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Michaelpro 02-17-2012 06:28 PM

Painting wood paneling
 
We have some real wood paneling in our living room that I would like to paint. I started to rip it down, but it was glued to the drywall. It was a disaster!

Rather then replacing the drywall or laying additional drywall over the paneling I would just like to paint it. I have filled the lines with joint compound and I think it looks very nice. I painted a section to test, and it covered quite nicely without any sanding before hand.

My main question is can I get away painting the paneling without deglossing it first? Do I have any serious bubbling or other problems to look forward to in the future if I don't sand it or degloss it?

Thanks everyone in advance!

joecaption 02-17-2012 06:53 PM

The paints not going to stay stuck to the wall without degreasing it, sanding it, wipe down again, prime with a bonding primer then paint.

ARC Painting 02-17-2012 06:58 PM

Yes, you are going to have adhesion problems. Prime before painting, it will help cover anyway. And don't use drywall primer! As joe says, a bonding primer. Happy painting!

jaggy 02-17-2012 07:02 PM

Hello I,m a first time poster but I would sand for sure. For the amount of time it takes I think it would be worth it.

Michaelpro 02-17-2012 07:19 PM

Well the walls are clean. Could I use TSP to degloss them and then prime? I can sand if necessary, but hate to do it because these were put up in the 60s (afraid of lead.)

Bonding primer is a different story. I live in a small town and I don't remember seeing that type of primer at any of the hardware stores.

joecaption 02-17-2012 07:23 PM

Were the walls painted or were they poly over the wood?
If it's poly there is no asbesto.

Michaelpro 02-17-2012 07:27 PM

I am not entirely sure, but I would say most likely painted. I can post a picture if you like.

BraniksPainting 02-18-2012 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michaelpro (Post 856139)
Well the walls are clean. Could I use TSP to degloss them and then prime? I can sand if necessary, but hate to do it because these were put up in the 60s (afraid of lead.)

Bonding primer is a different story. I live in a small town and I don't remember seeing that type of primer at any of the hardware stores.

You won't be able to use TSP as a deglosser.
TSP is only a cleaner. Sherwin Williams, PPG, Benjamin Moore all sell deglosser. SW sells bonding primer. Not sure of the other stores. Wear a mask with the deglosser....it's potent stuff.

Michaelpro 02-18-2012 04:57 PM

Thanks for all the input.

Sanded deglossed and cleaned using tsp. On some pieces of the paneling there is brown splotchy stains coming up after I primed it. What could that be?

The section that I did not sand degloss and clean looks perfect. This doesn't make any sense.

Michaelpro 02-18-2012 05:01 PM

2 Attachment(s)
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jsheridan 02-18-2012 05:35 PM

The brown haze/splotchiness is tannin. You need to prime with shellac based primer, or an oil primer that will hold back tannin. Your best bet is the shellac though.

Michaelpro 02-18-2012 07:32 PM

Just curious though. Why would this show up now? Is it because I used primer or the tsp?

The test section I did where I just used the paint doesn't look anything like this.

BraniksPainting 02-18-2012 10:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michaelpro (Post 856910)
Just curious though. Why would this show up now? Is it because I used primer or the tsp?

The test section I did where I just used the paint doesn't look anything like this.

What type of primer did you use? TSP has nothing to do with what you are seeing. TSP is mearly a cleaner. And honestly, you probably don't even need the TSP unless the wood was heavily soiled from a smoker or grease of some kind.

If you use the wrong primer the stains will eventually come through. Maybe not in a week, maybe not in a month but they will come through. Same thing will happen if you just paint over the wood without primer.

Follow all of our advice (joecaption, ARC) and please get some bonding primer.

jsheridan 02-18-2012 11:53 PM

The discoloration is either nicotine or tannin acid in the wood paneling. You have two problems to solve, adhesion and stain blocking. There are latex bonding primers that claim to seal tannin bleed, but I don't trust them for that with heavy tannin over the long term, they're a "good" choice. You can use oil based Zinsser Cover Stain, which will solve both problems and is a "better" versus latex. The "best" choice to solve both problems is Zinsser BIN shellac based primer. It has superior adhesion and stain blocking properties and will give you the most peace of mind. You need more than a simple bonding primer. In fact, if you sanded the paneling well enough, bonding may not even be an issue, but the stain, your biggest problem, needs the proper treatment.

Michaelpro 02-19-2012 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 857080)
The discoloration is either nicotine or tannin acid in the wood paneling. You have two problems to solve, adhesion and stain blocking. There are latex bonding primers that claim to seal tannin bleed, but I don't trust them for that with heavy tannin over the long term, they're a "good" choice. You can use oil based Zinsser Cover Stain, which will solve both problems and is a "better" versus latex. The "best" choice to solve both problems is Zinsser BIN shellac based primer. It has superior adhesion and stain blocking properties and will give you the most peace of mind. You need more than a simple bonding primer. In fact, if you sanded the paneling well enough, bonding may not even be an issue, but the stain, your biggest problem, needs the proper treatment.

Oh my has this been an ordeal.

I got some Kilz heavy stain blocking primer. I can't get Zinsser in this town, for some reason no one has it. The Kilz is oil based and the people at the hardware store nor a Google search can give me a straight answer as to if it is okay to cover up the existing latex with the new oil based.

The label says I can paint OVER the primer with latex or oil, but doesn't specify what it can be painted ONTO. It just says to make sure that the existing paint isn't peeling.

Opinions?


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