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1simple 12-04-2007 04:18 PM

Repainting a New House
 
I'm buying a new house that will be completed in one month. Once the house belongs to me, I will go in and redo some things, such as repaint, add crown molding and replace the flooring. The existing walls & ceilings will be a light neutral color (almost a peach color), but a very light color. It is flatt paint with all trim being white semi-gloss. All paint is latex.

I plan on repainting the walls & ceilings a different, light gray color in the blue family.

1. Since I will be repainting the house within a month or two after it was painting and should be fairly clean when I get it, should I do anything to it? Wont need primer or anything right, just repaint & that's it?

2. I see it would be probably easier to roll than spray since I"m not a painting expert, a lot less prep work, even though the house will be empty. Would most of you advise to cover all the trim & baseboards or just use a brush to paint next to it? What do the professionals do?

3. I plan on using semi-gloss on the walls. Would you recommend repainting all the trim with gloss or semi-gloss should look good? If repaint, should I do anything to the existing paint?

4. Flatt or eggshell best for ceilings?

5. Should I paint the walls & ceilings before putting up crown molding, would that be easier? Or would it be the easiest to put up the crown, do the ceiling (don't prep the crown), paint the crown and then paint the walls?

6. Do most professionals use roll or spray?

7. Does anyone like PQI have a chart that rates paint brands? If you take the top of the line brands from Lowes, Homedepot, Kelly, Sherwin, how is one to figure out which one is best and most bang for your buck without over paying?

Thanks for your time!

Curtis

NateHanson 12-04-2007 05:19 PM

I'm just a homeowner, but I can answer the simple questions:

1) I wouldn't use primer for that, but you might have to see how it goes. Primer (even on freshish paint) will help the top coat go on smoother, and stick better.

2) I would not mask the trim. I tried that once, and it's far more trouble than it's worth. Get a 2 1/2" sash brush, and cut in the trim while rolling the rest of the walls and ceilings.

3) I'd leave the trim semi-gloss, and personally I'd paint the walls eggshell or sateen . . .

4) . . . and the ceiling flat.

5) I'd definitely do the ceiling, then walls (just rolling to within an inch of the ceiling-wall corner) and finally install the crown moulding and paint that last. I'd prime the moulding before installing it.

Chazbe 12-04-2007 05:44 PM

Why dont you talk to the painting contractor or your builder and just have them paint the house in the colors that you want. Even if there is a upcharge it would still be cheaper to go that route.
Chuck

1simple 12-04-2007 06:12 PM

The house has already been planned, I came in after the fact, too late to make any changes. I wish I could!

slickshift 12-04-2007 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
1. Since I will be repainting the house within a month or two after it was painting and should be fairly clean when I get it, should I do anything to it? Wont need primer or anything right, just repaint & that's it?

You should be fine just re-painting
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
2. I see it would be probably easier to roll than spray since I"m not a painting expert, a lot less prep work, even though the house will be empty. Would most of you advise to cover all the trim & baseboards or just use a brush to paint next to it? What do the professionals do?

I usually paint the trim last so it's not an issue
If I'm not painting the trim, or it's already painted, I rarely tape it off
Tape shouldn't be used for cutting lines, only for splatter and drips, and the paints I use (premium paints) generally don't splatter or drip much
Any occasional drips can be wiped up as the happen
*if the trim was stained and not poly'd, I might tape it off...only because you can;t easily wipe up drops
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
3. I plan on using semi-gloss on the walls. Would you recommend repainting all the trim with gloss or semi-gloss should look good? If repaint, should I do anything to the existing paint?

It's hard to get latex paint glossier than "semi-gloss"
Most high glosses are oil
Semi-gloss is about the glossiest I use on trim
By far most trim I do is satin
Semi-gloss on the walls would be highly unusual...and very shiny
The most popular sheen for walls these days seems to be eggshell, followed closely by the old standby flat/matte (flat used to be the most popular, matte is a washable flat)
Pearl or satin is popular for baths and kitchens-though eggshell still has them beat in those rooms...by a decent margin
I can't remember the last time I had a customer seriously consider semi-gloss for a wall
That doesn't mean it's wrong, it's just unusual
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
4. Flatt or eggshell best for ceilings?

Flat is fine...and still the most popular
But eggshell is pretty popular when the walls are eggshell, and the ceiling is going to be wall color
Eggshell is also popular in damp baths and kitchens
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
5. Should I paint the walls & ceilings before putting up crown molding, would that be easier? Or would it be the easiest to put up the crown, do the ceiling (don't prep the crown), paint the crown and then paint the walls?

Ideally (and it rarely works this way...lol) paint the ceiling/walls
Prime and first coat the trim off the wall
Install trim, fill holes
Final coat trim on the wall
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
6. Do most professionals use roll or spray?

It's not that simple
Most occupied re-paint pros roll
Most new const. pros spray
Quote:

Originally Posted by 1simple (Post 78399)
7. Does anyone like PQI have a chart that rates paint brands? If you take the top of the line brands from Lowes, Homedepot, Kelly, Sherwin, how is one to figure out which one is best and most bang for your buck without over paying?

It's difficult to over pay
With paints, you still tend to get what you pay for
It's also personal thing (Ford/Chevy)
But as a basic guideline...

Shop where the pros shop
If they though they could save 10 bucks a gallon, and still get it done and have it look good in a reasonable amount of time they would
Same with tools and sundries
If the cheapos still worked well and made it quicker, they'd be all over them

By far, most quality professional painting contractors by most of their paint product from a Paint Store (or paint dept in a contractor supply-type home center/lumberyard), not at a big box or dept. store paint dept.
You will get much better product, tools, and advice
Well worth any (if any) extra cost
It will save you hours, if not hours a day, and possibly days on larger projects

Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, Pittsburgh, California, Kelly Moore...they all have "contractor/builder" lines (cheaper), but the premium lines are all pretty good

Pretty much anything from Lowes/HomeDepot/Sears/Wal*Mart is going to pale by comparison, if not be downright frustrating and time-consuming

Go with the good stuff, whatever the price...it's worth it
Your time is valuable...save as much as possible

sirwired 12-05-2007 02:05 PM

1) I'd make sure the builder primed before skipping priming yourself. Some (though not most) builders skip this step.
2) Just "cut in" your trim. Tape is good for protecting hardware if you don't want to remove it.
3) Semi-gloss would not be my first choice for walls. Remember that the higher the sheen, the more likely it will show defects in the wall, and your paint job... All a matter of taste in the end, I suppose. In any case, I would bump the trim at least one sheen higher than the wall, but you are going to have to use a waterbourne enamel (I use SW ProClassic) instead of just paint. (The waterbourne enamels have other advantages... use search for details.) Keep in mind that painting trim is going to GREATLY increase the amount of time the job will take. If you do repaint, a scuff-sand and wipe-down of the existing trim can help ensure good adhesion, although it is probably not strictly necessary with a paint job this new.
4) I've used flat for all of my ceilings, but if I had semi walls, I suppose I might consider eggshell there. Again, the lower the sheen, the easier it is to hide defects in your paint job. For a novice painter, getting even roller pressure on a ceiling is all sorts of fun. (Ask me how I know... :-)
5) I'd paint the wall after doing the crown, especially with high wall sheens. You are almost certainly going to dent or scuff the wall when putting up the crown, and touching up high sheens is difficult. When doing crown, I did Ceiling (ceilings always go first because of roller spatter), Wall, Trim. (I find it easier to keep trim paint from getting on the wall than keeping wall paint from getting on the trim.)
6) Pros spray for unoccupied houses, but you should probably roll. I would it were my house.
7) Go to an actual paint store and buy near or at the top of their line, and you should be fine. If you value your house and your time, just skip BigBoxCo.

Also, I STRONGLY suggest getting 1 qt color samples (SW sells these for only $5) and trying them out on the actual walls in the actual rooms before buying gallons upon gallons of paint. Just going by the chip is an expensive exercise in frustration. (It was through the use of samples that I learned SW wasn't kidding when they called a particular yellow shade "Daffodil". We decided after that to ignore the "Bold" part of the color fan.)

On that note, a real paint store will let you buy a full color fan for cheap. These are much better than fifty trips to the store to look for just the right strip.

And don't skimp on rollers or brushes, unless you enjoy pain and suffering. I've been happy with using the ubiquitous 3/8" Purdy White Dove 100% polyester sleeves, and a Purdy 2 1/2" angle sash brush, but others here prefer 1/2" sleeves, and/or sleeves 50% wool, 50% poly or 100% wool.

SirWired

slickshift 12-05-2007 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sirwired (Post 78574)
1) I'd make sure the builder primed before skipping priming yourself. Some (though not most) builders skip this step.

Good point
If it was not primed, or a cheesy chalking "builder's paint" was used, a problem solving primer (such as Gardz) may be in order

analog414 12-09-2007 09:33 PM

1.) In my area builders flat (CBF-crap builders flat) is nothing more then blown on dust. PRIME this porous stuff out. Then the top coat will look better in the long run as well as less expensive finish paint needed.

2.) Spray is not recommended. MAYBE if all walls and ceilings were the same color. If the contrast is not too great, taping off the woodwork is not needed. Darker colors yes! I would paint all the woodwork one finish coat semi gloss.

3.) Sherwin Williams Home Duration satin is what I LOVE to use. You would be hard pressed to find a more washable paint. Semi gloss paint especially Ben More (:mad:) will be hokey shiny and show all drywall imperfections.

4.) Flat always on ceilings unless a bathroom. Anything else will again will show drywall imperfections more. SW makes a killer bathpaint that I have used since it came out with perfect results(mildew, blacking, blistering,peeling).

5.) Prime and put one coat finish paint on ceiling with roller only. Do the same with the walls. Prime crown molding before install. Install crown, fill nail holes and sand smooth. Caulk crown at ceiling and if needed at bottom. Paint crown one finish coat not going over crown at ceiling more then one 1/2 inch. Now cut in the ceiling paint not hitting TOO much of the crown(1/4 inch) and roll out the second coat. Now finish crown. Now cut in the second coat of wall and roll out.

6.) ALL new construction is sprayed. Re work residential is 99% never sprayed. New construction around here is like this. Bare drywall...First coat of finish paint sprayed. Doors as well in the basement or such. After everything is finished down to the last detail and i mean all trades are finished. The painters come back and paint around everything for the second coat. Now no trades are left to muck up the fresh clean walls.

7.) I love SW paints! I used BM for the first 7 years of my career and they were a nightmare. I give thanks every day for SW paints. I have been using them for the last 16 years and could not be happier. Every year I have no choice but to use BM paint once or twice. Boy each time reinforces that I made the right decision.

joewho 12-10-2007 06:05 AM

1. Since we don't know what paint your builder used, it's hard to say whether it needs to be reprimed. Doubtful.

2.What the professionals do varies. If there's a lot to do and all the trim is tight to the wall, then tape it off. If there's a slight gap, and you aren't going to caulk, then try cutting it in.

3. Don't use semi-gloss on the walls. The shiniest you should use is satin on the walls. Semi on the trim and base. Flat on the ceilings. Eggshell walls will look ok with eggshell ceilings. Nothing shinier than eggshell on the ceilings. You'll get tired of shiny ceilings quickly and, as someone mentioned, it will show every roll and pitch and wave in the drywall.

4. Flat

5.Ceilings. walls. Prep and first coat the crown on sawhorses, hang, putty holes. Spot the putty then final coat the whole crown.

6. On new construction sprayers are used until the final coat, which is likely done with rollers. Use a roller on this one.

7. If you want to know what the consumer thinks, look in consumer reports. If you want to know what pros know, ask us.


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