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Old 11-21-2011, 10:44 PM   #1
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Hi everyone. I have been googling for info on the best way to prime and paint my daughter's bedoom "French Provencial" furniture (that originally came from the factory with a painted finish), but can't seem to find the info I need. I've been reading some of the threads on this site and am impressed with all the knowledge and experience you all are willing to share to help others. So I hope you can give me some good advice.
I even called several of the big paint manuf.'s for advice. SW recommended their adhesive primer, which is desgined to cover over glossy surfaces, since I was going over the original, factory- applied oil painted finish. Even though I washed everything with tsp and did a light scuff sand, they said that since you might miss a small spot or two, it was best to use this primer since I was planning on painting with a latex paint. (I get migraines from oil-based paint smells.)
So today I started using the adhesive primer in the garage, where the temp was about 60 degress. Even with the cool temperatures and high humidity (it was drizzling outside even), the primer was setting up quickly and got very "gunky", showing roller brush marks everywhere. The primer did remind me a bit of elmer's glue in consistency. This bedroom set has sots of details that create drips, too-- I was constantly battling them! I haven't finished priming everything. Should I switch to a different type of primer, or will I have this problem with any primer? Will it be impossible to get a nice finish without using a sprayer? (I didn't want to have to rent one, and was afraid that I'd have trouble with it anyway.) There is a lot of furniture to paint, and I am feeling overwhelmed! By the way, the reason I am repainting it is that so much of it has chipped off, mainly around the top edges and on the "feet", and the paint has yellowed.
Thanks for any advice you can give.

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Old 11-21-2011, 10:52 PM   #2
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Unfortunately much of what I think you are going through is because you haven't much experience handling this kind of paint.
What is the primer they are having you use?
I often add a small splash of water to make it lay out better-
If you can't brush it- spraying is even harder. Don't even consider it.
Right brush - right consistency- right technique.

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Old 11-22-2011, 03:22 AM   #3
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


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Originally Posted by Fun2Learn View Post
Hi everyone. I have been googling for info on the best way to prime and paint my daughter's bedoom "French Provencial" furniture (that originally came from the factory with a painted finish), but can't seem to find the info I need. I've been reading some of the threads on this site and am impressed with all the knowledge and experience you all are willing to share to help others. So I hope you can give me some good advice.
I even called several of the big paint manuf.'s for advice. SW recommended their adhesive primer, which is desgined to cover over glossy surfaces, since I was going over the original, factory- applied oil painted finish. Even though I washed everything with tsp and did a light scuff sand, they said that since you might miss a small spot or two, it was best to use this primer since I was planning on painting with a latex paint. (I get migraines from oil-based paint smells.)
So today I started using the adhesive primer in the garage, where the temp was about 60 degress. Even with the cool temperatures and high humidity (it was drizzling outside even), the primer was setting up quickly and got very "gunky", showing roller brush marks everywhere. The primer did remind me a bit of elmer's glue in consistency. This bedroom set has sots of details that create drips, too-- I was constantly battling them! I haven't finished priming everything. Should I switch to a different type of primer, or will I have this problem with any primer? Will it be impossible to get a nice finish without using a sprayer? (I didn't want to have to rent one, and was afraid that I'd have trouble with it anyway.) There is a lot of furniture to paint, and I am feeling overwhelmed! By the way, the reason I am repainting it is that so much of it has chipped off, mainly around the top edges and on the "feet", and the paint has yellowed.
Thanks for any advice you can give.
roller brush marks?
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:38 AM   #4
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Thanks, Brush Jockey. I will try adding some water. I'd appreciate any other pointers on the right "technique" for painting furniture! What do you think of "floetrol" open-time extender? Is that only for paint, not primer? Thanks.

Sorry for the typos in my original post: I meant to say "roller AND brush marks"! I also noticed another typo where I wrote "sots of details" and meant to say "lots of details". These details include 18 spindles (ugh!) on the sides of the bookcase/hutch that goes on top of one of the dressers! This furniture set also has lots of curvey edges and "s" curves, and a thin, recessed curvey, decorative line chiseled into every piece and leg! So I was constantly battling drips. It is older, solidly made furniture though so I think it is worth repainting.

Question 1. Any suggestions on how to paint spindles and other "drip-prone" details on furniture?

The primer is Sherwin Williams "Adhesion Primer". The specs say it is a high quality, waterborne, acrylic primer. It is meant for glossy surfaces, including pvc pipes. Was this "overkill" on furniture?

Question 2: Would you recommend another primer for this situation?

Question 3: Any recommendations for a good Latex paint that might be more "forgiving" and maybe level-out the rough spots of the primer (or at least not create new ones if I do sand out the primer?)

The roller used was a 4" thin-diameter roller (meant for tight spaces and cabinets) with a 1/4" nap and labeled "best" quality.

Question 4: Would a high-density foam foller be better for smoothness?

I did use a "best" quality 2 1/2" chiseled edge Purdy brush with soft nylon bristles that were supposed to give the smoothest finish, according to the label.

Question 4: Is it ok to sand the primed surfaces to smooth it out some, or will that ruin the primer's ability to hold onto the top coat of paint?

Any other suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks so much, in advance, for all your help.
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Old 11-22-2011, 06:36 PM   #5
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fun2Learn View Post
Thanks, Brush Jockey. I will try adding some water. I'd appreciate any other pointers on the right "technique" for painting furniture! What do you think of "floetrol" open-time extender? Is that only for paint, not primer? Thanks.

Sorry for the typos in my original post: I meant to say "roller AND brush marks"! I also noticed another typo where I wrote "sots of details" and meant to say "lots of details". These details include 18 spindles (ugh!) on the sides of the bookcase/hutch that goes on top of one of the dressers! This furniture set also has lots of curvey edges and "s" curves, and a thin, recessed curvey, decorative line chiseled into every piece and leg! So I was constantly battling drips. It is older, solidly made furniture though so I think it is worth repainting.

Question 1. Any suggestions on how to paint spindles and other "drip-prone" details on furniture?
You have to be mindful as you're brushing where your edges are that will catch, brush with them and not against them. Some areas might do better if you stipple them. Part of doing this type of work successfully is where the experience comes in with knowing how much paint to carry and brush manipulation. It's hard to explain.


The primer is Sherwin Williams "Adhesion Primer". The specs say it is a high quality, waterborne, acrylic primer. It is meant for glossy surfaces, including pvc pipes. Was this "overkill" on furniture?

Question 2: Would you recommend another primer for this situation?
I would recommend you switch to Zinsser 123 primer, it will bond and it's not waterborne, so easier to work with. Get it at HD.

Question 3: Any recommendations for a good Latex paint that might be more "forgiving" and maybe level-out the rough spots of the primer (or at least not create new ones if I do sand out the primer?)
I would recommend SW Superpaint. I don't use it often but the last time I did I found it forgiving and easy to use.

The roller used was a 4" thin-diameter roller (meant for tight spaces and cabinets) with a 1/4" nap and labeled "best" quality.
That should be fine. You might be overloading the roller. When you reload the roller, you just go to the very edge of the paint in the tray, lap at the very edge. Hit the edge, pull back, hit the edge, pull back, a couple times to cover the roller uniformly. Never go too far into the paint.

Question 4: Would a high-density foam foller be better for smoothness?

IMO, no.

I did use a "best" quality 2 1/2" chiseled edge Purdy brush with soft nylon bristles that were supposed to give the smoothest finish, according to the label.
For detail work, 2.5 is way large. For cutting in areas that will be rolled, on furniture, you should only need 1.5 angle sash brush. You're probably applying too much paint with a 2.5. I don't even use a 2.5 to paint doors.

Question 4: Is it ok to sand the primed surfaces to smooth it out some, or will that ruin the primer's ability to hold onto the top coat of paint?
Yes, primer should be sanded prior to applying finish. Lightly with a fine paper, like 220. You should also fine sand between coats of finish also. Be sure to dust off after you sand.

Any other suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks so much, in advance, for all your help.
I hope this helps. Brush handling is hard to explain and lends more to seeing. Good luck.
Joe
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:12 PM   #6
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Thank you SO much, jsheridan!! I really appreciate the time you took to help me out. It sounds like good advice. I will buy a smaller brush and try going WITH the turnings on those spindles and curves, and maybe stippling them, as you suggest! I will also try what you suggest with the roller--not loading so much on.
I am afraid to try an oil based primer, due to the migraines they cause me, but I think I even have an old can of Zinser around here. Maybe I'll try and see how bad the smell is and if it effects me.
Again--thanks so much, and God Bless!!!!!
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:48 PM   #7
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


JSheridan-- I just googled Zinsser and apparently their 1-2-3 primer is waterborne! Did you mean a different product from Zinsser? They also have 123 plus, of which they say,( from the website)"Bulls Eye 1-2-3 PLUS Advanced Technology Primer is a revolution in water-base technology. The perfect primer for all interior and exterior painting projects, Bulls Eye 1-2-3 PLUS combines the performance characteristics of an oil-base primer dependable stain blocking, exceptional flow and leveling and deep penetration to seal the surface with all the benefits of a water-base primer. It is a water-base primer that truly blocks water stains." Is this the primer you were referring to, or the regular 1-2-3? Thanks!
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:27 PM   #8
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


I'm not sure why JS said it was not Waterborne- it is.
But it is an excellent primer and i would use it where you are. But brush technique would be the same with any product-
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:30 PM   #9
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


I did not know that. (Who made that line famous? ltd, where are you? ) I've been working with the 123 quite a bit lately and didn't seem to feel any of the characteristics of a waterborne. Maybe I'm just that used to working with waterbornes anymore that I don't even realize it. Sorry for the confusion. Anyway, it's not like elmer's glue, that's for sure. Buy a quart and try it, can't hurt.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:02 PM   #10
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Mr. Sheridan-- I clicked on the links under your signature and enjoyed reading and learning more tips about painting. Thanks for all the info you provide us diy's. However, I was wondering if by any chance you have any videos on You Tube or whatever actually demonstrating your techniques and tips? That would be awesome for us "visual learners"!

By the way--the owner of the Sherwin Williams store talked me into the latex Pro Classic in semi-gloss for the paint for the furniture, with floetrol added to help extend the open time. I searched this forum for "Pro classic", and read quite a few threads (I'm up too late, again!) and found that a lot of you pros say it has a learning curve. Anyone care to elaborate? (I think I read a thread or two where someone mentioned, for cabinets. rolling it on first, then finishing by tipping off with a brush. Would that be recommended on something with more surfaces and details like my bedroom set?

Also, if I add floetrol to the SW adhesion primer (SW says it is ok to do so), do you think it would be as easy to work with as the Zinsseer 123? It sounds like the Zinsser is sort of an adhesion primer as well, from some of those other threads I read on this forum. Although I did scuff sand, I probably missed a spot or two somewhere, and it is old oil paint, so I want to make sure my primer sticks to it! There is quite a bit of furniture, and it has lots of curves, reveals, turned spindles, etc., so I'm sure that I can't get every nook and cranny sanded completely.(I have 2 dressers, a mirror, 2 nightstands, a bookcase hutch, a chair, bench, and a desk to paint--which is why I am repainting it--I could never afford to buy that much new furniture!)
Thanks again, and good night everyone!
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Old 11-23-2011, 08:24 PM   #11
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Hey fun2learn, please, Mr. Sheridan is my dad, lol. Thanks for your kind words, and I'm glad you found the articles helpful. Unfortunately, I don't have any videos online, yet.
Adding floetrol will increase the open time and make things a bit easier. My brain isn't really in gear right now for explaining much else, so I'll just say Happy Thanksgiving, and to all a good night.
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Old 02-12-2012, 10:59 PM   #12
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Primer is a type of paint that is used to create a more adhesive surface to a material before it is painted with final coats of paint. In order to do so, primers are designed to bind with the surface of the material by being far more porous and tacky than other types of paint. Some types of primer like aluminum primer bond with a surface through a chemical reaction that occurs when the primer is exposed to certain materials. Certain surfaces that are particularly porous like wood and concrete require a coat of primer to create a smoother and more even surface before they are painted. Other surfaces are primed to protect the material and the paint from water and mold.


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cheap sofa beds
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Old 02-13-2012, 06:54 AM   #13
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Please help! I'm repainting bedroom furniture and primer is "gunking"!


Thanks, Maureen. This was an old thread, but I had email notification on, so I saw that you had a response. Thanks for the info. I did manage to finish my furniture painting project-thanks to advice and tips from the pros here- and it looks pretty good, if I do say so myself.

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