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karlthev 05-15-2012 10:11 AM

Porch paint lifting
 
Well, I finally found out what was wrong with paint lifting from radiator covers, now, front porch floor problems!

I prepped my front porch floor last year by scraping, sanding smooth as much as possible and then applying Valspar floor paint. As background, the porch is part of a 110 year old home and is covered with a roof but open on the sides. The paint lifted in one month! I contacted the representative who indicated that Pennsylvania does not allow the sale of oil-based paints which were, according to him, the best for such use. This isn't the first time I have had problems with paint lifting prematurely.

Since I can't buy oil-base paint here, has anyone a suggestion on some other paint which WILL stick? Epoxy-based.....?


Karl

Mr. Paint 05-15-2012 11:32 AM

Karl, California has similar restrictions. The paint my company manufactures is a premium-quality 100% Acrylic. These paints work well if you remember a few things: These are SELF-PRIMING. Do not use a primer under them because primers are not meant to be walked on unless specifically made for such purpose.

Be sure the wood is sanded to open the grain and remove all the loose coating. If there are outer trim boards, caulk any open seams to prevent water entry.

Your first, or prime coat, must be thinned according to directions. This will be 10 to 20 percent. Two full-strength topcoats over your thinned prime coat should give you a good job.

Don't let your expectations exceed the product performance. Horizontal surfaces will fail quicker than vertical ones. Your porch can stay good-looking with regular maintenance.

ric knows paint 05-16-2012 07:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by karlthev (Post 921849)
Well, I finally found out what was wrong with paint lifting from radiator covers, now, front porch floor problems!

I prepped my front porch floor last year by scraping, sanding smooth as much as possible and then applying Valspar floor paint. As background, the porch is part of a 110 year old home and is covered with a roof but open on the sides. The paint lifted in one month! I contacted the representative who indicated that Pennsylvania does not allow the sale of oil-based paints which were, according to him, the best for such use. This isn't the first time I have had problems with paint lifting prematurely.

Since I can't buy oil-base paint here, has anyone a suggestion on some other paint which WILL stick? Epoxy-based.....?


Karl

Hiya Karl...

Everything Mr. Paint said is dead-on - including, and especially the part about realistic expectations of paint performance on horizontal surfaces. As is in all paint apps, proper and necessary surface prep is paramount...and a high quality acrylic system should work well in your situation.

But after saying that, I gotta challenge your paint rep in his response to you. Pennsylvania's VOC & OTC regs absolutely does NOT prohibit the sale of alkyd/oil products, and there are many companies that continue to manufacture alkyds for use in strict markets, for re-sale to the homeowner (without an OEM exemption)...Some companies have simply decided to no longer offer alkyds 'cause it's just not worth the reformulation shuffle they must go through each time our well meaning legislators decide to lower VOC allowances - but there are still several manufacturers that recognize the demand and advantage of alkyds in specific apps, and can (and do) bring these viable products to market within the allowable VOC regs (including Pennsylvania)...

Also, on exterior wood floors, the disadvantages would actually outweigh the advantages of using an epoxy rather than an alkyd or acrylic...Talk to your local Independent Paint dealer for his/her advice and recommendations...

user1007 05-16-2012 08:23 AM

Ben Moore makes excellent porch and floor paint. Oil based is urethane reinforced and acrylic is epoxy reinforced. I would use either with confidence. I would never use a box store floor paint.

As mentioned they are self-priming. I would do two coats.

karlthev 05-16-2012 10:07 AM

As a matter fo fact a buddy of mine recommended Benjamin Moore the other day. I'm going o give it a try. Thanks to all!


Karl

Will22 05-16-2012 01:58 PM

Most acrylic floor paints are 100% acrylic (they are generally not epoxy reinforced), and they do not require a primer (as noted, still a two-coat system) . If the porch is wood, then painting becomes a regular maintenance issue: stain may be longer lasting option.

The OTC VOC regulations prohibit the sale of architectural alkyd paints (exceptions are quart sizes, and some industrial alkyd products which are classified as rust inhibitive). The OTC is governed by the EPA.

Incidentally, the porch and floor paints from Glidden sold in Home Depot AND in the Glidden Professional stores are the same- there are not two different grades.

user1007 05-16-2012 03:19 PM

I guess Benjamin Moore is calling it Floor and Patio paint now. Same difference. It is an epoxy modified acrylic latex. Here are the specs. As I said, they also make a urethane reinforced alkyd. Like I say, I would have no qualms using either. The latex is easier to clean up if that is an issue for you and since you put a latex product down already I guess I would keep going that direction.

http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-ca/f...2&advs=0&tab=3


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