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Old 03-11-2010, 10:01 AM   #1
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To Prime or not


I am repainting my daughter's room after 11 years. She wants to keep two walls the same existing color (purple) and change the color on the other two to lime green. (yeah, I know)

The walls that will remain the same color I was going to repaint anyway just to have fresh paint throughout the room.

Just to let you know the paint held up beautifully with no fading, peeling or cracking. It actually looks fine. I used BM Regal.

My question is if I clean these two remaining walls and just put a coat of the same paint over them, will I get good results? If all the walls were going to be the same color I wouldn't be asking. I would just prime everything and paint like normal.

I am thinking about the cost and coverage, because one color is a shade of purple the other will be lime green.

Also, how is the top quality Glidden.

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Old 03-11-2010, 11:00 AM   #2
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Just to let you know the paint held up beautifully with no fading, peeling or cracking. It actually looks fine. I used BM Regal. Also, how is the top quality Glidden.
You answered your own question. BM is real paint and Glidden is box store crap. Menard's sells it I think or maybe HD. I don't shop in such places so I really do not know. If a Benjamin Moore product stuck to the wall for 11 years and you were happy and did not have to repaint in all that time? With a kid attacking it at times? Do you really mean to be asking us that buy paint daily whether you should use Glidden?

If you clean and prep the walls to get the same color? Spot prime any patches and then put two new coats over everything. Have a picture taken of you and your kid in a purple and lime green room. Plan on using it for bribery purposes later in life.

As for the lime green change? You will need two top coats with at least a 1/2" nap roller cover anyhow. Worth a shot to try the dramatic color change without a primer I guess. If it were my place or client project with such a color change? I would lay down a primer, tinted to 50-60 percent of the new paint color formula first. I would put two coats of nice paint store finish over it.

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Old 03-11-2010, 11:12 AM   #3
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Assuming all the coatings involved are water emulsified, I would not be concerned with priming. I rarely if ever prime simply because of a color change. One coat on the purple may be sufficient, but if you are doing any mudding, I would plan on two to be safe.

The key to a two color scheme is to do one color one day overlapping the corners, let it dry at least over night, tape the corners (really burnish the edge of the tape), and then paint the second color. That gives the sharpest, cleanest lines.
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Old 03-11-2010, 11:21 AM   #4
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The key to a two color scheme is to do one color one day overlapping the corners, let it dry at least over night, tape the corners (really burnish the edge of the tape), and then paint the second color. That gives the sharpest, cleanest lines.
Or if you are a real painter, do not use tape to start except where absolutely necessary. Buy a decent angled sash brush instead of painter's tape and learn to use it.
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Old 03-11-2010, 11:45 AM   #5
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I might not have expressed my question properly.
I had every intention of priming the new colored walls then two coats of paint. It was the walls that I was going to keep the same color I was asking about priming.

Thanks.
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Old 03-11-2010, 11:47 AM   #6
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Clean them. Patch the holes. Prime any patches. Two coats of finish. You will be fine. Unless it is semi-gloss or something. Then you should sand or degloss the surface.
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Old 03-11-2010, 01:00 PM   #7
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There's a school of thought that says you prime bare materials, like drywall, joint compound, wood etc, but you paint existing painted surfaces, like already-painted walls.

I go along with that. And remember priming has most to do with adhesion - not colour...
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Old 03-11-2010, 09:37 PM   #8
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Since you were so happy with the Ben Moore why not look into Aura - especially for those walls with the color change. Aura is self priming and it's a one hour recoat - should make quick work out of those walls. Yes, I know it's 20 bucks more a gallon - but what does a gallon of primer cost, plus the labor to apply...
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Old 03-12-2010, 11:55 AM   #9
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I did and I am contemplating it. The employee in Aboff's paint store told me Aura is excellent, but forget how you know how to paint now, because the application is totally different. It dries very fast and comes with instructions.
He said you need to resist the urge to try and smooth things out and just leave it till it dries.
Also he said you might want to cut the whole room first and then roll, which goes against my "always keep a wet edge" rule.
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Old 03-12-2010, 12:21 PM   #10
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Aura is self priming and it's a one hour recoat - should make quick work out of those walls. Yes, I know it's 20 bucks more a gallon - but what does a gallon of primer cost, plus the labor to apply...
No paint is self-priming and I wish those promoting this would stop the nonsense. Pains me that SW and Ben Moore have stepped on the band wagon. Paint and primer are two different animals with their own chemistry and purposes.
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Old 03-12-2010, 12:33 PM   #11
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While I agree that sometimes a true primer is necessary, the "self-priming" aspect of aura works well with color changes, which is what the OP was concerned about. I have used Aura as well over new sheetrock without priming, and experienced excellent results. Obviously for certain instances like covering stains, raw wood, going over oil or even a glossy paint, I would suggest a seperate primer. However, for simple color changes or in instances where a dark red would typically call for a tinted primer, the aura does work well in eliminating a step.
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Old 03-12-2010, 01:02 PM   #12
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I am really going to have to reconsider my thinking on self-priming paints if BM and SW are into; I didn't know that. I had previously thought priming had a lot to do with inorganic fillers filling the microscopic holes in, say, drywall while doing a fiar job or covering tannin satin in bare wood, but I am starting to think there's something else to "self-priming" than wwhat I had thought.

Just read a patent and a lot of mention was made of new low molecular weight polymers that do the traditional job of the old primers, that would make them "self-priming" - although it depends on your definition of "priming" in the first place...Hmmm

Food for thought. It may depend on the colour though and partially on the substrate.
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Old 03-12-2010, 01:13 PM   #13
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I am sorry but I think it is 99 percent marketing hype and that unwitting consumers will be very disappointed. Paint companies have been offering one coat coverage for ages and I guess if you do not care what the finished job looks like....

I am not about to tell my clients I am going to use self-priming products just yet or that they are for a moment real. Of course I am not out to gouge them and will jump at such things when proven, in a heartbeat.

I guess some of the newer nano tech polymers offer some hope but neither SW and Ben Moore offer such things yet. And Behr primer/paint in one is absolute crap and should not be used in any space to be inhabited by humans, pets, insect or mammal pests, or even single cell organisms!
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Old 03-14-2010, 03:27 AM   #14
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If your painting the same color as what is existing there's no need to prime. If you do any repairs on those walls you'll have to "Spot prime" the repaired areas. If you have to spot prime, you can get your primer tinted to near the same color as you will be applying, that will make coverage blend much better. Any paint or big box store will tint it for free.
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I might not have expressed my question properly.
I had every intention of priming the new colored walls then two coats of paint. It was the walls that I was going to keep the same color I was asking about priming.

Thanks.
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Old 03-14-2010, 11:02 AM   #15
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How do you feel about BM's "ben" and how does it compare to Regal. The Regal is 100% acrylic and the ben is blended.
I painted most of my house in Regal and liked it a lot.

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