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-   -   Please help (again):Why is my SW Pro Classic paint sagging on the second coat? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/please-help-again-why-my-sw-pro-classic-paint-sagging-second-coat-125615/)

Fun2Learn 12-04-2011 08:44 PM

Please help (again):Why is my SW Pro Classic paint sagging on the second coat?
 
Hi. I am trying to finish up painting my daughter's "French Provencial" bedroom furniture and I am having trouble with the second coat sagging very badly. I am using SW's self-leveling paint, Pro Classic, in semi-gloss, with added floetrol for more "open time", (over a coat of SW's Adhesive primer, which went over the original factory-finished oil paint).

The first coat of Pro-Classic paint went on pretty well--it did drip a bit, but my furniture has lots of details, curves, reveals, spindles, etc. that are a bit prone to that, I guess. Despite my overworking the paint trying to get rid of drips, etc., the first coat did level out amazingly well, considering, and had a gorgeous smooth look to it! I was so happy. I did have to sand lots of drips and a few other "messed up areas" after it dried, but it wasn't too difficult to do. However, when I started to paint the second coat, it really started sagging, esp. on large vertical surfaces, like the sides of the dressers and desk. I was using the thinnest nap (3/16") skinny roller, to apply it, and then I lightly tipped it off with a brush (to get rid of the orange-peel texture) It looked great--at first---but a few minutes later it was sagging terribly. It was tacking up too quickly to fix while wet.

I called the company, and the customer service rep. asked if it was too cold, but those pieces I was painting were in the house temp was about 70-72 degress or so. She asked if I had used a tack cloth (I did on the areas that I had sanded to remove drips--but very lightly). She thought that perhaps the wax on the tack cloth was creating problems. She also thought it might possibly be the floetrol.

So I ran out and bought another gallon of the expensive pro-classic and didn't add the floetrol. I sanded all the "saggy" bumps (lots of work!) and did not use a tack cloth this time (just wiped off with a damp rag and let dry). The same thing happened again with the paint sagging on the sides of the dressers--though perhaps not quite as bad as with the floetrol--it is hard to tell. I am about to give up. The only thing I can think of is to sand the "saggy sides" down again, and turn the dressers on their sides so that the sides are horizontal (can only do one side at a time that way, however!)

Any other suggestions or thoughts? This paint does have a beautiful look to it when dry--if you can get it on smoothly! The guy at the SW paint store thought that I shouldn't switch paints as Pro-classic is very hard, and most other paints, even their Super Paint are "softer".

I still haven't given the smaller pieces that are still sitting in the garage the second coat at all (the drawers, chair, night stands, hutch shelf-top)partly because I'm waiting for it to warm up again--and partly because I'm afraid to try now! It is supposed to be a high of 62 tomorrow so I think it may be my last chance to be able to paint in the garage before spring. I could bring it inside--but that is where I was having all the sagging problems anyway!

( By the way: I posted here before Thanksgiving about problems I was having with SW's Adhesive Primer "gunking". Just as an update to that, the primer did seem to eventually "magically" level out some on its own, especially on the smaller pieces I had primed and left sitting in the garage, where the high humidity and cool temps. probably helped some) I was then able to sand out the remaining drips and "gunky" areas without much problem.)

Thanks in advance for any advice or suggestions you can give to help.

Fun2Learn 12-04-2011 08:51 PM

By the way
 
I forgot to mention something important: I did wait two days between the first and second coat (and about 4 or 5 days after I primed to start the first coat!)
Thanks

Brushjockey 12-04-2011 11:08 PM

The new waterbornes do have a tendency to do that - Some of it is corrected by applying less/ spreading more- some by slightly thinning the material . it is a feel thing. Hard to show over the internet.
But it does have a learning curve.

chrisn 12-05-2011 04:39 AM

[quote=Brushjockey;786257]The new waterbornes do have a tendency to do that - Some of it is corrected by applying less/ spreading more- some by slightly thinning the material . it is a feel thing. Hard to show over the internet.
But it does have a learning curve.[/quote]

That is being very kind, but that is just the way it is. It is hard for a pro to get used to let alone a DIY.It takes lots of practice.
I am sure JS will come along and explain so it is easier to understand

jsheridan 12-05-2011 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 786257)
The new waterbornes do have a tendency to do that - Some of it is corrected by applying less/ spreading more- some by slightly thinning the material . it is a feel thing. Hard to show over the internet.
But it does have a learning curve.

Sagging, or "curtains" is a sign that the paint is being applied too heavily or not being brushed out uniformly enough. You're rolling it on and laying it off. If I was rolling that (I'd be using a mini roller four inch), I'd be working with a dry roller (get the roller wet and primed and roll the excess on a scrap of something to start), and just touching the very edge of the paint in the tray, and most times the amount on the grid part of the tray is enough and where you'll be picking up more paint, only going into the well when the stuff on the grid is gone. Minute amounts. If you constantly go into the paint in the tray everytime, your roller is getting too wet. A very little bit of paint will go a long way on a piece of furniture. Start out with less, you can always add more, but if you re-dip to add a bit more, roll it over the uncovered area then re-roll the whole piece to spread the area more uniformly. It's hard to explain this in print. And lay it off with a similarly dry brush. Other than saying that, I can only add that you have to experiment with it.

Remember, you're having fun learning.

chrisn 12-05-2011 07:38 AM

I knew you could, would explain it better:thumbsup:

Fun2Learn 12-05-2011 10:14 AM

Thanks so much, everyone. I was using a mini 4" roller, but I didn't realize that you had to have such a minute amount of paint on it! I will have to try what J Sheridan suggested and have barely any paint on it. It would be great if you guys could post a You-Tube video showing the technique--a picture is worth a thousand words, as they say! Actually--Sherwin Williams should do it and post a warning about it on their paint cans! Well-- I'm off to sand off those drips for the third time. I'll let you know how it turns out! Thanks again.:thumbsup:

Brushjockey 12-05-2011 11:12 AM

If you go to you tube and search for painting a door you will probably find more than you can watch-
But remember- anyone can post on you tube- so watch several and see if it makes sense and they look like they know what they are doing.
I know a pro who goes by PRoWallGuy who put a many.


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