Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2012, 11:01 PM   #16
(the original)
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: long beach, ms
Posts: 520
Share |
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Quote:
Originally Posted by All thumb's View Post
that stuff is made for pre painted hard to cover colors. Not new drywall.
Really? Maybe you should read their tech sheets sometime, especially the part that says "primes uncoated and painted surfaces"........ya think?

ratherbefishin' is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2012, 11:29 PM   #17
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Aberdeen Wa
Posts: 11
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Quote:
Originally Posted by ratherbefishin' View Post
Really? Maybe you should read their tech sheets sometime, especially the part that says "primes uncoated and painted surfaces"........ya think?
Any one can under stand the need for a good primer.
All thumb's is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 03:39 PM   #18
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 18
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


I like to use B-I-N primer sealer (zinsser) on new drywall for all my wet areas i.e. bathrooms where humidity can cause problems. Especially since not many folks use the fart fan to pull the wet air out.
But yeah, primer & paint in one is a gimmick that I've seen bite people in the butt.

Last edited by behumble; 06-12-2012 at 03:42 PM. Reason: forgot something
behumble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 04:56 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 41
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Do you see anything wrong with using the hybrid primer-paint on bare drywall? I have done that on a couple walls. (I had been first applying B-I-N or BM's primer on most of the drywall but ran out late at night and thought what the heck...)

Plus another oops. For part of a ceiling I grabbed a can of ceiling paint thinking it was a primer and painted the fresh drywall with it - without having primed/sealed it first. Besides the obvious "flashing", will I have problems? Can one simply prime over the area and then repaint?

Can any instance of flashing on painted walls simply be primed/sealed over and then re-painted?

^behumble, actually, in bathrooms isn't the critical part the 'surface coating' and not the underlying primer? Or does porosity allow moisture to travel through any paint to reach the underlying drywall? Again, couldn't one "prime/seal" at any point (i.e. even over old painted surfaces) to prevent that possibility?

Last edited by KinNorth; 06-12-2012 at 05:01 PM.
KinNorth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 05:18 PM   #20
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Kin- Welcome here you have come on strong with your pink link!!
lol
It is not "wrong" to use the P & P n new rock. It works. But if you look around at other threads, our ( the pro guys) main problem with the whole concept is that there are many reasons to use a primer, sealing new rock is just the most basic. The P & P doesn't come close to doing all the things that the right primer for the right problem will do.
I would also think to BIN out a bath as a matter of course is WAY overkill.
a good acrylic primer sealer and a quality eggshell and you're good to go.

You probably just need another coat of your ceiling paint too.
On smooth ceilings there are both technique and primer considerations that might work the best, particularly with critical light. Ceilings can be much harder to get right than one would think..
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2012, 06:06 PM   #21
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 18
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


the problem I've seen w/ p+p is with adhesion- especially over the tape joints and nails "plaster" so dont let folks pick at it : ) - pva primer is cheap and effective
behumble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2012, 12:34 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Pacific North west
Posts: 1,186
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


The new building energy code for were I live and work is non faced insulation coat of PVA primer then texture then 2nd coat of PVA primer to meet the vapor retarder. then do two coats of paint
Nailbags is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2012, 08:55 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 41
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Kin- Welcome here you have come on strong with your pink link!!
lol
It is not "wrong" to use the P & P n new rock. It works. But if you look around at other threads, our ( the pro guys) main problem with the whole concept is that there are many reasons to use a primer, sealing new rock is just the most basic. The P & P doesn't come close to doing all the things that the right primer for the right problem will do.
I would also think to BIN out a bath as a matter of course is WAY overkill.
a good acrylic primer sealer and a quality eggshell and you're good to go.

You probably just need another coat of your ceiling paint too.
On smooth ceilings there are both technique and primer considerations that might work the best, particularly with critical light. Ceilings can be much harder to get right than one would think..
Thanks for the info.!

:-)

My pink link. ...but no one seems able to answer the question.

I WILL NOT THINK PINK!...but for RETRO effect.
KinNorth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2012, 06:35 AM   #24
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 3
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


I have used Behr's paint and prime in one several times with mixed results.

For flat paints it has been fine for new work including going over joint compound, etc and has held up well.

However with the semi-gloss there have times when there was a bonding problem going over things like redi-patch and I have had to go back scrape it off and prime.

When a new game changing technology arrives, invariably the old timers who have done it for years the old fashion way will scoff at it.

Im not saying that paint and prime in one is another example, but it does play with that. The possibility of removing the primer stage is a true game changer saving a lot of time and money.

That being said, I am about to paint my whole house with a sprayer that has new walls and plenty of joint compound dust I am trying to remove. As tempted as I am to go with the primer-in-one. I will probably prime as to not take any chances, especially since we will probably be using an egg shell or satin. If it was flat I might go for it.
Genshu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2012, 06:53 AM   #25
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


I want to just make this clear for other people reading this- the primer/ paint thing does not cut out a step. It's just the first coat of the p/p is acting like a primer, you still need another coat or two to make it look good.
It does cut out getting 2 products, but since a primer that is meant for the job costs around $20 a gal and Behr Ultra is around $40, you decide which is the most cost effective...
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
Will22 (06-19-2012)
Old 06-19-2012, 10:25 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 320
Default

The "primer in the paint" Phenomenon


Agree, Brushjockey. Self -priming premium paints are still a 2-coat process, although many consumers do not see it this way. Drastic color changes, ferrous metal situations, or stain blocking require speciatly primers- this is noted on the product labels. As you say, the cost decision is the choice for the applicator or homeowner.

Will22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.