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-   -   Painting White Dresser - Sealing Question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/painting-white-dresser-sealing-question-120087/)

KathleenT 10-14-2011 06:04 AM

Painting White Dresser - Sealing Question
 
Hello everyone,

I have read through some threads and have found pretty much what I am looking for but had another question..

I bought a dresser from a thrift shop, sanded it, primed it with Rustoleum Primer Spray Paint (believe all sprays are oil based?) and then covered it with wipe on poly (oil based), I only used one coat when I discovered online that it leads to yellowing. So I went back and sure enough there was some yellowing in places where the poly had gathered after only 2 days. So I sanded it down to the flat paint. But now I have a kind of sticky peely gummy residue in certain places of the dresser, maybe where the poly went on thick? Is it okay to use mineral spirits to remove gumminess before I repaint or will that ruin the flat white underneath? When I hit those spots with the sander it seems to just catch it and push it around. Or would you suggest something else?

Also the reason that I used the flat white is because I thought I would be applying a poly over it afterwards and thought that would be where the sheen would come from. :(

I have heard that if I use a good paint then that will seal the job on itself, but would you consider Rustoleum spray paint a good paint that will protect my piece of furniture from water spills, dings cat claws etc?

Thank you so much and sorry for so many questions. I am a newby diyer trying to save a little money by refinishing.

Many thanks to you all!

Kathleen

kkeith 10-14-2011 08:11 AM

You can use mineral spirits (paint thinner) to try to remove any residual polyurethane if it is still tacky. It may remove some of the white primer if it has not cured and was oil based.
I would not have used your method of getting a gloss finish though. If you want a glossier hard finish, just use a paint with a sheen. All oil based paints do yellow, so I would go with a high quality acrylic paint. Go to a real paint store and tell them you need a "non blocking" interior acrylic enamel. A good example is Sherwin Williams Pro Classic, or Benjamin Moore's Ironclad. They both dry hard and are used on cabinets etc. I don't know where you are but both brands are nationwide.
If you still want to stick with your original method. There are some polyurethanes that are supposedly non yellowing, and would have a tagline like "water white" or water clear, and there are even water clean up polyurethanes that should not yellow, but read the label to verify.
Don't try using spray cans, use a quality brush and quality paint.

jsheridan 10-14-2011 08:56 AM

I agree with Keith. A flat, even oil, will be less resistant to marring than a sheen finish. Generally, the higher the sheen, the more durable the finish. A gloss finish will require no poly for protection. With that said, I have purposely used oil poly for exactly the reason that it yellows, which enhances the aged look of a piece. Also, you could apply poly over a gloss to add depth to the finish look, the more coats, the more depth. If you continue on your path, allow the white to cure before wiping with thinner. Or, allow the tackiness to harden, sand it, and apply a new paint finish.

jschaben 10-14-2011 12:14 PM

For a durable, hi gloss finish from rattle cans, I've had pretty good luck with Appliance Epoxy from Rustoleum. Going over wood/plywood I use an automotive sanding primer to avoid raising the grain to much, sand it smooth and hit it with the epoxy. Has been working for me. :)

KathleenT 10-14-2011 07:32 PM

Thank you all so much for your response. I have learned so much! I honestly always thought you had to apply a sealer or hardener to paint, guess I have always used cheap paint. :)

Right now I have a layer of primer and flat white spray paint, is it okay to apply the acrylic enamel over oil paint? That will not lead to peeling or any other negative effects on the dresser paint job?

kkeith 10-14-2011 09:06 PM

As Joe was saying if you sand the existing paint and continue you should be OK. The flat paints and primers provide good grip for succeeding coats, and the paints I mentioned provide excellent adhesion, unless someone thinks of something I missed. I liked Joe's idea of adding coats of clear finishes that will amber to create an aged effect. I may try that on future projects.

Heidi1 10-25-2013 05:00 AM

Need Help
 
I am two minutes new to this site. This question closely resembles mine. I hope I'm not stepping on toes jumping in like this: I'm about to paint a kitchen cart with flat interior paint. I love the look of flat, and want to keep it. However, I need to know what to use to seal it so I can wash it later. Thank you for any help. Also, if this was not the place to ask, enlighten me please.

chrisn 10-25-2013 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Heidi1 (Post 1257823)
I am two minutes new to this site. This question closely resembles mine. I hope I'm not stepping on toes jumping in like this: I'm about to paint a kitchen cart with flat interior paint. I love the look of flat, and want to keep it. However, I need to know what to use to seal it so I can wash it later. Thank you for any help. Also, if this was not the place to ask, enlighten me please.

The thread is a couple years old, so I doubt anyone's toes are getting hurt.
This IS the place to ask but probably starting your own thread would have been best. I am not a fan of putting anything on (or over) paint to seal it. I would use a high quality semi gloss and be done with it. Someone else will have info for what you want to do.

kkeith 10-25-2013 08:50 AM

Flat on furniture
 
If you love the look of flat, you will have to put up with its drawbacks such as not being as washable, or burnishing and scuffing of the surface. My mother liked to paint furniture with flat, and then she would rub it all over with a crinkled piece brown paper bag, which would evenly burnish it. Something she learned in an art class. Other options are to use a flat enamel, which will be more washable, or a flat polyurethane top coat, if you can find one.

chrisn 10-25-2013 03:29 PM

http://www.idgsupply.com/p/Rustoleum...ff512fc3dcc96b


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