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Old 06-24-2013, 10:49 AM   #1
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Primer Suggestion


I need a primer recommendation. I'm looking at repainting some interior walls that currently have semi-gloss paint on them. I'll be using BM Regal Select eggshell for the finish coat.

thanks!
Dan

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Old 06-24-2013, 11:45 AM   #2
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What is going on with the walls that you need a primer? Are you changing deep colors or something? Is the semi an oil based in which case an alkyd primer in between might be a good idea if switching to a waterbased product. If the paint has chalked or otherwise aged a primer might be indicated.

If a normal situation, just sand the walls with fine grit paper and a poll sander to give tooth or adhesion. Clean with a damp cloth and some TSP. Apply two coats of your finish over the top.

A primer coat certainly will not hurt but might be a time an money expense you do not need?

Spot primer any repairs of course or they could flash through your finish.

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Old 06-24-2013, 01:13 PM   #3
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Primer Suggestion


The walls are a deep very dark blue color and we will be going with something much lighter in color. The walls themselves are very beat up: nail holes, gouges, divots all over the walls. It's a bedroom and belonged to a teen before. I don't think I have ever seen walls so beat up. The semi-gloss paint makes the imperfections look even worse of course…

So being that I wanted to go with a lighter color, the walls are currently semi-gloss AND I'd have lots and lots of spot repairs on the walls (sorry - should have put that in my original post) I wanted to prime all the walls prior to painting.

Any suggestions on what to use??
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Old 06-24-2013, 01:44 PM   #4
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I would patch all the holes and so forth and skim coat walls as necessary, then prime with waterbased Zinsser 123 or Zinsser 123+ (somewhat new formula with stain blocker) if stains are in issue. Waterbased Ben Moore Fresh Start would be another possibility but it is quite a bit more expensive and Zinsser primers are great.

If there is lots of tape (you mentioned it was a teenagers room so I am guessing their were posters) Gardz might be a better choice to at least spot seal residue you cannot get off with Goo Gone or whatever. If any stains are serious, something like Zinsser Cover Stain or Ben Moore's Fresh Start alkyd primer would be my choice. They are both solvent based. If smoking was an issue, Zinsser Cover Stain or to be sure, BIN would be the products of my choice.

You can tint the primer 40 percent or so of the chosen paint formula if you want. You will still need two coats of finish though. You should still scruff up the whole semi-gloss surface with fine sandpaper even if using a primer.

Make sure you have adequate ventilation down under there! Especially so if using solvent primers or an alcohol based primer like BIN.

As you noted, the higher the gloss the more any surface imperfections will show.

Last edited by user1007; 06-24-2013 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 06-28-2013, 06:08 PM   #5
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Primer Suggestion


Use Zinsser Bulls Eye 123 water based primer, it works great.

Good Luck!
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:39 AM   #6
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Personally I'd scuff sand the entire surface first. Second, I'd patch the walls and then spot sand over those spots. There is no need to prime the scuff-sanded areas, but if you have so much patching to do that's it's no more trouble, you could coat the entire surface quickly. In that case I wouldn't bother cutting in with primer though.
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Old 07-02-2013, 01:09 PM   #7
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I dont know why you would want to sand the walls when you have to do a lot of patch work which will have to be primed anyway. I would dimple all the deficiencies, do all the patch work with drywall compound, then prime all the walls with a good primer, then paint. Not understanding the comprehensive sanding, other than sanding the DW compound. I thought the primer would give you all the grab you need.
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Old 07-02-2013, 01:23 PM   #8
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The wall has semi gloss paint on it. Perhaps that's why the recommendation to sand prior to priming???
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:32 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
I thought the primer would give you all the grab you need.
All coatings adhere to rougher surfaces than smooth, shiny ones. As chrisn says, primers solve problems. Identify the problems. One problem is drywall patching compound causes flashing. A sealing drywall primer solves this problem. Another problem is that a coating will not stick as well to semi-gloss surfaces as to deglossed, "flat" surfaces. Yes, they make primers that adhere better to slick surfaces, but why bother? The problem is more quickly and cheaply solved with a quick scuff sanding, than it is with a primer. It is going to take a homeowner at least $25 and at least 1 hour if not 2 to prime a room. On the other hand it would $2 in sandpaper and 20-30 minutes to scuff sand it.
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:46 PM   #10
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[QUOTE=jeffnc;1210430]Personally I'd scuff sand the entire surface first. Second, I'd patch the walls and then spot sand over those spots. There is no need to prime the scuff-sanded areas, but if you have so much patching to do that's it's no more trouble, you could coat the entire surface quickly. In that case I wouldn't bother cutting in with primer though.[/QUOTE]


This is why you are not a professional painter and should keep such nonsense to yourself.
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:47 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
All coatings adhere to rougher surfaces than smooth, shiny ones. As chrisn says, primers solve problems. Identify the problems. One problem is drywall patching compound causes flashing. A sealing drywall primer solves this problem. Another problem is that a coating will not stick as well to semi-gloss surfaces as to deglossed, "flat" surfaces. Yes, they make primers that adhere better to slick surfaces, but why bother? The problem is more quickly and cheaply solved with a quick scuff sanding, than it is with a primer. It is going to take a homeowner at least $25 and at least 1 hour if not 2 to prime a room. On the other hand it would $2 in sandpaper and 20-30 minutes to scuff sand it.

brush says that, not me

although I agree
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:52 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by dschribs View Post
I need a primer recommendation. I'm looking at repainting some interior walls that currently have semi-gloss paint on them. I'll be using BM Regal Select eggshell for the finish coat.

thanks!
Dan

Do all the patching , sanding that is needed. Clean off the dust. Prime the entire wall with Zinsser 123, Fresh Start, or other quality primer. Repair all need flaws that show up, clean the dust off. Spot prime those repairs. Apply the 2 finish coats

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