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Old 08-23-2013, 04:02 AM   #1
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Hello i have been reading and watching videos on youtube to prep deck before staining. So in these videos: . First he uses a stripper to remove old stain and then uses a wood brightener to restore the brightness and then let it dry and sand the whole deck and then he stains it. Where as in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FH28s...UEdDQTzd77QEso. He first sands it (without washing first?) and then washes it using some "Deck wash" and then stains it. So which method is better? Also what type of stain do i need to buy for snowy weather? I have heard theres solid stain, semi-solid, semi transparent and then oil based? Also is the paint specific to a wood type because i have no idea what type of wood is used for my deck.
Thanks looking forward to replies.


Last edited by GanJa; 08-23-2013 at 04:28 AM.
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Old 08-23-2013, 07:33 AM   #2
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Hundreds of threads on here about this very topic. Do a search for "deck staining" and literally dozens and dozens of topics will pop up. Of course, that means lots of reading, but the info is usually "spot on."

Not sure there is any stain specifically made for snowy weather climates. I've used all types of stains on decks that eventually get snow on them. They all perform about the same. Of course, any moisture on a horizontal surface that lays there for long periods of time is gonnna take a toll on the coating. That's why decks need attention every 2 or 3 years no matter what the climate.

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Old 08-23-2013, 07:53 AM   #3
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I reckon that before any of us can offer an opinion on what you need for your deck, we would have to know more about your particular situation...it is for this reason that there's no one 'right' way of staining a deck and definitely not one particular method that does it all - hence the various videos on the subject.

For example, knowing that you get snow doesn't help us as much as knowing if you get full sun, or part shade is, because it is in the long-term UV rays from the sun that will do the most damage to a horizontal deck surface.

Where are you exactly? That information pertains to the availability of certain oil-based stain in your state...

Then, not knowing the type of wood you have is important too. I am going to guess that you don't have anything real exotic, but you may have cedar. You probably have spruce or pine, treated or not...am I right? Ask around.

I also trust that this is not a brand-new deck; so this begs the question: "Well, what stain was on there before?" Was it already stained with something that is now coming off - or does it just look cruddy? in other words what specific problem are you trying to solve with this new application of a stain?

Getting a hold onto the answers to these questions will go a long way in us providing some sort of guidance for you; you should also be aware that staining a deck will last up to about three years, then you'll be back. It's a maintenance chore that goes hand-in-hand with ownership. Good luck!
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:03 AM   #4
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Definitely search other threads for much information on this topic. It is hard to know what to tell you to use on your deck to clean and condition it without knowing what type of wood you have.

As for the stain to use? It depends on how much color you want to, or have to, leave on the surface to blend in color differences or achieve the saturation of color you want. I personally think using solid stains on decks is just asking for increased maintenance but some have sworn by Sherwin Williams solid Deckscapes product. Its Woodscapes product is pretty amazing for vertical surfaces so maybe it will work.

I grew up thinking you needed oil based semi-transparent and semi-solid stains because the solvents penetrated better but I am not so sure that is true anymore. Oil products should keep would from checking so much as waterbased though. All that said, I think it makes more sense to use a waterbased acrylic semi-solid or solid stain where you are going to be leaving pigment on the surface. It will be more colorfast just to start.

Any high quality stain should hold up well in a snowy climate about the same as any other. Just don't by something like Behr. See any number of scathing reviews online. This one, from Deck Stain Help, ranked it as the worst deck product ever tested so far.

http://www.deckstainhelp.com/behr-deck-stain-review/

Now then, as you move up from sealer through semi-transparent stain and finally to a solid stain you loose the original color of the wood grain with each increment to the point none is left with a solid stain. It will retain the texture though. A semi-transparent stain should not leave surface pigment.



As for cleaning? I would start cleaning the deck first. Be careful if using a pressure washer not use more pressure than is required or two fine a tip that will carve up a deck. A scrub brush might be a better choice for a softwood deck. And of course use the least amount of water as possible.

Then, when you have neutralized the cleaner/conditioner and it is dry you can sand. Then either lightly rinse or use a dense broom to remove any sawdust before staining.

Last edited by user1007; 08-23-2013 at 08:16 AM.
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:33 PM   #5
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
I reckon that before any of us can offer an opinion on what you need for your deck, we would have to know more about your particular situation...it is for this reason that there's no one 'right' way of staining a deck and definitely not one particular method that does it all - hence the various videos on the subject.

For example, knowing that you get snow doesn't help us as much as knowing if you get full sun, or part shade is, because it is in the long-term UV rays from the sun that will do the most damage to a horizontal deck surface.

Where are you exactly? That information pertains to the availability of certain oil-based stain in your state...

Then, not knowing the type of wood you have is important too. I am going to guess that you don't have anything real exotic, but you may have cedar. You probably have spruce or pine, treated or not...am I right? Ask around.

I also trust that this is not a brand-new deck; so this begs the question: "Well, what stain was on there before?" Was it already stained with something that is now coming off - or does it just look cruddy? in other words what specific problem are you trying to solve with this new application of a stain?

Getting a hold onto the answers to these questions will go a long way in us providing some sort of guidance for you; you should also be aware that staining a deck will last up to about three years, then you'll be back. It's a maintenance chore that goes hand-in-hand with ownership. Good luck!

Thanks for replying.
To answer your questions:
I live in Canada, Alberta here we get snow for 8 months a year and summers are not that hot. My deck is fully exposed to sun and snow (not partially covered). I was told by one of the deck and fencing contractor that my deck has “pressure treated wood”. Here are the pics:
http://imageshack.us/a/img845/9885/photo2rmtd.jpg
http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/5934/photoewb.jpg
http://img819.imageshack.us/img819/6747/photo1ebp.jpg
According to my observation the deck has a solid stain as you can see in the pics how its peeling off.
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:37 PM   #6
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Definitely search other threads for much information on this topic. It is hard to know what to tell you to use on your deck to clean and condition it without knowing what type of wood you have.

As for the stain to use? It depends on how much color you want to, or have to, leave on the surface to blend in color differences or achieve the saturation of color you want. I personally think using solid stains on decks is just asking for increased maintenance but some have sworn by Sherwin Williams solid Deckscapes product. Its Woodscapes product is pretty amazing for vertical surfaces so maybe it will work.

I grew up thinking you needed oil based semi-transparent and semi-solid stains because the solvents penetrated better but I am not so sure that is true anymore. Oil products should keep would from checking so much as waterbased though. All that said, I think it makes more sense to use a waterbased acrylic semi-solid or solid stain where you are going to be leaving pigment on the surface. It will be more colorfast just to start.

Any high quality stain should hold up well in a snowy climate about the same as any other. Just don't by something like Behr. See any number of scathing reviews online. This one, from Deck Stain Help, ranked it as the worst deck product ever tested so far.

http://www.deckstainhelp.com/behr-deck-stain-review/

Now then, as you move up from sealer through semi-transparent stain and finally to a solid stain you loose the original color of the wood grain with each increment to the point none is left with a solid stain. It will retain the texture though. A semi-transparent stain should not leave surface pigment.



As for cleaning? I would start cleaning the deck first. Be careful if using a pressure washer not use more pressure than is required or two fine a tip that will carve up a deck. A scrub brush might be a better choice for a softwood deck. And of course use the least amount of water as possible.

Then, when you have neutralized the cleaner/conditioner and it is dry you can sand. Then either lightly rinse or use a dense broom to remove any sawdust before staining.
Thanks for replying i think for cleaning i will just use Trisodium phosphate mixed with water and scrub lightly with brush and use garden hose to clean the deck. Then i will let it dry and sand it.
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Old 08-25-2013, 08:35 AM   #7
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Ah-ha; now that we see the pictures, we get a better idea of what you're in for in restoring this deck.

First, you do have a pressure-treated pine deck - pretty standard stuff really, nothing more exotic. But its surface treatment leaves something to be desired however, as I reckon that's a semi-solid or solid, bluish, stain applied everywhere - except for the steps which is newer, untreated work.

Second, we have to ask what your objective is here; is it to remove all the stain (which is some amount of work seeing that it is everywhere) or reapply something similar?

If you want to remove everything, that will take a stain remover (sort of like a paint stripper), neutralization, then reapplication of some new stain.

But if you want to reapply something similar, I would still suggest a deck stain remover. But I wouldn't reapply a solid stain in this case - too much freezing and thawing for most woods.

It's either that or try to sand everything off.
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Old 08-25-2013, 06:18 PM   #8
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Ah-ha; now that we see the pictures, we get a better idea of what you're in for in restoring this deck.

First, you do have a pressure-treated pine deck - pretty standard stuff really, nothing more exotic. But its surface treatment leaves something to be desired however, as I reckon that's a semi-solid or solid, bluish, stain applied everywhere - except for the steps which is newer, untreated work.

Second, we have to ask what your objective is here; is it to remove all the stain (which is some amount of work seeing that it is everywhere) or reapply something similar?

If you want to remove everything, that will take a stain remover (sort of like a paint stripper), neutralization, then reapplication of some new stain.

But if you want to reapply something similar, I would still suggest a deck stain remover. But I wouldn't reapply a solid stain in this case - too much freezing and thawing for most woods.

It's either that or try to sand everything off.
Thx for replying again.

Current stain is greyish colour and my objective is to obviously remove the old stain that is coming off and then re apply the new stain of same colour.

As you can see in my original post my main question is that which method should i follow:
1. Use a paint stripper and brighter and if all the stain doesnt come off using stripper then sand it and stain it?

Or

1. Just wash the deck first using Trisodium phosphate mixed with water and then just sand the whole deck and then stain it?
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:10 AM   #9
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


"As you can see in my original post my main question is that which method should i follow:

1. Use a paint stripper and brighter and if all the stain doesnt come off using stripper then sand it and stain it?

Or

1. Just wash the deck first using Trisodium phosphate mixed with water and then just sand the whole deck and then stain it?"


LOL. I'd say #1

Seriously, in spite of the question about TSP etc, it sure looks like you're determined to sand it - and I mean that's OK as long as you know how much work and what "sanding" implies: perhaps a 16" random orbital sander (rentable) , and a hand-held sander (an orbital sander or a belt sander) to get the parts the orbital sander missed. And that's just for the flat parts...the question is: "do you want to sand a clean deck or sand a stripped deck"? In both cases, why?

BTW: Your boards seem to be screwed in but just in case go around and countersink all proud screwheads - otherwise you'll rip the sander pads to heck.

Back to the question: what sanding does is remove the stain - whatever stain was there originally, oil-based or water-based (we don't know) and a thin layer of wood; this is what you want in order to restain it. But if you had decided to chemically strip the old stain off, then I'd opt for the deck stripper route rather than TSP since the stripper is the more aggressive of the two and is meant to strip off whatever stain was there before, regardless of type.

BUT chemically stripping the deck means neutralizing it afterwards - and proper care handling corrosive chemicals too. Bushes and plants etc..

Look, if sanding's all right in your books, then go for it and forego all the chemicals. You might need them afterwards but that's not for sure.
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Old 09-03-2013, 03:24 AM   #10
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
"As you can see in my original post my main question is that which method should i follow:

1. Use a paint stripper and brighter and if all the stain doesnt come off using stripper then sand it and stain it?

Or

1. Just wash the deck first using Trisodium phosphate mixed with water and then just sand the whole deck and then stain it?"

LOL. I'd say #1

Seriously, in spite of the question about TSP etc, it sure looks like you're determined to sand it - and I mean that's OK as long as you know how much work and what "sanding" implies: perhaps a 16" random orbital sander (rentable) , and a hand-held sander (an orbital sander or a belt sander) to get the parts the orbital sander missed. And that's just for the flat parts...the question is: "do you want to sand a clean deck or sand a stripped deck"? In both cases, why?

BTW: Your boards seem to be screwed in but just in case go around and countersink all proud screwheads - otherwise you'll rip the sander pads to heck.

Back to the question: what sanding does is remove the stain - whatever stain was there originally, oil-based or water-based (we don't know) and a thin layer of wood; this is what you want in order to restain it. But if you had decided to chemically strip the old stain off, then I'd opt for the deck stripper route rather than TSP since the stripper is the more aggressive of the two and is meant to strip off whatever stain was there before, regardless of type.

BUT chemically stripping the deck means neutralizing it afterwards - and proper care handling corrosive chemicals too. Bushes and plants etc..

Look, if sanding's all right in your books, then go for it and forego all the chemicals. You might need them afterwards but that's not for sure.
Thx for replying. Also as you can see i have the new set of stairs without any stain since i got them done last year. So do i need to sand or use the stripper on the new wood as well? Or just stain it after washing it with any cleaner?
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Old 09-04-2013, 07:35 AM   #11
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For complete uniformity between the deckboards and the steps, I'd sand it all.

But the new wood will never match the old wood so for a while anyway, you'll have to live with a deck and a staircase that don't exactly match...now there's no need to be anal about matching deck and staircase, you don't notice it all that much anyways, so I'd go the next best step and that is clean the staircase with a good cleaner to remove the surface dirt - and expose the new wood to new stain like the just-sanded wood. Make sense?
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Old 09-08-2013, 07:31 PM   #12
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


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Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
For complete uniformity between the deckboards and the steps, I'd sand it all.

But the new wood will never match the old wood so for a while anyway, you'll have to live with a deck and a staircase that don't exactly match...now there's no need to be anal about matching deck and staircase, you don't notice it all that much anyways, so I'd go the next best step and that is clean the staircase with a good cleaner to remove the surface dirt - and expose the new wood to new stain like the just-sanded wood. Make sense?

Yes. thx a lot for all ur help. u been great. So i decided to use the solid stain from dulux. because the ballusters and railings are in good condition and theres a solid grey stain on so if i use semi transparent it would look odd.
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:10 PM   #13
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I would not waste my time stripping anything on this deck. The current stain was not maintained, the wood is severely dried out and checked. Pressure wash it carefully without scarring the grain, fix the popping nails by pulling them and putting in stainless steel screws, let it dry out, and apply a solid gray colored penetrating stain in two coats.

The wood is too far gone to attempt stripping and sanding, IMHO.
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Old 09-09-2013, 01:00 AM   #14
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Planning to prep my deck for painting.


Hey guys so i have decided to use the following products:
-http://www.homedepot.ca/product/thompsons-heavy-duty-deck-cleaner/902907
as a stripper and initial cleaner. using pressure washer
-http://www.homedepot.ca/product/thompsons-deck-cleaner-and-brightener/902908
then use this brightner
-http://www.homedepot.ca/product/ridgid-heavy-duty-variable-3-in-x-18-in-belt-sander/906070
then send it using this belt sander
-i have decided to use this stain:
http://www.dulux.ca/en/our-products/...lic-solid.html

I wasnt able to find the deck stain brush on homedepot website online if someone can help me with that? i dont see any 6inch brush on their website

let me know wht u guys think abt the above products
for cleaners i was also contemplating this one : http://www.homedepot.ca/product/deck...cleaner/903436

Last edited by GanJa; 09-09-2013 at 01:25 AM.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:46 AM   #15
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The existing nails will have to be re-set to get them down into the wood so you dont continually rip belts off your belt sander. I would rent a hardwood floor drum sander if you do want to sand it. A 3 inch belt sander will take forever and a day.

Have you considered using one of those deck renew products? You need something that will fill all the cracks.

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