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kapowilicious 08-26-2013 01:17 AM

Primer for interior painted walls? Lots of painting questions...
 
I'm getting ready to paint my walls (I guess you could say this will be my first REAL painting experience). The home is fairly new, and the current paint job was done by professionals when the home was built. Anyway, I can't figure out if I should prime them first. The living room is currently painted a flat, darker teal color, and I want to take it to a very light robin's egg color. The kitchen has a semi-gloss yellow, and I plan on painting that white. The TV room is a flat light blue, and I want that to be tan.

While using google to try to figure out if I should prime, I read that if you are going from dark to light it can be helpful to use a coat of white primer before you start with your real paint (various sites say this can save money because primer is less expensive than paint...).

Should I prime, and if so, can I get away with a really cheap primer or does that defeat the purpose of using a primer at all? (I'll need it to stick over the bright yellow semi-gloss in the kitchen, after all).

I saw this 5-gallon at Menard's, not sure if it is a waste of money: http://www.menards.com/main/building...868-c-8028.htm

Second- any recommendations on decent wall paint that is reasonably priced? I want a satin or eggshell finish and I have Home Depot, Menard's and Sherwin Williams available to me.

And third- thoughts on floetrol or paint conditioner? Should I use that in my paint as well? Will it give me better results?

THANK YOU in advance for your help :)

chrisn 08-26-2013 01:24 AM

Does not sound to me as if you need any primer at all, as long as the walls are clean. You will need to lightly sand the kitchen(after cleaning) with 100 grit paper. Forget the box store paints and if SW is the ONLY real paint store you have( no ppg ?), then go with Super paint( probably a big sale next weekend), 2 full coats as always.

ToolSeeker 08-26-2013 07:11 AM

What Chris says is true but let me add a little bit. Also get your brushes and rollers and roller covers at the paint store and do not cheap out on them. You will also need drop clothes DO NOT get the plastic ones as they are very slick. You should also get a box of painters plastic it is very thin and inexpensive, use it to cover things because there will be paint splatter. If you get a lot of splatter you are rolling to fast. Another thing you will find very handy is an extension pole. I only use Flotrol and extenders for trim paint or really smooth surfaces. Are your walls textured or smooth. If fairly smooth I would use a 1/2" nap roller if textured may need to go with 3/4".

jeffnc 08-26-2013 08:43 AM

The big box stores carry good roller covers and brushes, such as Purdy and Wooster. Low splatter is another good reason for using high quality paint. The less splatter, the less covering you have to do and the less cleanup you have to do.

jeffnc 08-26-2013 08:51 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1234279)
Another thing you will find very handy is an extension pole.

Isn't it funny all the ads and pictures on products that show people rolling paint with ladders and scaffolds? This is pretty hilarious. Yes, you need a ladder or stepladder for cutting in the ceiling, but never for rolling. Going up and down a ladder to load your roller and then put it on the wall is ridiculous. An extension is the way to go.

user1007 08-26-2013 09:32 AM

Come on Jeff. The opening image for this site has a chick stretching with a long dried out roller and leaning on the work she just painted. In the slideshow she decides to hook up with the dude and both of the are leaning on, one is supposed to believe, fresh paint. I am so glad the site owners set the bar so high.

Do get a good solid, adjustable extension pole. Not some ricketly stick or those sectional things with stapled plastic fittings that cost $3 (the real sectional ones with maple handles are not a bad purchase though). I had reason to buy a sure grip roller frame and got one with a telescoping handle. Not bad for what it is.

kapowilicious 08-26-2013 10:39 AM

I checked for paint stores again and we do have a Diamond Vogel as well (hadn't heard of it before). Also have Ace Hardware selling BM.

So the consensus is: skip the primer and go directly to 2 coats of nice paint. And the paint should be Super paint by SW. Do you think 2 coats of a very light color will cover the dark teal?

Also, if I have holes to repair (there is A LOT of damage in the tv room) I assume those would need a primer. What is a good basic primer? Do I need to buy that at SW too or can I get something cheaper from a big box store?

Walls are fairly smooth with little texture.

kapowilicious 08-26-2013 10:47 AM

Also wanted to add, not 100% sure what PPG is, but if it is Pittsburgh Paints our Menards does carry some of their stuff...

kapowilicious 08-26-2013 11:26 AM

Sorry, one more thing. I don't own my home so I don't need this paint to last a lifetime. I would imagine it will be repainted within 5 years. That being said, will I still need to spend $50 / gallon for paint? Not sure how much I really want to invest in a property that isn't mine...but I can't live with the current colors much longer!

jeffnc 08-26-2013 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1234339)
The opening image for this site has a chick stretching with a long dried out roller and leaning on the work she just painted. In the slideshow..,

Oh that's funny. I didn't even know that was a slideshow. I like the way the dude is holding his roller against the wall, but there isn't any new paint on the wall on either side of the roller.

Anyway, no you don't need $50 paint necessarily, it's really a matter of hiding the old color and getting full color with the new one. How many coats that will take you depends on a lot of things, including:
- the color you're painting over
- the color you're painting with
- the final thickness of the paint film you're putting on
- the amount of solids, including titanium dioxide, in the paint
- how thickly you put it on

The 4th one is related to the 2nd one, so that might be 4 important things. But anyway, all the colors you're putting on are pale, which means if you buy a good quality paint, it will contain a lot of titanium dioxide (which is white), which is very opaque and covers those old colors well.

Let's say you want to use Benjamin Moore paint. If you use Aura, their tech sheet says the paint film will be 2.0 mils. If you use Regal, it will be 1.4 mils. If you use SuperCraft, it will be .9 mils. Which do you think needs the most coats? Which do you think is the most expensive? Next time you go to the hardware store, feel some 1 mil plastic sheeting and then feel some 2 mil sheeting. That will give you some idea of how much dried paint you're putting on your walls.

Now you know why some paint costs $50 and some paint costs $20. $20 paint has more water in it. As you can see, approximately twice as much. More water also means more splatter and more mess.

With SuperCraft paint, you might get by with 2 coats, but you could easily need 3 coats and in some cases even 4 or 5. If you use Aura, you might get by with 1, but never more than 2 (4 coats of SuperCraft is not even as thick as 2 coats of Aura). If you use Regal, in some cases you could get by with 1 but normally 2. A lot depends on how thickly you put it on. If the paint can just about cover in 1 coat instead of 2, or 2 coats instead of 3, then go ahead and roll it on generously and save yourself time.

So you can do the math and figure out how much labor time you want to put in (Aura saves you time) and how much you want to spend per gallon (SuperCraft saves you money per gallon but you'll need more gallons).

user1007 08-26-2013 03:05 PM

I would look into the contractor grades of real paint store paint. It is Promar in the Sherwin Williams line and used to be SuperSpec in the Ben Moore line but I think UltraSpec is what there are selling now. I painted lots of both over the years. You will not get the colorfastness and washability you will out of Aura but if you plan to paint within five years again anyhow it should do just fine. The Ben Moore product comes in fewer sheens than Regal or Aura but there is an adequate range for most needs. I believe both lines come in gallons of the smallest size but a gallon will cost what a quart of what Regal or Aura does .

The Pittsburgh product sold at Menard's is absolutely terrible. It drips and sags and is a real fight to get on. I have used it only when donated. Why Pittsburgh does not rebrand its box store line baffles me. It's real paint store products are fine to work with.

jeffnc 08-26-2013 03:26 PM

If you get ProMar, I would stick with ProMar 200, right on par with SuperSpec. 400 and 700 are a step down, and I think 700 only exists as a contractor option sold in 5 gal buckets. ProMar 200 is a decent middle of the road paint.

I personally haven't painted with the SuperSpec/UltraSpec paints, but according to the Benjamin Moore website, both are being sold, and UltraSpec 500 looks to be a clear step up from SuperSpec and ProMar.

ToolSeeker 08-26-2013 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kapowilicious (Post 1234364)
I checked for paint stores again and we do have a Diamond Vogel as well (hadn't heard of it before). Also have Ace Hardware selling BM.

So the consensus is: skip the primer and go directly to 2 coats of nice paint. And the paint should be Super paint by SW. Do you think 2 coats of a very light color will cover the dark teal?

Also, if I have holes to repair (there is A LOT of damage in the tv room) I assume those would need a primer. What is a good basic primer? Do I need to buy that at SW too or can I get something cheaper from a big box store?

Walls are fairly smooth with little texture.

No you do not have to use super paint from SW pro mar 200 is is a good paint at a good price Ben Moore also has good paint, as does Ace their Clark and Kensington is good paint. SW is having a 30% off sale this week-end. I guess this is a long winded answer to no you don't need $50 a gallon paint.
As far as primer Zinsser 123 or 123 plus are my go to primers or you can get your primer from the paint store but not PVC primer.
And as far as PPG yes that is Pittsburg paints as far as Menards it would probably depend on which lines they carry. Chris will tell you more about their lines it's not available where I am so I'm not as familiar with it.

ltd 08-26-2013 08:48 PM

pro mar 200 is ok paint if you chose one with a little sheen, low sheen, or eggshell.but the flat imo forget about it.also the public will not get the deep discount on the contractor lines also imo,with that said the 30% discount that's running you can get cashmere or super paint for around 35 bucks.

jeffnc 08-26-2013 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ltd (Post 1234634)
pro mar 200 is ok paint if you chose one with a little sheen, low sheen, or eggshell.but the flat imo forget about it.

Good point about the contractor discounts, but why would you say that about the flat paint? There's nothing wrong with it in my experience. Sounds like maybe you have some anecdotal feedback.


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