DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   Question about paint/primer selection (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/question-about-paint-primer-selection-76906/)

oldbarn 07-23-2010 01:59 PM

Question about paint/primer selection
 
I am restoring a 3 stall (oak I believe) small horse barn that is something of a family heirloom. It is in the beginning stages at the moment and I need a little bit of advice, as I am somewhat new to this. I have been told already that the existing paint (2 layers probably oil based) is in good enough condition to skip scraping/stripping, and am going to be washing with bleach and water tomorrow to clean it up a bit. Then I will sand it as much as I can bear, and level the unpainted areas with putty. But I was advised to use an oil based primerfor best adherence, then put on two coats of Pratt & Lambert or other top quality paint. But my question is for price effectiveness (the barn is around 900 sq. ft. and I don't want to spend $300 just on paint and primer if I don't have to) could I use say Behr Barn & Fence/Ace Barn & Fence Latexwith an oil based primer? Or do you have to use an oil paint with oil primer? Any recommendations or advice is appreciated.

Here is a link to a picture of the barn:
http://i131.photobucket.com/albums/p...IMG00039-1.jpg

Thanks

mark942 07-24-2010 05:54 AM

Sounds to me like you have talked to some one that gave you some very sound advice. Spend the money and enjoy the rewards of knowing you will not have any troubles in the near future...............Good Luck.............:thumbsup:

By putty, you mean Spackle right?

hennyh 07-24-2010 07:51 AM

I'd use a top quality long oil primer and give it a healthy dose of Penetrol. Have the paint store tint it to half the formula of the top coat to give you a head start with coverage.

Use a good quality acrylic paint. P&L is my favorite paint but you might be able to save a few buck by getting one of SW's or BM's value paints.

You can often get excellent value by considering regional paints. (ex: Miller, California, Dunn Edwards, Kelly Moore, etc)

Skip Home Crapo/Lowes/KMart/etc and go to a real paint store.

housepaintingny 07-24-2010 12:20 PM

You can skip primining if you use a quality solid stain, Cabott, SW Woodscapes, or Sikkens

Matthewt1970 07-24-2010 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by housepaintingny (Post 474510)
You can skip primining if you use a quality solid stain, Cabott, SW Woodscapes, or Sikkens

I think you missed the part where he says there is already oil based paint on there.

oldbarn 07-25-2010 07:19 PM

thanks henny, I am researching primers as of now, still working on sanding (its hot wearing those coveralls and half face respirator in the middle of summer!) I like the sound of Benjamin Moore Fresh Start Penetrating Oil Primer, sounds like exactly what you recommended right? Any experience with this product? Have to wait until tomorrow for pricing, as all of the BM dealers were closed on Sunday, go figure. But SW has an Oil based Exterior Wood Primer for around $40 per gallon. I guess those are my main options. I have heard of Penetrol, but how do I use it? on its own brushed in? or is it a thinner? and at what stage is it applied? I am also looking into the future with topcoat selection, Glidden seems to have high marks for being a cheaper paint, but I am scared after everybody around here recommending the top shelf stuff. Honestly this doesn't have to be perfect, just last for a decent while, I don't want it to start peeling and bubbling after 2 years ya know? Can anyone tell me the average roundabout price of say a decent BM Exterior acrylic asopposed to a SW/Duron or a Pratt & Lambert? Nobody advertises prices on paint it seems, you have to actually call or go to the store, bringing me back to the old days here hah!...
Well any further help is greatly appreciated!

chrisn 07-26-2010 01:38 AM

I have heard of Penetrol, but how do I use it?
It is mixed in with you're oil primer.
Either of the primers you mentioned will do the job.
You do not want to " cheap out" on the finish paint after all you're hard work. I would personally go with Duron Weather Shield, it is a very good paint( I have used it on my own home for over 20 years) and not as expensive as BM.I have never used SW, so cannot comment on that.

hennyh 07-26-2010 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldbarn (Post 475230)
thanks henny, I am researching primers as of now, still working on sanding (its hot wearing those coveralls and half face respirator in the middle of summer!) I like the sound of Benjamin Moore Fresh Start Penetrating Oil Primer, sounds like exactly what you recommended right? Any experience with this product? Have to wait until tomorrow for pricing, as all of the BM dealers were closed on Sunday, go figure.

I'm sure that product would perform just fine. (BM has yet to let me down).

Long oil primers are penetrating. You want the oil in the primer to soak deep into the wood and attach to the fibers of the wood. Penetrol helps them do that.

I'm generally not a fan of paint additives but this one works well when the surface you're priming has lots of raw wood.

oldbarn 07-31-2010 06:44 PM

Thanks for everyones help on this project, this really has come in handy so far. chrisn: I checked at my local SW for the Duron WeatherShield, and they couldn't tint it to my chosen color (hunter green) so I'm going to use SW Superpaint in flat, decent price and pretty stellar reviews everywhere. I comapred prices between SW & BM's exterior oil primers and there was a $10 price difference per gallon, so I'm going to go with the SW, can't be THAT much of a difference. And for the doors (dutch doors and side door) and trim I'm just using A-100 in a satin white. So as for the prep, it's coming along, I have washed 3 sides with bleach & water, and then I found TSP and did the last side with that. Then I started sanding with 100 (medium) grit, all over, very strenuous work. I'm about 95% done now. So I guess my unanswered questions are am I ready to prime? should I wash the whole barn down with TSP or bleach one more time beforfe priming? or wipe it down to remove excess dust? Should I sand it again with finer grit? or was the 100 enough? It feels pretty smooth now. Thanks for the help!

chrisn 08-01-2010 05:33 AM

No more sanding needed, but you will have to give it a good rinse to remove any dust and residual tsp, let it dry well and prime away.:thumbsup:

oldbarn 08-01-2010 08:07 PM

chrisn: thanks for the advice, I will finish up the remaining sanding, then give it a good wash down with the "power wash" setting on my watering nozzle, i think it'll be enough pressure. Do you think it's decent weather to be starting the painting process? I've just heard that fall may be the opportune time to prime/paint due to the low humidity, but if it won't make a difference I'll go ahead and get it done. Also, it says on the primer can that I need to apply a topcoat within 2 weeks of priming, why is this? Thanks man :thumbsup:

chrisn 08-02-2010 02:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldbarn (Post 478924)
chrisn: thanks for the advice, I will finish up the remaining sanding, then give it a good wash down with the "power wash" setting on my watering nozzle, i think it'll be enough pressure. Do you think it's decent weather to be starting the painting process? I've just heard that fall may be the opportune time to prime/paint due to the low humidity, but if it won't make a difference I'll go ahead and get it done. Also, it says on the primer can that I need to apply a topcoat within 2 weeks of priming, why is this? Thanks man :thumbsup:

You can go ahead and paint, just make sure it is dry first thing in the morning and no dew is present.Oil primer is just ment to be painted within a couple weeks, why?I don't know, it's a chemistry thing and I was not so good at that many years ago.:laughing:


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:27 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved