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-   -   Removing old paint from porch ceiling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/removing-old-paint-porch-ceiling-138727/)

cellophane 03-30-2012 09:23 AM

Removing old paint from porch ceiling
 
I'm trying to clean up my porch and need to remove what's left of the existing paint from the ceiling. The ceiling is T&G bead board and is +/- 10' high. The paint that's there is peeling and chipping pretty badly and doesn't take too much to remove but there is a lot of ceiling (200SF+/-) I started last night with a scraper and got a few feet in and today I can barely feel my arm. Is there anything I can do to get the old paint off without killing myself in the process? I would use a pressure washer but I'm afraid of water getting into the space above and causing issues down the line.

Thanks

joecaption 03-30-2012 09:38 AM

Concider this. Bite the bullit and go over the whole thing with beaded vinyl sofit using vinyl cove molding for the trim.
Same look just never have to deal with all the painting again.

user1007 03-30-2012 12:33 PM

Jeeze Joe, I believe you would side or surface the entire World with cheap tacky vinyl. Thankfully, you would not be allowed near houses I worked on in historic neighborhoods that value integrity of homes.

I would rent an infrared stripper and refinish this the right way, not cover it over. No getting around that it will take some work and not used to the movements your body will ache. It will be worth it. Infrared strippers are wonderful, lightweight, fast and safe. Expensive though and waiting lists for rental will be forming.

CaptRandy 03-30-2012 12:46 PM

Soda blast the surface. Get a PW that does soda as well to clean it off.

Ironlight 03-30-2012 01:16 PM

I would go at it with a heat gun and a scraper. Get a purpose-shaped scraper for the bead on the edge. Good paint stores have them. The key is to to do a little bit at a time. Work for 5 minutes, take a break, then go right back at it. It's key for doing things over your head like that if you're not used to it.

OR

Pull it all down, strip it, and reinstall it.

And yeah, Joe does not have any respect for old original construction or details. He's all about what's practical and cheap. :)

CoconutPete 03-30-2012 01:20 PM

I was impressed with the paint stripper i just recently removed 8 layers of paint from one of my doors with. Water based ... doesn't stink etc. and it still dissolved all the paint.

This was on a door laying on a workbench in my garage though. I may not have felt the same if I had to smear it all over the ceiling.

It's an option - that's all I'm saying haha.

chrisn 03-30-2012 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaptRandy (Post 888539)
Soda blast the surface. Get a PW that does soda as well to clean it off.


I like this idea as opposed to stripping 200 sq ft of ceiling


"Concider this. Bite the bullit and go over the whole thing with beaded vinyl sofit using vinyl cove molding for the trim. ":eek:


ABSURD:yes:

user1007 03-30-2012 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 888651)
ABSURD:yes:

:thumbsup:

user1007 03-30-2012 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight (Post 888553)
And yeah, Joe does not have any respect for old original construction or details. He's all about what's practical and cheap. :)

Vinyl is neither practical or cheap when applied to an antique home. The instant it is on, if the preservation association doesn't catch it going and demand a stop or that it be removed? It instantly devalues the property. And vinyl is proving not to be the cure all for never having to paint or deal with exterior issues. Especially if you hire trained monkeys to install it.

It discolors, turns brittle, and traps nasty stuff under it in places.

I will refinish or replace antique cedar/cypress or whatever in a heart beat before turning to tacky vinyl siding inappropriate to the home.

jsheridan 03-31-2012 05:42 AM

You might investigate Peel Away, a stripping system where you apply a gel type stripper then apply a layer of paper, allow it to set, then peel it off. Ideally, you're pulling everything off down to bare wood. It might be tedious applying it to t&g, but what about removing nasty alligatored paint from t&g isn't? I used it mega years ago with mixed results, but the guy I was working for at that time wasn't known for either doing things by the book or allowing things time to work, or dry. I've seen excellent results on This Old House, where they removed 100 years of paint down to bare wood. I've also heard glowing anectdotal experiences as well. Check it out. Any possibility beats dry scraping overhead, ugh.

cellophane 04-03-2012 04:59 PM

I started to do this myself and am going to end up having to hire someone due to time constraints - I am trying to beat a rate lock for a re-finance and this is part of the appraisers comments before it can be underwritten :censored:

The entire porch (concrete) actually needs redoing and if I had time I would do it myself. I did rent a washer for the concrete but as I sprayed it loosened up a lot of paint that scraping alone didn't get, leading to even more work. Combined with the ceiling, a wicked case of food poisoning over the weekend and a time crunch and I'm s.o.l.

I have used PeelAway and wasn't overly impressed with the can I got. To be fair - it was the green product they make and at least some of the paint I was trying to remove was milk paint. I'll see if I can find the architectural variety and try that elsewhere. I have heard great things about it from a lot of sources - I just think circumstances were odd. I also grabbed a bottle of SoyGel but haven't tried it yet. I'll probably end up saving it for interior work. The guy at the salvage place raved about it so who knows.

As far as what doesn't work on the ceiling:
sanding - manual or a disc on a drill (Gator product - haven't dried some of their others)
spyder scrapers (works great on flat surfaces that aren't above my head)
manual scraping (owww)

Thanks for the feedback. Depending on what the painter says I may end up doing a crap job to meet the appraisers list and redo it properly over the summer.

The house isn't in a historic overlay and the neighborhood isn't too snooty so the vinyl wouldn't be an issue at the moment but I'd much rather keep wood if possible.

housepaintingny 04-03-2012 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 888902)
You might investigate Peel Away, a stripping system where you apply a gel type stripper then apply a layer of paper, allow it to set, then peel it off. Ideally, you're pulling everything off down to bare wood. It might be tedious applying it to t&g, but what about removing nasty alligatored paint from t&g isn't? I used it mega years ago with mixed results, but the guy I was working for at that time wasn't known for either doing things by the book or allowing things time to work, or dry. I've seen excellent results on This Old House, where they removed 100 years of paint down to bare wood. I've also heard glowing anectdotal experiences as well. Check it out. Any possibility beats dry scraping overhead, ugh.

Peel Away is a great product. You have to be carefull with the original peel away, as its caustic and will burn a hole in your skin. I usually use Pell Away Smart Strip Pro, as its not as caustic and safer to work with. We usually spray it on.


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