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Old 05-04-2013, 02:40 AM   #16
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Removing Wallpaper Then Painting Question


PASTE PASTE

PASTE PASTE

PASTE PASTE

PASTE PASTE

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Old 05-04-2013, 08:50 AM   #17
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Removing Wallpaper Then Painting Question


Only tooks about 45minutes to get all the wallpaper down from the livingroom, kitchen and bathroom.



This is where we were confused - before we realized the white stuff was paint or primer (not glue) -- feel a little dumb but, there is a learning curve with all DIY.




My experience patching walls are zero -- in the kitchen, when we removed the wall paper, we found this. Any suggestions how to tackle this? We need to 'fill' the hole some how and then I imagine we can take some sort of 'wall puddy' and fill the small gap in the sheetrock below it?

For the hole will we need a piece of shetrock and essentially 'make it fit' and 'glue' it in with some sort of material?

Thoughts?



Additionally, small cracks or where the sheetrock meets in the living room, when we prime first, will that cover these up fine? Do we need do to anything extra?

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Old 05-04-2013, 10:17 AM   #18
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These are drywall walls and not plaster I assume from your comments?

You will need a drywall saw and something to cut some 2x material with, some 2x scraps, drywall screws, mud, tape, drywall knife, drywall mud pan, and drywall compound. I would get hot mud mix for this.

It may sound contrary to logic but you need to enlarge the hole in the wall so you can get to the framed 2x's to the side of the opening. Right now the hole is to big to try and patch without support behind it. The edges would just flop around and destroy your taping job. Make sure you will not nick plumbing or electrical. A simple drywall saw will work to cut a larger opening.

Once you cut away to framing on both sides, you will sister some lengths of 2x to the framing. You can nail them or attach with drywall screws. These will give you something to attach the drywall patch to.

If that wood piece showing does not stretch long enough, you will need to cut some cross pieces of 2x for the top and bottom of the new hole also. Toenail them into the 2x studs.

Measure a piece of replacement drywall the exact size of the whole you made. Screw it to the supports you added with drywall screws and to that center piece of wood too for stability. If you have a difference in thickness, you may have to make some fir strips to bring the drywall out to the height you need. Or you will have to build up with compound. If it is standard drywall, this should not be a problem.

Mud, tape, texture, prime and paint.

You may find working with hot mud easier for this repair since you can control the consistency and the cure time will be faster than with tub pre-mix mud. Hot mud is sold in boxes (5minute) and sacks with cure times from 5-120 minutes. 20 or even 45 minute mud would be a good starting point for you until you get used to the material. You mix what you need, in this instance since you need a small amount, in your drywall pan. You can play around with consistency, texture, and cure time to find something that comes close to the existing texture.

The cracks concern me. Usually when you see this happening along drywall joints someone did not bother to tape the joints as they should have. This is one instance where mesh tape (usually I hate the stuff), rather than regular drywall paper tape may help. You should apply it over the cracks (it has an adhesive on one side and comes in colors if you think you need an indicator) and then skim coat and texture it in best you can to the surrounding areas. You should not be able to see the mesh tape when you are done. Again, I think you will find hot mix drywall compound more helpful for this than mixed mud.



Store the hot mix drywall compound in a rubber maid type container for future use.

Last edited by user1007; 05-04-2013 at 10:23 AM.
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:34 PM   #19
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Removing Wallpaper Then Painting Question


May be a little easier and a little less work But since I can't tell the size of the hole from the photo this may not work. HD sells drywall patches that are 4"x4" 6"x6" and 8"x8" These are a thin piece of alum. that are covered with mesh tape on 1 side and the other side is sticky. No need to build a frame or enlarge the hole, simply stick it on and mud as stated. The piece of alum. gives it the strength. Plus it's cheaper that buying a piece of drywall and a roll of tape you may never need again. But if you go the other route remember you keep your mesh tape in a sealed container or bag. If left out it will lose it's ability to stick on the wall. Oh yea on the patch it is thin enough that it does not make mudding a problem. Good Luck
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:28 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
All good questions-
As you pull off the vinyl, lay it down and use it for a drop cloth.
Have a bucket to toss gummy paste in, a good sponge and water bucket- a rough scrubbie pad.
Wet the wall with the sponge and let the water soak into the paste. It is probably clay based paste ( brown stuff) and will take a bit-
Then when soft but not runny use a 6" and 4" scraper and scrape the muck off the wall the best you can, toss in the muck bucket.
Then sponge again and use the scrubbie too to get whatever you can get off- change water often. Getting the paste off is very important.

When you have done all you can, let dry , give it a quick sand to knock any nubs off, and then prime with something that will seal the paste residue in-- only 2 products I absolutely trust for this-
Zinsser Gardz ( clear thin waterbase) or a coat of oil like Cover Stain. I prefer Gardz. Both have a bit of stink- oil much more.
Then do whatever repairs are needed, sand and reprime those- should be ready to go with a quality eggshell ( best for Kitchens) .

I think Ben Moore Regal Select is fantastic, but there are other good choices.

Good luck!
All Good advice. The only thing I would add is to use warm water and vinegar to sponge off the residual paste. I use a 10 inch drywall knife to remove old paste, but smaller will do too. Just take a bit longer. Most of the paste I have run into is wheat Paste, not sure what clay based is, but it must be if you say so.
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Old 05-04-2013, 02:43 PM   #21
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I bet you run into almost no wheat paste. It would have to be a very old paper ( WWII and prior for the most part) and a very absorbent pulp paper.
Used to strip it all the time until about the later 80's. Then most of it was gone.
If the paste looks brown, it is clay based. Then there are the clears. And the clears from prepasted.
About all that's been used ( of course with infrequent exceptions) for the last 20 years.
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:23 PM   #22
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The paste almost had an orange color to it. Orange brown vs brown orange?? Unless I am color
Blind. I can not confirm the paste type, especially as it is all gone now - the stuff in the kitchen was a lot harder, and my guess older based upon the wall paper. Even though the kitchen stuff was harder, it came off easier than the living room. I think the age made it come off easier. The house was built in 1948
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Old 05-04-2013, 06:27 PM   #23
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Tips or advice on sanding? Electric sander - belt or hand? Does it make a difference other than size of the sander and thusly how quick we can get the job done? What grit paper?

Thanks
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:43 PM   #24
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No belt to easy to gouge and too agressive.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:26 PM   #25
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Hand sander- nothing more unless you've spent the really large money on a pro system.
Get one of those with a handle that takes a screen
After stripping and removing as much -paste- as you can, give it a quick one to knock the nubs left off, prime the whole mess with Gardz. Then fix your hole ( good ideas above) , screen tape your cracks- (first coat sets tape, second fills in and fans out-12" blade-, 3rd coat fans out farther so no hump.).
Ist coat could be powdered "setting" or "hot" mud, finish with something sandable like Plus 3. Sand with 100 or 120 grit on plus 3.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:31 PM   #26
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So what I read was 100 or 120 grit as my walls are in good shape. How intense do I need to get with sanding that is how long should it take? I am not sure how to better ask that. How much sanding is enough/ the right amount
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:34 PM   #27
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You probably wrote that same time I wrote the above. I'd do as I said, then after repairs prime again with a white primer . Then you will see what needs more work with the mud.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:55 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Hand sander- nothing more unless you've spent the really large money on a pro system.
Get one of those with a handle that takes a screen
After stripping and removing as much -paste- as you can, give it a quick one to knock the nubs left off, prime the whole mess with Gardz. Then fix your hole ( good ideas above) , screen tape your cracks- (first coat sets tape, second fills in and fans out-12" blade-, 3rd coat fans out farther so no hump.).
Ist coat could be powdered "setting" or "hot" mud, finish with something sandable like Plus 3. Sand with 100 or 120 grit on plus 3.
I flowed you until finish with something sand able like Plus 3
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:45 PM   #29
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It's a premixed bucket of taping compound made By USG.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:27 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
I bet you run into almost no wheat paste. It would have to be a very old paper ( WWII and prior for the most part) and a very absorbent pulp paper.
Used to strip it all the time until about the later 80's. Then most of it was gone.
If the paste looks brown, it is clay based. Then there are the clears. And the clears from prepasted.
About all that's been used ( of course with infrequent exceptions) for the last 20 years.

all true

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