Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-27-2012, 08:34 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Question

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Hi,

I am planning on painting a few rooms in my house and I was wondering if you could please help me in achieving this. The rooms I am planning on painting are the laundry room, living room, and family room.

What are some tools that I might need in order to achieve a nice paint job? Last night, I bought a paint brush comb, Purdy angular paint brush (Poly/Nylon, mid-stiffness), a few 3/8" nap roller covers, and a gallon of paint (I was planning on using Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore paint since I didn't really like the Lowes/Home Depot brands). Are there any other tools that I will need?

I was wondering if I could use the angular paint brush to make a crisp line along the trim? I was hoping that I could skip the painter's tape step. Is that achievable?

I've read about the techniques of cutting in. With an angular brush, can I just paint parallel with the trim to form a crisp line? Or do I need to first do a few perpendicular (to the trim) strokes with a final parallel stroke?

Finally, should I cut in around the trim, wall corners, and ceiling first before using the roller? Can I cut in the entire room first or should I cut in on one wall before continuing?

Sorry for the bombardment of questions. I truly appreciate you taking the time to read this and hopefully lead me to a great paint job!

dajonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 08:49 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 27,518
Rewards Points: 4,152
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


You did also buy a paint pan right?
I'm cheap so I use the wide HD aluminum foil as a paint liner so it speeds up cleaning the pan.
I also hope you did not buy cheap roller covers, those cheap green ones work great if you going for a fuzz covered wall.
Cut in and paint the ceiling first. (flat paint)
Cut in and paint all the trim.
Cut in and then paint the walls.

Do not dip the brush into the paint any more then about 3/4".
Do not wipe it on the side of the can after dipping, just gentle tap the ferrel (the metal band holding in the brushes) on the side of the can and slightly twist the brush as your moving toward the wall to prevent dripping.
Does not make much since to dip it in then wipe all the paint off the brush.

As far as what angle to hold the sash brush It's all in the wrist. Practice, practice. after one wall you will have it down pat. Just take your time until you get used to it. You should be able to cut in without any tape.

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 09:21 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,113
Rewards Points: 1,482
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


My wife is the painter because I despise painting. She quit the tape long ago and depends on a good quality sash brush.

You will need a drop cloth, a ladder or scaffolding, plastic wrap for your brush at day's end ( or clean it ) , old painting clothes and by all means don't forget that high speed paint rolling can spatter a good pair of eye glasses. Take frequent breaks to stand back and admire your work.

Did I mention I hate to paint.
SeniorSitizen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 09:48 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,785
Rewards Points: 1,084
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Before opening and stirring any paint, I will generally "dry paint" a room; basically a matter of looking around the room, visualizing each step, including ladder placement, where I will set my can or paint tray when it comes time to move the ladder, whether I have adequate space around furniture to move my ladder, etc. Sometimes it is a quick "yup, no problem" situation, and other times I might grab a tape measure or other aid, just to ensure that once I start painting I can continue, without having to move furniture, etc. Obviously, there are times that moving furniture in the process may be unavoidable, but the key, in my mind, is to minimize the disruptions, if not eliminate them altogether. Sometimes, if I have a tricky transition around a staircase or whatever, I will grab a dry brush that I think I might want to use, and actually run it over the area that I think might be difficult, just to make sure that my knuckles, forearm, or whatever are not going to drag across something that I might have otherwise planned to paint first.
DexterII is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 10:36 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,741
Rewards Points: 2,518
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Yes your brush will be fine for cutting in including the trim. The blue tape thing and sharp lines will depend on how steady your hand is.
Cut in parallel to your trim.
Cut in before you paint the entire room and only do one wall at a time so you can keep a wet edge. When you roll the room get as close to the trim and ceiling as you can or you will get what is called ghosting (it will be lighter where you cut)
One more thing if you are getting splatter your rolling to fast. Hope this helps.
ToolSeeker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 10:57 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,646
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


i always go over the wall with a wide drywall knife to scrape all the boogers off from previous paintings. sometimes it helps to give it a quick sand with a sanding pole to knock down any lumps in the previous paint jobs.
DannyT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 12:11 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Thank you very much for the responses!

Yes, I have a paint pan, but did not buy the disposable linings. I don't know if I got a good or bad roller cover, but mine is blue from Lowes...

I do need to inspect the room more closely and make repairs wherever necessary (ie, caulk, patch, etc). Thanks for reminding me!

That's a good idea about the drywall knife. I don't think I need to sand it since it's just a white wall, but knocking down lumps is a great idea!

What exactly is a "wet edge"?
dajonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 12:35 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,741
Rewards Points: 2,518
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Quote:
Originally Posted by dajonx View Post
Thank you very much for the responses!

Yes, I have a paint pan, but did not buy the disposable linings. I don't know if I got a good or bad roller cover, but mine is blue from Lowes...

I do need to inspect the room more closely and make repairs wherever necessary (ie, caulk, patch, etc). Thanks for reminding me!

That's a good idea about the drywall knife. I don't think I need to sand it since it's just a white wall, but knocking down lumps is a great idea!

What exactly is a "wet edge"?
A wet edge means don't let your paint dry and then go back over it, this can cause streaking and it's easy to do if you try to cut in to big an area.
ToolSeeker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 02:05 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


So just to clarify, I cut in and then go over with a small roller while the paint is wet...?
dajonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 02:33 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,741
Rewards Points: 2,518
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Not right away but if you see it is starting to dry then start your rolling.
Depending on the size of the room this can be a challenge that's why a lot of the time there are 2 painters 1 to cut 1 to roll. Of course this is not as much of an issue if your doing 2 coats. just don't get to far ahead of yourself.
ToolSeeker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 04:53 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Ok, thank you very much!
dajonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2012, 05:34 PM   #12
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,843
Rewards Points: 2,194
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Take the 3/8 back and get a 1/2 in cover
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
princelake (10-07-2012)
Old 09-27-2012, 05:41 PM   #13
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Need to clean the walls and ceiling and big car wash sponges come in handy for that. You will need some nice soft cloths too. Old washcloths work well or you can buy a bag of terry ones fairly cheap.

You will probably need to caulk between trim and walls. Buy decent caulk and pay the money for a decent gun that ratchets nicely. I like the ones that rotate.

Get a decent roller handle. I really liked the ones with the plastic fins that really gripped the roller cover. Having a roller cover that tries to slip of the end is not productive. Do fold the fins back and forth a few times or you will spend an hour trying to get the cover off.

Heavy plastic roller pans worked out better for me than metal ones. No need for a liner with waterbased paints and they had better shapes available.

A painter's five or nine and one (whatever) tool is a must. And please use a decent paint can opener and not a screwdriver!

For painting ceilings, a nice sturdy roller extension handle is nice to have. Those of us who did it for a living had nice aluminum ones but you can get can a nice wood one or even one of those three part things you put together. Just ignore the cheap ones with plastic fittings.

Plastic razor blades come in handy.

As for painter's tape? You will need wide masking tape to paint between baseboards and carpeting. Up to you and your skill level whether to use painter's tape elsewhere. I didn't use it much because it always took longer to clean up after it than just cutting in with a nice sash brush.

If you must buy plastic tarps, get the heavy ones. The light ones are hard to maneuver and they tear. There is a reason most of us used canvas ones. I hate it when little paint glops dry, pop off the plastic, and end up everywhere.

Buy yourself some smaller paint containers to carry up in the air with you on a ladder. If you spill a pint of paint you can probably clean it up. Spilling a a gallon would be a drag. The paint store will have expensive things that are nice. Something like a dollar store will have all kinds with lids in the kitchen section.

Have fans handy if you need them to speed paint drying or just for ventilation. If you are using paints with solvents think about an aspirator if you are sensitive.

Prep your entire area. There is nothing worse than remnants of fido or fifi blowing off the floor and sticking to fresh paint. Vacuum carefully near all the baseboards.

My work bag had a nice but cheap little screwdriver/nutdriver set for getting all kinds of coverplates off. You promise not to paint over them right!? I always stuck the screws for switchplates back in the outlet or switch so I did not have to worry where they got kicked to later.

Plastic bags come in handy for cover light fixtures.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 08:45 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Thank you very much for all of the advice!

So I painted the laundry room and I found out that I am HORRIBLE at cutting in. Maybe I'm not putting enough paint on the brush...? That's something I REALLY need to work on... I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong though...
dajonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:50 AM   #15
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Questions About Paint Tools and Paint


Quote:
Originally Posted by dajonx View Post
Thank you very much for all of the advice!

So I painted the laundry room and I found out that I am HORRIBLE at cutting in. Maybe I'm not putting enough paint on the brush...? That's something I REALLY need to work on... I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong though...
It's funny but I would say that so long as they are using the right quality tools (correct size brush and roller cover nap), the most common mistake DIYers--- and especially first timers---make is not saturating brushes or roller covers with enough paint and what they are perfectly designed to hold. So people put a little paint on a roller cover, take it to the wall and then go into hyperspeed mode splattering paint everywhere but on the wall. You have to give the tools a chance to do the work for you. I does take time to get the feel for how they should perform. You also cannot get a grip on it with crappy box store paint and you hear many of us go on about this for that very reason.

You obviously do not want to go crazy and drag a dripping brush to work surface or fill it all the way to where the bristles join the handle since those parts of the bristles above where you fill the brush with paint are doing a special job they can only do without paint.

I learned to paint by watching some crusty old masters at it and frankly from practice. I liked what I saw and painting so I decided I wanted to be good at it. I would like to think I passed the skill set on and no in one instance, I trained a trim painter who will forever be better and faster than me at it. She was a delight to work with too. Anyhow, anybody who suggests they got "cutting in" or painting trim the first few times is lying to you through their teeth even if they are dressed in new, immaculate and divinely clean whites. We all started exactly where you are. For me it helped to know how a paint brush works and does it magic but such knowledge is not required.

My technique, learned from this crazy old cigar smoking coot, was to feed paint down to the tip of my sash brush evenly by kind of sort of vibrating it as I go when cutting in. Flow is even and perfect but some watching always ask why my hand is shaking so much.

So, give yourself some credit. It will come to you faster than you think if you stick with it and just practice. At least cutting in mistakes are generally easy and cheap to fix.

And you are sort of a quasi-bubba now. You asked how to do it right, took your best shot, and you got er done!


Last edited by user1007; 10-01-2012 at 10:00 AM.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to user1007 For This Useful Post:
ToolSeeker (10-01-2012)
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the problem with washing paint tools in sink? Eagle One Painting 11 05-31-2012 07:10 AM
Cleaning paint tools bad for drains? darsunt Painting 5 05-27-2012 02:24 PM
Painting a room for new baby. Lots of questions. SuperAkuma Painting 15 01-01-2009 11:18 AM
Exterior paint questions Sears Ultra WB and how many gallons? snosurfa7 Painting 6 05-13-2008 11:42 PM
Removing spray paint from tools harold938 General DIY Discussions 15 12-17-2006 08:16 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.