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Old 07-31-2013, 11:27 AM   #31
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


There is a new attachment for oscillating tools called the Putty Chomper. It is Fantastic!! Try puttychomper.com

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Old 07-31-2013, 11:30 AM   #32
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


There is a new attachment for oscillating tools, it's fantastic! try http://www.puttychomper.com
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Old 07-31-2013, 05:58 PM   #33
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


There is a tool specifically made to heat up old window putty. It looks like a soldering iron, with a 90 degree point on the end. It works great.
I have restored countless old colonial windows in the Concord, Mass. area using our window iron. Some of that putty was approaching one hundred years old, or older, and was hard as a rock. Take your time, let the heat do the work, and remove the softened putty with a stiff putty knife.
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Old 11-14-2014, 04:00 AM   #34
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Bumping this old thread because I am working on a very similar project.

I took one sash out of a 1920s (?) frame and tried to remove the putty mechanically, mostly using a chisel. I did get all of the glass out, though I broke a few in the process.

But an encrustation of old putty 1/16"-1/8" thick remains, so after reading this posting I thought I would try the raw-linseed-oil-and-bleach method. I mixed up a 50:50 blend and brushed it on the putty. I would say it has softened a tiny bit in the past 48 hours, but not enough to make it any easier to get off.

Can anyone with experience with this method make any suggestions? Reapply? Different blend? Give up and try something else?

Should say I assume that this is linseed oil putty, but I don't know for sure. The building was built in the 1980s, but the windows were salvaged from earlier construction. Whatever it is, the putty is rock hard.

Many thanks,
traghel

Last edited by traghel; 11-14-2014 at 04:01 AM. Reason: Grammatical correction & additional information
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Old 11-14-2014, 06:52 AM   #35
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Have you tried heating it to soften it?
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Old 11-26-2014, 06:07 PM   #36
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


On a second experiment with a heavier coating of the linseed oil and bleach mixture, it did more-or-less liquify the putty. But it took a lot of oil-and-bleach to liquify a small amount of putty, so I'm not sure whether that will be practical in the long run.

I have not tried heat yet, no. The consensus seems to be that the infrared devices work better than heat guns for removing paint, but what about putty?

Also, how much of the putty do I really need to remove? Clearly I need to get the mating surface between the glass and the mullion clean (i.e., where the inside face of the pane actually touches the wood). But do I need to get it all off the outside edge of the mullion, which will actually take the new putty (i.e., the surface perpendicular to the pane)?

Thanks again,
traghel
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Old 05-03-2015, 05:25 PM   #37
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


I had the task to remove old putty and the replace it with silicon

The problem was that old butty is very hard, so te problem was to remove the putty and the window pane without breaking the pane

I used Q20 a product used to losen ruster bolts

by spraying the putty with this, inside and outside the putty lets go from the woord, there is stil a bit of elbow grease required, the method did make things a lot easier
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Old 05-03-2015, 06:21 PM   #38
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Window glazing putty is nothing more than linseed oil mixed with clay. It was used at a time before there were high performance caulks.

If you have to repaint some old colonial windows, then:

1. Remove the old putty from around each window

2. Put glazing points in to hold each glass pane in place.

3. Now, CAULK around each pane with KOP-R-LASTIC caulk.

Kop-R-Lastic is marketed in the USA by the Henry Company, so whomever sells Henry construction products in your area should carry Kop-R-Lastic in at least clear and white.



Kop-R-Lastic has the major advantage is that over the course of 3 or 4 years it cures to a cohesive strength that's even greater than it's adhesive strength. That is, after several years, it'll stick to itself better than it sticks to other common construction materials. So, if you ever want to remove the Kop-R-Lastic, you just get one end started, and it pulls off cleanly like a rubber rope. And that saves a great deal of time when it comes to refinishing multi-panel windows.

Here is a picture of me pulling clear Kop-R-Lastic caulk off Suite 3's dining room window:



I'm pulling hard and the caulk is coming cleanly off the white vinyl it's stuck to. If you could enlarge this picture, you could see it better.

But, using Kop-R-Lastic caulk will make refinishing colonial windows a breeze, and you no longer have to deal with putty at all.

Kop-R-Lastic tools easily with a soapy finger and it's paintable.
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Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 05-03-2015 at 06:24 PM.
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Old 05-04-2015, 12:02 AM   #39
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


I've done a lot of research and the information on the Historic HomeWorks web-site about restoring old windows is very thorough and helpful. Here's the link to using steam to remove paint and putty from window sashes:

http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1587

Anyway, I'd be hesitant about using chemicals (chlorine bleach, etc.) to remove old putty since it's hard to say whether these chemicals could remain in the wood and cause the new paint or putty to have problems later.
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Old 05-04-2015, 02:22 PM   #40
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Must be nice to have those job-specific tools - we didn't have them back in my old glazier days; we had to get the tip of the flame on a standard propane torch nice and fine, and have a steady hand. I couldn't guess at how many windows I re-glazed that way, torch in one hand and chisel in the other, but the precision of that torch (and the user) applied the heat specifically enough to remove the putty without damaging the frame... or the glass, if we were just replacing the putty.

I'm not sure I'd advise anyone to do it that way though. We were paid experts.
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Old 05-04-2015, 07:17 PM   #41
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


People should realize that putty is nothing more than clay mixed with linseed oil.

I expect that paint stripper would soften up putty just as it softens up dried linseed oil based paints. The active ingredient in paint strippers is methylene chloride, and methylene chloride evaporates completely without leaving a residue. If there's anything remaining behind after paint stripper evaporates, it's the gelling agent that they gelled the methylene chloride with. That should wipe up easily with a paper towel dampened with mineral spirits.

And ditto for heat. Heat should soften old putty so that it can be scraped off more easily just as it softens old linseed oil based paints.
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Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 05-04-2015 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 05-05-2015, 04:22 AM   #42
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Ammonia also fully evaporates and you can mix it with wallpaper paste for consistency.

Anything with basic pH should do it, but as Nestor mentioned, if you use something leaving a residue you'll have to clean the surface thoroughly after.
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Old 05-05-2015, 11:01 AM   #43
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
People should realize that putty is nothing more than clay mixed with linseed oil.
Glazing putty is lime mixed with linseed oil, not clay.
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Old 05-05-2015, 12:48 PM   #44
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


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Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
The only time I tried a heat gun ,I broke all the panes.Must be some trick to it that I could not figure out because I have heard that from others also.
Must shield glass with sheet metal if using heat gun. Heat gun not recommended; infrared heat is preferred because wavelength passes through glass harmlessly.
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Old 05-05-2015, 12:50 PM   #45
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Removing putty from old windows & glass replacement


Quote:
Originally Posted by mattiej777 View Post
There is a new attachment for oscillating tools, it's fantastic! try http://www.puttychomper.com
Wood sash windows don't react well to being chomped. It looks like the company got chomped now too.

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