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Old 12-01-2010, 12:28 AM   #1
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Question about using Kilz Original


Hello all,

We're getting ready to paint and will be using Kilz Original oil-based primer on the walls and ceiling because the previous owner of our new house was a pretty heavy smoker. We've mostly neutralized the smell of smoke by removing the carpets, cleaning the ducts, and running an ozone machine; now we're just ready to paint.

We've been advised to turn off our pilot lights on the furnace and hot water heater due to the vapor from the Kilz. We will be painting with all the windows open and fans running to keep the area ventilated, and will also be wearing respirators so the fumes shouldn't be a problem. My question is how long after we've applied the Kilz do we need to keep the pilot lights off? During the day it will be in the mid 50's outside and in the 40s at night so we don't really want to have to leave the heat off at night.

Also, how long should can we wait between applying the primer and the topcoat? We'd like to do 2 layers of Kilz to make sure we stop stains from coming to the surface but we don't want to have to do the primer and the topcoat in the same day. I've seen a couple different answers ranging from as soon as possible to within 48 hours. If we could do all the priming during the day when it's warmer, and then come back in a day or two after work and do the final painting that would be great.

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Old 12-01-2010, 05:50 AM   #2
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Question about using Kilz Original


Forget the Kilz. Use Zinsser B-I-N instead. It's an alcohol based primer instead of oil. It dries faster, the fumes dissipate quicker and it's a better stain blocker for what you are trying to do. You most likely won't need more than one coat of B-I-N. You can topcoat it in about an hour with a latex paint.

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Old 12-01-2010, 06:16 AM   #3
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Question about using Kilz Original


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Old 12-01-2010, 06:48 AM   #4
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Question about using Kilz Original


If we did switch to BIN would those same questions still apply? We're doing the whole house, walls and ceilings both, so we want to make sure the pilot light isn't an issue.
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Old 12-01-2010, 07:39 AM   #5
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Question about using Kilz Original


BIN (white pigmented shellac) or KILZ either one has some hella fumes. I've never heard the pilot light issue but it can't hurt. I think Kilz can be recoated in 45 minutes to an hour and BIN (which painters call Bullseye shellac) 30 minutes or so. Check the can.

You don't have to apply the topcoats immediately. One, two, several days or a week is OK.

R U rolling or spraying? For a job like you describe I'd fire up my airless and blow and go.

Windows and doors open and fans running is the best course. Suck the air to the OUTSIDE. Cut in everything in each room before you start rolling and start at the furthest point back of each room and work your way out. It's gonna get "THICK" in there.

You might want to invest in an activated carbon cartridge paint mask.

BTW, BIN cleans up with alcohol and Kilz with mineral spirits.

Where are the pilot lights located? In a separate room? A utility closet? The garage? Basement?

It would take several days of below zero temps to do any damage to the house. 40
degrees won't hurt for a couple days.

Last edited by hoz49; 12-01-2010 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 12-01-2010, 10:51 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by hoz49 View Post

You might want to invest in an activated carbon cartridge paint mask.
Most definitely.
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Old 12-01-2010, 11:48 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by hoz49 View Post
BIN (white pigmented shellac) or KILZ either one has some hella fumes. I've never heard the pilot light issue but it can't hurt. I think Kilz can be recoated in 45 minutes to an hour and BIN (which painters call Bullseye shellac) 30 minutes or so. Check the can.

You don't have to apply the topcoats immediately. One, two, several days or a week is OK.

R U rolling or spraying? For a job like you describe I'd fire up my airless and blow and go.

Windows and doors open and fans running is the best course. Suck the air to the OUTSIDE. Cut in everything in each room before you start rolling and start at the furthest point back of each room and work your way out. It's gonna get "THICK" in there.

You might want to invest in an activated carbon cartridge paint mask.

BTW, BIN cleans up with alcohol and Kilz with mineral spirits.

Where are the pilot lights located? In a separate room? A utility closet? The garage? Basement?

It would take several days of below zero temps to do any damage to the house. 40
degrees won't hurt for a couple days.
Thanks for the good info!

The furnace & water heater are in a closet in a room that was formerly a garage. We don't have a sprayer so we'll be doing it with rollers.

About how long do you think the Kilz would still off-gas after it was applied? My wife is paranoid about blowing up the house since something similar happened to a neighbor when she was a kid.
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Old 12-01-2010, 12:06 PM   #8
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Usually I spray BIN or Kilz for insurance work. ( Burn Outs mostly). But I have from time to time cut and rolled the product. Work very fast. make sure you leave no fat edge lines. Work fast. Oh I said that already. Ventilate rooms very well. Charcoal respirator is a must!!!!!!!!! IT would take a large amount of fog in a room fir it to ignite with a pilot lite.
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Old 12-01-2010, 12:53 PM   #9
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Question about using Kilz Original


If the pilot lights are in a separate room, and you can close that room off from the rest of the house, and you can ventilate that room separately, I wouldn't worry about flash over from the fumes.

If you have never done this type of work before I suspect you are going to be fumed out in short order. You will probably take 2-3 days to prime the entire house. Be careful, headaches, dizziness and even nausea can come rather quickly.

If you start to feel woozy get some fresh air immediately.

Last edited by hoz49; 12-01-2010 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 12-01-2010, 04:28 PM   #10
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Question about using Kilz Original


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Originally Posted by poppameth View Post
Forget the Kilz. Use Zinsser B-I-N instead. It's an alcohol based primer instead of oil. It dries faster, the fumes dissipate quicker and it's a better stain blocker for what you are trying to do. You most likely won't need more than one coat of B-I-N. You can topcoat it in about an hour with a latex paint.

There you go!
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Old 12-01-2010, 06:15 PM   #11
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Question about using Kilz Original


If you're set on Kilz Original I can understand. It's some tough stuff. "Made strong to last long". But Kilz also makes an acrylic product that doesn't stink to high heaven. If the Original kicks your axx try Kilz Premium.

http://www.masterchem.com/masterchem...006b0910acRCRD

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Old 12-02-2010, 05:55 AM   #12
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Question about using Kilz Original


Kilz primers as a rule are pretty bad products. Only the original is any good at all. The acrylic is prone to problems. In this case an Acrylic is not the best product for the job anyway. You'll put on several coats trying to get it to cover.
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Old 12-02-2010, 06:23 AM   #13
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Question about using Kilz Original


I agree the Original is the way to go, but have you tried the Premium?
A 1 gallon can weighs almost 5 lbs! It has a lot of pigment.

I am trying to give the OP other options in case he finds himself fume drunk with a throbbing headache and unable to continue.
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:12 AM   #14
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Question about using Kilz Original


Quote:
Originally Posted by poppameth View Post
Forget the Kilz. Use Zinsser B-I-N instead. It's an alcohol based primer instead of oil. It dries faster, the fumes dissipate quicker and it's a better stain blocker for what you are trying to do. You most likely won't need more than one coat of B-I-N. You can topcoat it in about an hour with a latex paint.
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Old 12-02-2010, 03:03 PM   #15
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Question about using Kilz Original


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Originally Posted by hoz49 View Post
I agree the Original is the way to go, but have you tried the Premium?
A 1 gallon can weighs almost 5 lbs! It has a lot of pigment.

I am trying to give the OP other options in case he finds himself fume drunk with a throbbing headache and unable to continue.
Yep used it once for a lady that has some residue from a gas log fireplace. She insisted on the Kilz Premium. Three coats later the walls finally stopped bleeding through. That was after washing the walls down with Dirtex. Had two more walls in the same room and finally switched to BIN. One coat and done.

Solids content isn't the only thing you need to worry about.


Last edited by poppameth; 12-02-2010 at 07:03 PM.
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