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-   -   Removing paint from baseboard and trim (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/removing-paint-baseboard-trim-38576/)

tripower 02-17-2009 08:29 PM

Removing paint from baseboard and trim
 
I have some trim which is in good shape but has accumulated a lot of paint over the years. What is the best way to deal with this?

1. Use chemical stripper to remove the paint
2. Use a heat gun to remove the paint
3. Replace the trim altogether

DGideon 02-17-2009 08:46 PM

removing paint
 
Is the trim just spattered on top? Goof-off works pretty well but, you might loose some stain. You can actually use a product called ZAR wood stain after you remove the paint and brush the stain over the trim, let it set for a few minutes and with a soft white china brush, dry brush the stain and I think you will be supprised. After the stain dries top coat it with a poly or varnish.

Scuba_Dave 02-17-2009 08:56 PM

I used a heat gun on mine
It peeled off pretty quickly due to the layers

rh8868 02-20-2009 02:19 PM

Chemically
 
3 Attachment(s)
I came across a product called Peel Away on the forum here. http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/removi...mically-34624/
It worked wonders on brick and I know the company makes a version for wood also. I actually tried some of the Peel Away 1 on my trim and it worked great. BUT! I have not tried to prime and paint it yet, so surely do your homework and read the instructions. It requires a small amount of scraping and a lot of wiping with a sponge, but easier than sanding I'd say. A bit difficult to get into little detailed areas though as with any method. The chemical may be pretty rough on any stain under the layers, but I plan on priming and painting again anyway, just looking for a like new smooth finish without the globs. Good Luck!

PS. What are you doing to the trim afterwards? Paint, stain, not sure?

slickshift 02-20-2009 05:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tripower (Post 232036)
I have some trim which is in good shape but has accumulated a lot of paint over the years. What is the best way to deal with this?

#3
Replace the trim
Heat gun might work...if you are lucky
DIY stripping is marginal at best, and the best way to strip is to remove
Whether you strip and sand it yourself, or have it done
-and as that mean re-install, and either new or stripped trim would need primer and two coats, you may be getting the idea of labor involved by now

Unless the trim is of remarkable value (and it could easily be if it's replacement must be custom milled), labor-wise it's replace the trim all the way

Of course, there is the off-chance an off the shelf stripper may work great
But that is a slim chance...most likely even if it works it'll need mechanical removal (sanding) that would best be done with the trim removed

Not actually looking at the project (is the trim stained/painted/poly'd/painted?), and not knowing what your intentions are (if you want to repaint old painted trim with goobs all over it, perhaps a nice power sanding to smooth the drips and a high build underbody might work), I'd have to say for the most of my clients in your situation (assuming: non-painted wood trim with lots of paint goobers on it), replacement is the best (labor vs material) option

bjbatlanta 02-23-2009 02:34 PM

Trim is pretty inexpensive compared to the many, many hours you MAY be in for stripping paint...........
I'd have to agree with "Slick". I tore all of mine out and replaced it.

skymaster 02-23-2009 03:47 PM

Tripower: DO NOT rip and toss that trim yet. That is to Old "sanitary casing and back banding AND fron the pics you may just have a house full of very very expensive Chestnut! Find a place , maybe inside of a closet, carefully remove some and take it to a refinishing shop, have them strip it and identify the wood. If indeed it is Chestnut then the easiest way is to carefully remove the trim have it professionally stripped then put it back on in it natural beauty! The trim is 2 pcs; the raised outside edge or back banding is an "L" shaped pc that is nailed onto the 3 1/2" flat trim. There is a special prybar I believe "Shark" is one brand which has a very wide,super thin blade just for removing trim.http://www.sharkcorp.com/Sharkgrip/NailPullers.html

bjbatlanta 02-23-2009 04:14 PM

Good call there "Sky". Hadn't really considered the possibilities of having some "unique" woodwork that might be well worth the trouble and expense of restoring! I guess I may be too quick to take the easiest/less expensive route at times.

skymaster 02-23-2009 06:12 PM

Bj: Sadly this happens way too often. The color and grain of that wood screams chestnut or maybe mahogany.

Tri: one very important item, lets presume the trim is worth keeping, WHEN YOU REMOVE IT FROM A PARTICULAR DOOR FRAME FIND A WAY TO MARK ALL PCS SO U PUT THEM BACK TO THE SAME PLACE THEY CAME FROM. Same with the hardware, YES I know it is alot of work and detail however remember this Chestnut and real mahogony are all but extinct. This is non replaceable at any cost.

bjbatlanta 02-23-2009 06:17 PM

And a cabinet maker would know quality wood at a glance........ Hey even the pros learn a few things here!

tripower 02-23-2009 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skymaster (Post 235493)
Tripower: DO NOT rip and toss that trim yet. That is to Old "sanitary casing and back banding AND fron the pics you may just have a house full of very very expensive Chestnut!

Not my pics.... My trim is quite ordinary.

bjbatlanta 02-23-2009 07:08 PM

Oh yeah, I see that now, but a good point anyway......

skymaster 02-24-2009 12:02 PM

OK Tri thought it was yours. Guess it is BJ's? then. :) I trust you know how to get those hinge pins out :}


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