Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-04-2008, 07:26 PM   #1
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Primar Necessary?


I am painting a bar area, it is currently a 1960's orange. I am going to paint it BM Regal, Bayshore beige. Do you think I should give it a coat of BIN or would you just go ahead with the Regal?
Thanks
Jamie

jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 07:48 PM   #2
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Primar Necessary?


Though two coats Regal covers pretty well, I'm guessing the groovy color is a bit bold, and a bit old
It's never a bad idea to prime older paint as it's often very "thirsty", and can cause uneven application and sheen of the new

Even w/o seeing the color difference, I'd say a coat of primer would be a good idea
Though I would not recommend BIN by any means
BM's Fresh Start acrylic would be just great

Heads Up: It doesn't have to look like a new freshly painted white wall after priming, just one coat to seal it and tone down the orange

slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 07:53 PM   #3
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Primar Necessary?


Quote:
Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
Though two coats Regal covers pretty well, I'm guessing the groovy color is a bit bold, and a bit old
It's never a bad idea to prime older paint as it's often very "thirsty", and can cause uneven application and sheen of the new

Even w/o seeing the color difference, I'd say a coat of primer would be a good idea
Though I would not recommend BIN by any means
BM's Fresh Start acrylic would be just great

Heads Up: It doesn't have to look like a new freshly painted white wall after priming, just one coat to seal it and tone down the orange
Thanks. I'll give it a coat of primer. Just curious, why not use BIN?
jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 08:23 PM   #4
Tired, Cold, and Damp
 
slickshift's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 3,089
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Primar Necessary?


It's overkill for this project
It certainly is one of the best...arguably the best sealer out there
But it's also difficult to apply and quite the brain cell killer

Save it for sealing/priming the old dark brown (and maybe lacquered, shellacked or maybe poly'd who can tell) trim and doors, or the fire damage, furnace blow-back coated, or nicotine coated walls...or mouse/pet odor sealing




...or you may want it for that groovy '70s slick dark paneling in the other room

...unless, of course, you have the avocado appliances and the brown and orange giant-flower-patterned mega high pile super-shag carpet to go with the paneling and want to keep it
slickshift is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2008, 09:49 PM   #5
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Primar Necessary?


Quote:
Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
It's overkill for this project
It certainly is one of the best...arguably the best sealer out there
But it's also difficult to apply and quite the brain cell killer

Save it for sealing/priming the old dark brown (and maybe lacquered, shellacked or maybe poly'd who can tell) trim and doors, or the fire damage, furnace blow-back coated, or nicotine coated walls...or mouse/pet odor sealing




...or you may want it for that groovy '70s slick dark paneling in the other room

...unless, of course, you have the avocado appliances and the brown and orange giant-flower-patterned mega high pile super-shag carpet to go with the paneling and want to keep it
I agree, it is more difficult to apply than most other paints I have used. Kind of like spreading water. But I had a can of BIN and just wanted it done. It was one of those evil orange colors, (I wonder what people will say about that deep deep red we are all using now when they try to paint over it in 20 years) that BIN even had a really hard time covering in one coat. I am sure it will be fine with a top coat of regal. I am really glad I listened to you can put a coat of primar on it, or I would have ended up with 3 coats of regal or .... Thanks. :-)

No retro appliances. I do have the wood paneling thing, however, I am fortunate that it is all oak, and still looks fairly classy, it doesn't look nearly as retro as most of the old paneling I have see out there.

Orange shag carpet was there,, but went 2 years ago. LOL!

Thanks!!

Jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2008, 03:17 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 551
Rewards Points: 502
Default

Primar Necessary?


Just FYI, the vast majority of primers have lousy "hide." Most primers exist as a surface and/or stain sealer and adhesion enhancer; for the most part they have very little pigment, even compared to cheap paint. Unless a primer is specifically designed for hide, (they do exist), you would not expect them to cover up a deep existing coat at all. That is paint's job, and that is what quality paint is made for.

SirWired
sirwired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2008, 09:48 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,264
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Primar Necessary?


What's the tint formula of the paint you plan to put over the old orange paint? If it's "Bayshore Beige", I'm guessing it'll have a lot of inorganic pigments in it, and be fairly light as well. So, you should get pretty good hide right from the Bayshore Beige.

If it were me, I'd just clean the old paint with a green 3M Scotchbrite pad allow time to dry, and apply a coat of Bayshore Beige to a small area about 6 inches by 6 inches a 1 inch foam brush. Allow to dry, and then paint half that area (3 inches by 6 inches) with a second coat of Bayshore Beige. Allow to dry and paint half THAT area (3 inches by 3 inches) with a third coat of Bayshore Beige.

If you can see a difference in colour density between two coats and three, then I'd be inclined to use a tinted high hiding primer as your first coat.

If you can't see any difference between two coats and three, I'd just clean the old orange paint with either TSP (if it's an oil based paint) or a green Scotchbrite pad (if it's latex paint) and just start painting (without using a primer first).
Nestor_Kelebay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2008, 11:18 PM   #8
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,809
Rewards Points: 1,058
Default

Primar Necessary?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiedolan View Post
I am painting a bar area, it is currently a 1960's orange. I am going to paint it BM Regal, Bayshore beige. Do you think I should give it a coat of BIN or would you just go ahead with the Regal?
Thanks
Jamie
I would think 2 coats will cover it. Primer can't hurt, but may just be adding a 3rd coat (one coat of primer and 2 coats of paint verses just 2 coats of paint)
Matthewt1970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2008, 08:16 AM   #9
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Primar Necessary?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
What's the tint formula of the paint you plan to put over the old orange paint? If it's "Bayshore Beige", I'm guessing it'll have a lot of inorganic pigments in it, and be fairly light as well. So, you should get pretty good hide right from the Bayshore Beige.

If it were me, I'd just clean the old paint with a green 3M Scotchbrite pad allow time to dry, and apply a coat of Bayshore Beige to a small area about 6 inches by 6 inches a 1 inch foam brush. Allow to dry, and then paint half that area (3 inches by 6 inches) with a second coat of Bayshore Beige. Allow to dry and paint half THAT area (3 inches by 3 inches) with a third coat of Bayshore Beige.

If you can see a difference in colour density between two coats and three, then I'd be inclined to use a tinted high hiding primer as your first coat.

If you can't see any difference between two coats and three, I'd just clean the old orange paint with either TSP (if it's an oil based paint) or a green Scotchbrite pad (if it's latex paint) and just start painting (without using a primer first).
HI

I ended up giving it a light cleaning and applying a coat of BIN. Bin had fairly good hide and the surface was very very easy to paint with the Regal.

1 coat of regal on top of the BIN and it is done. I don't think it could get any better with a second coat. I was truely amazed at home nice and easy the regal went on.

It's kind of funny, BIN works so well, but is is really fairly difficult to get on correctly (have to be careful not toget roller marks and drips, but I have used it a few times now and have it down pretty well.) The BIN kind of reminds me of cheap home depot behr paint, I did my whole living room witn deep garnet (red) from behr this summer. What a BEAR, it was a lot of work, but I learned how to roll properly, because if I didn't the bear looked like crap right away. My red wall looks perfect and professional, and I greatly improved my rolling skills on that project, if I had not done that red first and learned how to roll pretty well, I would have really had trouble with the bin.

Thanks guys for the help. Turned out to work out very well with just the 2 coats, which I am very happy about due to a fair amount of cut in work in this little job.

Take care;
Jamie
jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2008, 10:57 AM   #10
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,809
Rewards Points: 1,058
Default

Primar Necessary?


Excellent. Ya the Regal is good stuff. Sherwin Williams has comperable stuff as well. The Behr paint? Before people ever say that Regal is over priced compared to Behr really needs to go get a can of that $10 - $12 Glidden stuff and see that is it right on par with the Behr and then see decide what is overpriced.
Matthewt1970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2008, 11:50 AM   #11
DIY'er
 
jamiedolan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Neenah, Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 2,032
Rewards Points: 1,000
Blog Entries: 2
Default

Primar Necessary?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
Excellent. Ya the Regal is good stuff. Sherwin Williams has comperable stuff as well. The Behr paint? Before people ever say that Regal is over priced compared to Behr really needs to go get a can of that $10 - $12 Glidden stuff and see that is it right on par with the Behr and then see decide what is overpriced.
The "cheap" paint (behr, glidden,etc.) just are not worth the struggle. I learned you can make them work if you want to take the time, but it isn't worth it.

It doesn't hurt that I keep finding these gallons of regal as mised tints for $5. I find them in the same color in pairs. not sure how that happens, but I paid $4.99 a gallon for these 2 matching gallons of bayshore beige.

I don't always get that lucky, sometimes I have to pay full price, but have gotten really lucky several times watching the mised tints.

Jamie

jamiedolan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.