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Old 10-10-2007, 07:48 AM   #1
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


I have a somewhat weathered door with black mildew growing under or through the surface. I would like to prime with Ben Moore oil base, then top coat with Ben Moore forest green. I'd like the door high gloss, the kind that only oil base can provide. So, I am considering using Impervo Alkyd for the top coat. The door does not get very much sun. Less than a hour a day.

Needless to say, the paint dealer has recommended against this because the oil will fade. I'm not convinced thats an issue.

So if you have some experience with this sort of thing perhaps you can put this in perspective for me.

I'd like to believe 5 years could be expected before any significant fading. Am I way off base here?

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Old 10-10-2007, 08:08 AM   #2
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


go for it...let us know in five years. Only you know how even and how much sun it gets. Most doors get more sun on the bottom.

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Old 10-10-2007, 09:42 AM   #3
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


Black mold is about the worst type of fungus you will come across!
This needs to be removed entirely before you plan on any type of repairs or painting. Otherwise, you chance exposing yourself to any number of unhealthy situations that could lead up to chronic problems.
It happens to be the number one issue in construction these days due to all of the health related issues that it are associated with it; (ie) Respiritory symtoms like Asthma, mood swings, depression, nerve disorders Brochitus, incessant coughing, headaches etc...
This is usually found in the dark damp places where the sun doesn't shine.
Due to our ever increasing need to insulate and weather proof our homes, we are experiencing an increasing amount of molds and air borne spores, that are attributed to the lack of air flow/circulation. Particlarly in new construction.
a basic solution to removing this is to spray the area with a solution of 1 part bleach to 4-5 parts cool water. Then let it dry without rinsing. If any the materials that you're working with are less than firm or becomming softer from prolonged exposure to this or other molds, remove/replace them. Why put you and or other's at risk? Sealing this up will not kill it off. In fact, molds will work their way through and perhaps feed off the organic ingredients of the paints.
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Old 10-10-2007, 12:13 PM   #4
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


Thank you. That is certainly information that everyone should be made aware of. Most certainly I will properly prepare the door surface before painting.

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Old 10-10-2007, 12:15 PM   #5
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


RemodelMan... I'm getting the impression from the original poster that he is talking about the outside surface of an exterior door. How dangerous the mildew is or isn't doesn't matter if it stays outside the house.

DocFletcher... Given the limited sun exposure, I don't see it fading particularly much. I would think that fading would depend more on the colorants, not the base type.

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Old 10-10-2007, 12:28 PM   #6
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Well, yes and no from what I understand. Oil base seems to be known for fading. I want to use oil base for hardness and the high gloss finish you just can't get from latex.
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Old 10-10-2007, 08:02 PM   #7
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Polyurethane Coated Exterior Door


I wouldn't say oil paint is 'known" for fading
Oil paint wears by fading, rather than peeling
It's a subtle difference yes, but here in the NE USA, oil lasts much longer than latex

I would recommend oil in your case

-From the Land Of Rust And Mildew in the Atlantic Ocean
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Old 10-10-2007, 08:26 PM   #8
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Oilbase was once the king of paint prep. It still has merit indoors over funky stains, questionable surfaces that bleed through and for most bathroom situations that are vented.
If you choose to use an oilbase pimer and layer it with a latex, be prepared for paint seperation aka "alligatoring". This will occur most notably, in the Southern side of the home. This is because the oilbase does not have the flexibility that the latex has. Latex will move with substrate as the oil will remain inflexible until it cracks. The better quality latex paints will now consistently outperform the oilbase paints even in the color retention catagory. This was not necessarily true 15 years ago. The "California Paint" brand, for example, is a top of the line exterior paint rated #1 in consumer reports.
Sure, you can expect to pay more up front for the better paints, but consider what your time. $ and energy are worth when you realize that the dollars you saved up front are worth when a couple of years later you get to repeat the whole process!

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