is of a very tough, thick finish. It looks like if it holds up, it will seriously protect the wood, including any knot holes.

Did not have my camera today - maybe if I head that way again I'll snap some.

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Old 08-26-2013, 04:14 PM   #10
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Rustoleum Restore project


Jeff, Good report, thank you. How is the coating once it gets wet? I mean, is it slippery or is the footing still pretty good?
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:32 PM   #11
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No idea from experience, but it's basically a sandy type coating, so I assume it's relatively non-slip.
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Old 08-27-2013, 07:06 AM   #12
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Thanks for the great account of your experience with this stuff! To me the look is no worse than a composite deck. Just one question and obviously you do not know yet how it will hold up to temp extremes. But, given your experience with applying it and perceptions of the finished product? Would you hype it to clients and a viable alternative? And how bad was the deck when you started? Was this, more or less, a product of last resort?
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:38 AM   #13
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I wouldn't hype it, because I don't think it has universal appeal. Too many people would not like it. I'd throw it out there as an option for them to check out, and then if they view the sample boards at Home Depot and said "Hey, I really like that", then I'd go with it. I'd guess an equal number of people would say "Hey, I really hate that."

There are other "deck restore" coatings that are much smoother than this, but of course I'm sure that means they don't fill cracks as well either.

One really good use for it: brushing it on wooden steps. This is a great non-slip coating, and one good option would be to stain the rest of your deck, then apply Restore to the steps only, in a matching color. (If you use the Restore acrylic stain, then the matching color is obviously a no-brainer). It would be a safe choice, without "wrecking" the smooth look of your entire deck. Note I said brushed on, not rolled on the steps. The result is overall smoother/flatter looking than the rolled on version, but sandpapery.

I think it would not be a good option for new wood, unless people wanted slip resistance. Or maybe for a dock. I have a question about how well it will even adhere to really smooth, new wood. Because of the thickness of it, it seems like it would stick much better to wood with nooks/crannies/cracks. Don't know that it would be an issue on smooth wood - just speculating. But to me there would be little point in building a new deck and then putting this on it. I'd much rather go with composite or wood with an oil semi-transparent.

I think it would be a good option for a deck with the vast majority of boards in solid structural condition but poor superficial condition. It would offer far more protection than regular stain, but at far lower cost/effort than replacing all the boards.

A composite deck will look about the same from a distance, but composite material is smoother, whereas this is a fairly rough finish, even with backbrushing the second coat (which helps a lot).

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Old 08-27-2013, 08:54 AM   #14
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Looks like a cool project! Good luck!

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