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Old 07-05-2012, 02:15 PM   #1
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pressure treated wood.


I live in SC. Its near 100 here each day.How long before I can paint my new furniture?can I use latex paint on pressure treated wood?

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Old 07-05-2012, 05:54 PM   #2
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pressure treated wood.


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I live in SC. Its near 100 here each day.How long before I can paint my new furniture?can I use latex paint on pressure treated wood?

I've read that you should give it 6 months after it's built,that is a fence or deck.

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Old 07-05-2012, 06:05 PM   #3
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pressure treated wood.


I would use stain instead of paint.
I've seen way to much peeling paint on outside decks that people spend weeks trying to get off.
With stain it fade, just clean and reapply more stain every few years.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:43 PM   #4
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pressure treated wood.


Moved to painting forum.
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Old 07-05-2012, 07:44 PM   #5
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pressure treated wood.


It depends on what type of pressure treatment you have and how long it has been since the wood was treated. Some types of pressure treatment used in outdoor furniture can, supposedly, be primed/painted or stained immediately. Typical pressure treatment needs six months or more to absorb into the wood and for the solvents to evaporate before you can apply a finish.

Whether you use paint or stain is up to you. You need a primer if using paint and I would use an alkyd like Benjamin Moore Fresh Start. If using a solid color stain, I would go with something like Sherwin Williams Woodscapes acrylic (water based)---it requires no primer. If staining with a semi-transparent use something like Cabot's or Sikkens products.

If you prep and prime, and contrary to prior post, paint will last as long as stain. Whatever you use, plan on applying finish every 2-3 years. If you race and apply anything to pressure treatment that is not yet ready you are in for trouble.
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Old 07-06-2012, 04:54 AM   #6
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pressure treated wood.


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I would use stain instead of paint.
I've seen way to much peeling paint on outside decks that people spend weeks trying to get off.
With stain it fade, just clean and reapply more stain every few years.

There was no mention of decks
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Old 07-07-2012, 08:27 PM   #7
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pressure treated wood.


Read the paint/stain can label for all p.t. wood, furniture or decks, and fences. Go to the manufactures website, p.t. wood or coating, eg.; “New wood, once dry, should not be allowed to weather. Short-term (4 weeks) weathering prior to application of this product can decrease its service life.” From: http://cabotstain.com/products/produ...od-Primer.html

“New wood should be coated as soon as possible to prevent damage
from water absorption and UV. Wash with WEATHER PRO Wood
Cleaner & Brightener to remove slickness (mill glaze) or waxes often
found on new wood. New non-CCA pressure treated lumber should
be treated the same as other new wood even though it may be very
wet. Traditionally such surfaces would be allowed to dry completely
before coating. Because of the wetness, the first application of stain
on pressure treated wood may last only a few months but the option
is to risk severe cracking and splitting as the wood dries if left
unsealed.” From: http://rustoleum.com/cbgimages/docum...gFence_209.pdf


“New pressure-treated lumber requires a six-week drying period prior to application. Water-repellent treated lumber requires one year of weathering prior to application.” From: http://www.nam.sikkens.com/pdf/Cetol..._app_guide.pdf

Used a water-proof treatment: “Convenience
  • One Day Project - Applies to Both Damp or Dry Wood in just one coat.
  • Waterbased: Easy, Soap & Water Clean Up.
  • Low VOC: Low Odor.
  • New Pressure Treated Wood Application: No waiting while wood can be damaged.” From: http://www.thompsonswaterseal.com/pr....cfm?prod_id=2
Gary

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