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Old 03-25-2009, 02:40 AM   #1
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Primer brush strokes


help please
I'm in the process of painting my living room, dining room and a hall way. I did a lot of patching so I just primed those areas. While I was spot priming(I did two coats of primer using Kilz2 waterbased multi-purpose ) I noticed the brush strokes but thought they would go away while it dried. Obviously, they didn't. So I searched online and found out I needed to use a roller over the areas. Too late now. But luckily I haven't started with the paint coat.

My questions are: will it look bad if I apply paint(with a roller of course) over it? (i'm planning on using a light cream/ off white color)
if 1st question isn't an option is than: how do I fix the problem? I'm guessing sanding(what grit?) then reprime with a roller? I'm guessing there will a lot of dust so I'll need to wash the walls off after sanding then let them dry. Do I have to let the dust settle before I paint? and how long after I wash the walls off can I reprime?

I hope someone learns from my mistake.

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Last edited by newbpainter; 03-25-2009 at 02:59 AM.
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Old 03-25-2009, 04:19 AM   #2
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Primer brush strokes


So sad!

You will have to sand paper it and re-apply fresh a coat.

I know its hard work but you gotta do it.

Dana

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Old 03-25-2009, 10:48 AM   #3
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Primer brush strokes


No matter what you use to spot prime, work it smooth. True, a roller won't leave brush marks, but if you leave a heavy line on the edge of your primed area, that will show through too.
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Old 03-25-2009, 02:16 PM   #4
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Primer brush strokes


sanding - thats what I was dreading. Well I started sanding this morning and the mesh on the poll stick isn't working. So I tried 100 by hand. No good either. So I brought out my electric sander with 100 grit, still not working very good. small dry clunks of primer are getting stuck in the stand paper. (the primer is supposed to dry in an hour and it's been at least 12 hours since i primed) Oh my, it's gonna be a loooooonnnngggg day.
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Old 03-25-2009, 04:23 PM   #5
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It will gum up your paper untill it is completely cured, and even then might still do it. Curing time varies for diffrent paint. Primer is quicker but still may take a week or two untill it is really ready to be sanded. Also keep in mind your brush strokes will be more prominent / visable on fresh joint compound.

What will help is if you can hit those primes area's again with a roller. What I would do in this spot, and this takes a little care, hit those primed areas with a roller set up with the finish paint. Cover the roller setup to keep anything from drying and wait an hour or so. Then go back in and paint the entire room normally, starting with the cutting in to allow the rolled patches to dry even further. You will now have atleast 2 coats of roll texture over the patched areas and that should help blend them in.
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Old 03-25-2009, 06:28 PM   #6
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Primer brush strokes


I went through 2 sand sponges, 2 screens and 2 sheets of sand paper.(all of them clogged) And I only sanded 2 walls. I gave up.

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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
It will gum up your paper untill it is completely cured, and even then might still do it. Curing time varies for diffrent paint. Primer is quicker but still may take a week or two untill it is really ready to be sanded. Also keep in mind your brush strokes will be more prominent / visable on fresh joint compound.

What will help is if you can hit those primes area's again with a roller. What I would do in this spot, and this takes a little care, hit those primed areas with a roller set up with the finish paint. Cover the roller setup to keep anything from drying and wait an hour or so. Then go back in and paint the entire room normally, starting with the cutting in to allow the rolled patches to dry even further. You will now have atleast 2 coats of roll texture over the patched areas and that should help blend them in.


Excellent advice Matthew. I'm gonna reprime using a roller and then do as you said. Thankyou.

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Last edited by newbpainter; 03-25-2009 at 06:34 PM.
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