Removing Thick Enamel From Outdoor Decorative Wrought Iron - Painting - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-04-2012, 10:49 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Multiple thick layers of chipping rust-resistant enamel on decorative wrought iron (outdoor).

Wire brush on pneumatic drill not very good at getting down to bare metal or dealing with stubborn pieces that won't come off, and and the brush cannot reach nooks and crannies of the decorative iron.

Pneumatic needle scaler gets down to bare metal quicker, removes stubborn chunks of paint, and gets into nooks and crannies better, but still very slow going and it leaves and hands and forearms tingling and numb for hours afterwards, despite thick gloves.

I have never used a sandblaster and am considering buying a small portable one (have a full-face mask and respirator). Would sand/media blasting with a portable unit get down to bare metal as well as the needle scaler when dealing with thick layers of rustoleum style enamel, and if so, would you recommend a particular medium i.e. something other than sand?

Advertisement

diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 10:53 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 27,811
Rewards Points: 738
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Why not just use paint remover?
To sand blast your going to need one really big compressor to keep up with it and have to deal with the mess from the media after.

Advertisement

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 11:26 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Why not just use paint remover?
To sand blast your going to need one really big compressor to keep up with it and have to deal with the mess from the media after.
Is there something innocuous you could recommend that would get down to bare metal through several thick layers of metal enamel? I'd prefer to avoid VOCs.
diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 12:46 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,402
Rewards Points: 558
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Ok, there are 4 ways to do this 1) use a hand held wire brush and scrub until your shoulder hurts and arm falls off and still you won’t get into all the crevasses. 2) Wire cup brush attached to a drill and go at it a little faster but the end result is still the same. 3) Use a chemical stripper which in my opinion is slower than and just as tedious as the other 2 methods plus you have to wear gloves, mask, and use drop cloth to clean up the mess. 4) Sand blasting is the way to go on this one if you want it done fast and down to the bare metal. Note: you can tackle this one of two ways 1) rent your equipment and make a really big mess or 2) remove the railing and send it out to get sand blasted then paint and reinstall. We have done all of the above and found the last method to be the cheapest and cleanest method for the customer.
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 12:56 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 27,811
Rewards Points: 738
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


If your going to go to all that work you could just replace it with a powder coated railing and never have to work on it again.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 01:20 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,402
Rewards Points: 558
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
If your going to go to all that work you could just replace it with a powder coated railing and never have to work on it again.
Galvanized would be the better choice. Life time maintenance free…
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 04:12 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
If your going to go to all that work you could just replace it with a powder coated railing and never have to work on it again.
I'd rather buy a new tool :-)
diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to diy888 For This Useful Post:
ToolSeeker (11-04-2012)
Old 11-04-2012, 04:26 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by epson View Post
.... 4) Sand blasting is the way to go on this one if you want it done fast and down to the bare metal. Note: you can tackle this one of two ways 1) rent your equipment and make a really big mess or 2) remove the railing and send it out to get sand blasted then paint and reinstall. We have done all of the above and found the last method to be the cheapest and cleanest method for the customer.
This is actually something a little more complicated than a railing. It's holding up our front porch roof on three corners, so I'd have to install temporary supports in order to remove the wrought iron and have it done by a shop. And I'm trying so avoid having to pay other people to do the work. I have a little 8GAL 2HP compressor that can get over 4CFM at 90psi, most likely not powerful enough to do the job, so maybe I would rent a bigger compressor.

As for the mess ... would sand work as the blasting medium? If so, it would be just be getting all over our front porch but I could sweep into the front lawn, where it could stay. I'd wear a respirator for the silica dust.
diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 05:37 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ontario Canada, Toronto to be exact.
Posts: 1,402
Rewards Points: 558
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Yeah those are called corner posts/ single posts. Some have 3 legs others have 2 legs and they usually are screwed to the underside of the roof. As for the bottom, either they are bolted to the cement or cemented in. And yes you would have to support the roof before removing them.

I have never used a sand blaster but have seen them used many times. You would have to use the sand blasting medium not just regular sand. I know in a controlled environment you can reuse the sand blasting medium but if you tried that with regular sand I would think you would damage the gun. Please read the manufactures instructions on the bag of how to dispose of the used medium or ask the rental shop.
epson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2012, 06:48 PM   #10
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


There is a cryogenic system out there that uses carbon dioxide pellets or something like that. The system is nice because drifting sand abrasive is not an issue. I saw it used on American Restoration. The pellets do their thing and then just melt. All left to clean up is the paint blasted off.

http://www.deepsouthind.com/services/ice-cleaning.html

Make sure if you sandblast you contain as much as you can and park things like nice car finishes out of harms way.

Do think about refinishing electrostatically. If not be sure to use a nice self-etching and rust inhibiting primer. It would be a shame to get the surface prepped and not do what you can to protect it.

Last edited by user1007; 11-06-2012 at 02:47 PM.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2012, 10:20 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 205
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Soda blast. Then powder coat
CaptRandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2012, 10:59 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
There is a cryogenic system out there that uses carbon dioxide pellets or something like that. The system is nice because drifting sand abrasive is not an issue. I saw it used on American Restoration. The pellets do their thing and then just melt. All left to clean up is the paint blasted off.

http://www.deepsouthind.com/services/ice-cleaning.html
Do they sell a portable ice blaster, or do you have to hire one of their fleet trucks?
diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 02:46 PM   #13
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by diy888 View Post
Do they sell a portable ice blaster, or do you have to hire one of their fleet trucks?
I honestly do not know. I know the one I saw in action was nice because it did minimal damage to the surface and they were using it where blowing sand could have damaged surrounding things (as I remember). I don't know if something that operates at frozen or even cryogenic temperatures is a DIY tool or not.

Captain R mentioned soda blasting which is a bit slower than sand blasting but something worth looking into.

If you have not, I would get some estimates on having somebody do this even if in place. It may be that by the time you buy all the abrasives, rent the equipment and so forth it is cheaper to just have it dealt with?
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 02:48 PM   #14
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptRandy View Post
Soda blast. Then powder coat
You raise a question I have wondered about. Can you cure a powder coat in a situation like this. I guess electrostatic painting is somewhat the same? I always think of powder coat as baked on though and the OP needs these to stay in place.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2012, 05:47 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: PA
Posts: 169
Rewards Points: 150
Default

removing thick enamel from outdoor decorative wrought iron


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Captain R mentioned soda blasting which is a bit slower than sand blasting but something worth looking into.

If you have not, I would get some estimates on having somebody do this even if in place. It may be that by the time you buy all the abrasives, rent the equipment and so forth it is cheaper to just have it dealt with?
I will read up on the advantages of soda blasting.

What I often find to be the case is that my purchasing equipment and doing the work myself is no more expensive than hiring someone to do it, and often significantly less expensive, despite the equipment purchases. I started out several years ago with a hammer and some screwdrivers and now I have many good tools, all purchased to renovate a bathroom, and the DIY cost of the project was only 60% of having a pro do it-- if we don't assign a dollar value to my time and labor, of course. It took me 50 times longer than a pro would have taken because I had to learn everything as I was going along. The internet (helpful folks on forums like this) is my mentor

Advertisement

diy888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing old thick wallpaper past Pierson Paint Painting 22 11-14-2011 06:11 PM
Replace wrought iron railing mailman Building & Construction 6 07-06-2008 03:29 PM
wobbly wrought iron railing sleeples65 Building & Construction 5 05-20-2008 07:31 PM
Wooden Top For Wroght Iron Railings ThomF Carpentry 10 11-01-2007 12:41 PM
Wrought Iron Railings for Stairs ThomF Carpentry 3 11-01-2006 08:04 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts