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Old 04-13-2011, 02:29 AM   #1
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Primer Help Needed


I've just finished spraying texture my walls (4 rooms: bathroom, hallway, living room, and kitchen). This is a remodel and I'm going over multiple surfaces (old recycled paper drywall, new drywall, topping compound, oil based paint, you name it). I did originally prime the walls with a water based epoxy primer (Vista Prime-ZALL) as I was told this would cover everything and is a "new water based equivalent to Kilz". Well, it seems to have done the trick in terms of giving the texture something to stick to and allowing it to dry evenly, but it's not blocking some of the old brown paper drywall on the ceiling. Needless to say, I've learned the hard way that I obviously need to use an oil based primer.

So my questions are:
1) Should I just stick with the epoxy primer on the walls since it seems to be blocking the stains there, or could this be a problem later with stains just coming out. Or might it also be a problem in wet areas like the bathroom/kitchen (where oil based paint was also previously used)?

2) What oil based primer should I use on the ceiling (and possibly walls)?

3) Will an oil based primer seal the texture or do I need to apply a sealer (or PVA) before/after the primer?

Thanks in advance!

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Old 04-13-2011, 06:50 AM   #2
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You can use just about any oil primer that you like. I dont know why the drywall would be "bleeding" though. Were there water stains there perhaps? If the bleeding isnt a huge area, you could spot prime those areas with oil, or even use a small rattle can, then prime with latex.

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Old 04-13-2011, 06:57 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Improvised View Post
I've just finished spraying texture my walls (4 rooms: bathroom, hallway, living room, and kitchen). This is a remodel and I'm going over multiple surfaces (old recycled paper drywall, new drywall, topping compound, oil based paint, you name it). I did originally prime the walls with a water based epoxy primer (Vista Prime-ZALL) as I was told this would cover everything and is a "new water based equivalent to Kilz". Well, it seems to have done the trick in terms of giving the texture something to stick to and allowing it to dry evenly, but it's not blocking some of the old brown paper drywall on the ceiling. Needless to say, I've learned the hard way that I obviously need to use an oil based primer.

So my questions are:
1) Should I just stick with the epoxy primer on the walls since it seems to be blocking the stains there, or could this be a problem later with stains just coming out. Or might it also be a problem in wet areas like the bathroom/kitchen (where oil based paint was also previously used)?
2) What oil based primer should I use on the ceiling (and possibly walls)?

3) Will an oil based primer seal the texture or do I need to apply a sealer (or PVA) before/after the primer?

Thanks in advance!
I'm not familiar with your primer, but I am familiar with latex primers claiming to block water stains. I haven't found one, and stopped falling for it. Some stains will appear relatively soon, some may not reappear for months/years. If you have to prime all the texture prior to finish, it might be worth it to use oil, Zinsser Cover Stain, avail at HD, is a great go to. CS will seal stains and texture and the surfaces will then be ready for the finish of your choice. The base of the primer wouldn't matter in a wet area provided the proper finish is used, so if you have some latex left over you can use it there if you know there aren't any staining issues. I most times will seal any stains first thing, that way I don't have to guess where they are or oil prime an entire surface to cover my bases. I don't like to use oil unless I have to.
You can't put any water reduced product on the brown layer of sheetrock, with the possible exception of Gardz, as it will cause problems. Exposed brown patches must be primed with oil prior to spackle or priming with latex.
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Old 04-13-2011, 05:59 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by NCpaint1 View Post
You can use just about any oil primer that you like. I dont know why the drywall would be "bleeding" though. Were there water stains there perhaps? If the bleeding isnt a huge area, you could spot prime those areas with oil, or even use a small rattle can, then prime with latex.
NCpaint1, thanks for the comment. I should have mentioned, the brown board is exposed because I scraped the old popcorn off the ceiling. I also sanded some walls and exposed it that way. I was told that it was used about 30 years ago and is made from recycled paper; it bleeds through pretty badly (this might not be news to you).
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:04 PM   #5
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I'm not familiar with your primer, but I am familiar with latex primers claiming to block water stains. I haven't found one, and stopped falling for it. Some stains will appear relatively soon, some may not reappear for months/years. If you have to prime all the texture prior to finish, it might be worth it to use oil, Zinsser Cover Stain, avail at HD, is a great go to. CS will seal stains and texture and the surfaces will then be ready for the finish of your choice. The base of the primer wouldn't matter in a wet area provided the proper finish is used, so if you have some latex left over you can use it there if you know there aren't any staining issues. I most times will seal any stains first thing, that way I don't have to guess where they are or oil prime an entire surface to cover my bases. I don't like to use oil unless I have to.
You can't put any water reduced product on the brown layer of sheetrock, with the possible exception of Gardz, as it will cause problems. Exposed brown patches must be primed with oil prior to spackle or priming with latex.
Jsheridan, good call on stain blocking while the stains are exposed. I wish I would have thought of that before I put the fist coat on! Thanks for the tips. It's starting to sound like I should just play it safe and go oil anywhere I think stains might bleed through. I've also heard Zinsser BIN (shellac) will do it all--I might look into it.
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:39 PM   #6
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All good advice. I have seen wallpaper bleed before but it was old so who knows if it was something it absorbed over the years, if it was the wallpaper itself or the substrate.
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Old 04-13-2011, 10:45 PM   #7
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You're talking about plasterboard, early sheetrock. Nasty staining stuff from my experience. I've put oil primer over it with no problem. If you're not familiar working with BIN, stick with the Cover Stain. I think it's a little older than 30 years. For some reason, brown paper has always been part of wallboard from the earliest. I thought you were referring to the brown paper layer under the gray of modern stuff, which will cause blistering problems if not oil primed.
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Old 04-14-2011, 02:56 AM   #8
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If you're not familiar working with BIN, stick with the Cover Stain.
Thanks again, Jsheridan. I am kind of worried about BIN being overkill (and then killing me with the fumes). Would you recommend CS over Kilz Original?
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Old 04-14-2011, 07:45 PM   #9
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Thanks again, Jsheridan. I am kind of worried about BIN being overkill (and then killing me with the fumes). Would you recommend CS over Kilz Original?
In my opinion, yes. While both are stain sealing primers, cover stain has the added advantage of being a bonding primer as well, so it serves two functions as opposed to one. I think the smell is a little easier. They call it Kilz because it Kilz you.

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