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zhtway 05-23-2011 03:27 PM

Primer choice on New Drywall
 
Hi,

What primer is the best and affordable for the new drywall painting?
I am thinking of choosing alcohol based BIN Zinnser Stain Blocker for my garage project (1000sqft). I may need 3 gallons of it for 1 coat? Is it enough?

If I choose waterbased primer & sealer (which is cheaper than BIN), I think I might need 2 coats for priming and 5 gallons would be enough.

any expert opinion?

Thanks
zhtway

acerunner 05-23-2011 06:54 PM

this is what was used at my house recently.
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/paint/p...ler-63541.html

MikeKy55 05-23-2011 08:36 PM

I hope that is a good primer. I used it too.

Arey85 05-24-2011 11:55 AM

As a professional drywall contractor I will tell you that I always prime my houses with sherwin Williams master hide flat. I spray two coats on the ceiling and it's finished walls get one coat. It's more pricey than the home cheapo brands but it's well worth it. I also sand my walls after with 220

Arey85 05-24-2011 11:59 AM

My opinion on the glidden pva is that it's crap. I've used it twice in a pinch on a small addition and a basement. It's way too watery and not enough pigment in it. You will end up spending more money putting extra coats on. Plus is doesn't have the high hiding additive in it that sherwin Williams master hide flat does. With sw I can put one thick coat on purple MR board and it's ready for paint. You'll need at least 4 coats with that gladden crap. No professional painter would ever buy their paint from hd. It's either sherwin or Benjamin moore.

Gatorb8 06-08-2011 02:05 AM

The Glidden PVA primer isn't really designed to be a hiding primer only a sealing primer. The pigment in Glidden PVA is very low which is why it is a lower price. It is thinner to make it easier for spraying. I personally don't use it much but can see the value depending on the project.

superspeck 06-08-2011 02:25 PM

The PVA primer is indeed a sealing primer, and needs another 'hide' primer over it. I've found that it makes for MUCH smoother final surfaces though. I'm working with grade 4 surfaces in my house (no texturing) and eggshell or semi-gloss paint, and without using the PVA primers, the "New Low-VOC" stuff shows joint areas and anywhere there's compound through to the final coat. The way the very knowledgeable paint store employee explained it -- I go to a paint shop that mostly serves pros and sells Glidden and Benjamin Moore paints -- the low VOC reformulations doesn't dry as quickly or evenly on new drywall when rolled on, so you should use a PVA primer first, because the PVA primer will flash dry and provide a surface with even adhesion and drying properties for when you apply your primer and finish coats.

I've just painted an entire 600 sq ft living room with 16' vaulted ceilings ... 1 coat PVA primer, 1 coat benny moore fresh start, 1 coat benny moore Aquavelvet eggshell. Looks MUCH better than the kitchen that I'd done the "traditional" way, which was to just roll on a primer and roll on a finish coat.

Gatorb8 07-04-2012 03:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by superspeck
The PVA primer is indeed a sealing primer, and needs another 'hide' primer over it. I've found that it makes for MUCH smoother final surfaces though. I'm working with grade 4 surfaces in my house (no texturing) and eggshell or semi-gloss paint, and without using the PVA primers, the "New Low-VOC" stuff shows joint areas and anywhere there's compound through to the final coat. The way the very knowledgeable paint store employee explained it -- I go to a paint shop that mostly serves pros and sells Glidden and Benjamin Moore paints -- the low VOC reformulations doesn't dry as quickly or evenly on new drywall when rolled on, so you should use a PVA primer first, because the PVA primer will flash dry and provide a surface with even adhesion and drying properties for when you apply your primer and finish coats.

I've just painted an entire 600 sq ft living room with 16' vaulted ceilings ... 1 coat PVA primer, 1 coat benny moore fresh start, 1 coat benny moore Aquavelvet eggshell. Looks MUCH better than the kitchen that I'd done the "traditional" way, which was to just roll on a primer and roll on a finish coat.

This was good advice and accurate.

chrisn 07-04-2012 04:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gatorb8 (Post 957467)
This was good advice and accurate.

:laughing:


2 coats different primer and one finish coat is GOOD advise and ACCURATE??????????????:eek::eek::eek::eek::no::no: :no::no:


I think not

housepaintingny 07-04-2012 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arey85 (Post 653936)
As a professional drywall contractor I will tell you that I always prime my houses with sherwin Williams master hide flat. I spray two coats on the ceiling and it's finished walls get one coat. It's more pricey than the home cheapo brands but it's well worth it. I also sand my walls after with 220

Yes, Master hide is actually pretty good stuff. Spray one coat on walls, backroll, spray 2 coats on ceilings, backroll and then roll and brush walls using 18s.

Matthewt1970 07-04-2012 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arey85 (Post 653940)
My opinion on the glidden pva is that it's crap. I've used it twice in a pinch on a small addition and a basement. It's way too watery and not enough pigment in it. You will end up spending more money putting extra coats on. Plus is doesn't have the high hiding additive in it that sherwin Williams master hide flat does. With sw I can put one thick coat on purple MR board and it's ready for paint. You'll need at least 4 coats with that gladden crap. No professional painter would ever buy their paint from hd. It's either sherwin or Benjamin moore.

And there you have it.

chrisn 07-04-2012 05:34 PM

[quote=Arey85;653940]My opinion on the glidden pva is that it's crap. I've used it twice in a pinch on a small addition and a basement. It's way too watery and not enough pigment in it. You will end up spending more money putting extra coats on. Plus is doesn't have the high hiding additive in it that sherwin Williams master hide flat does. With sw I can put one thick coat on purple MR board and it's ready for paint. You'll need at least 4 coats with that gladden crap. No professional painter would ever buy their paint from hd. It's either sherwin or Benjamin moore.[/quote]


Well, there are some more, but that is the general consensus


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