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Old 04-17-2012, 02:16 PM   #1
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Painting trim - first timer


Hi everyone. We are preparing to paint the wood baseboards in our house, as well as the walls. Our house was built about 2 years ago and the baseboard is an oak color. We plan to paint it white. I went to Home Depot last night to get the supplies and had a few questions.

1. Is it okay to use Behr Ultra Premium paint with the built-in primer? I know we will have to sand the wood. If we use this paint, how many coats will we have to do?

2. How difficult is it to paint the woodwork with a water-based paint?

3. I would like to paint the trim first, before the walls. If I do paint the trim first, how long will I need to wait before starting on the walls? Can I apply frog tape to the painted woodwork, or do I have to use a different type of tape to make sure it doesn't pull the paint off?

I appreciate any advice!

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Old 04-17-2012, 02:43 PM   #2
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Painting trim - first timer


Sand lightly with a fine grit paper to scruff up the surface of your baseboards. This will provide a better surface for the primer to adhere.

I would use a real bonding primer/underlay first and then a nice semi-gloss. I like alkyd oil-based primers but they are not even available in some places anymore. Latex primers will work too.

There is no such thing as paint and primer in one. Everybody advertises self-priming and other nonsense but is pure marketing gimmickery.

You will be much happier with real primer and paint from a paint store if you can take the BEHR back. Stores should be running spring sales now. I read a post earlier stating Sherwin Williams is 40 percent off. Benjamin Moore must be also. See the many comments from those of us who painted for a living and from posters who were disappointed with BEHR. Even comments on the Consumer Reports site are fairly scathing.

Be sure and caulk any gaps between the woodwork and the walls with a flexible and paintable caulk before you paint. This will give your job a nice finished and professional look with no gaps.

No problem using an acrylic latex semi-gloss on the trim. I liked adding Floetrol to even out brush marks but it is not really necessary with quality paint. Note that it will take a full 30 days or so to cure but will be dry enough to the touch to paint the walls in an hour or two. Applying and removing tape is another matter.

I think you will find that if you use a good, quality, 2.5" angled sash brush and practice a bit you may not need tape to cut in the walls to the trim. Expect to pay $15 or so retail but if you take care of it, you will have the brush a long time. Don't buy cheap brushes---there really is no such thing! You will fight them holding and flowing paint unevenly and you will waste lots of time picking bristles off the surface. You will likely end up with a horribly rough surface from the coarseness and poor trim of the brush.

If not using tape, I would paint the trim first. It is easier to cut the wall into the trim than the trim edge neatly to the wall.

If you plan to use tape, I would paint the walls first and tape them so you can paint the trim. It is a lot easier to tape the walls than the edge of the trim. You will not risk pulling uncured trim paint off with the tape.

I would use at least a 3/8" nap roller cover if not 1/2" on your walls. Step up the thickness if the walls are textured.

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Old 04-17-2012, 02:51 PM   #3
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Painting trim - first timer


Thank you for the response! Yes, after I posted this, I did a bit of research. I didn't buy any paint, just picked up some samples.

I did purchase some brushes...it was a set of Purdy's and the kind that said it was meant for latex paint. What specific brushes should I be looking for?

As for "cutting in" I'll have to read up on this technique.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:21 PM   #4
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Purdy and Wooster are my two fave brands of brushes. You will probably have little use for most in the set though. As mentioned, you will find that once you are accustomed to it, you will use a 2.5 (or maybe 3") angled sash brush for near everything. With practice you can almost draw lines with the edge. Smaller brushes are great for tight spaces and specialized situations but do not hold enough paint for anything too serious.

"Cutting in" simply refers to painting where two painted surfaces meet---wall to ceiling or wall to trim for example. Usually there is a color or surface change involved. If I suggest cutting in the wall to the trim it means I am bringing the wall color to the trim. If I were to cut in the trim to the wall I would be bringing the trim edge to the wall. Obviously it is easier to cut in the wall to the trim as the trim edge is only an 1" or most of the time. Cutting in edges also fills in the area you cannot reach with a roller.
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:26 PM   #5
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Painting trim - first timer


Paint the walls first

Let me clarify that first statement. First paint all the returns( bottom of crown, door and window edges with the trim paint, no need to do the base. THEN paint the walls , then finish up the trim. Of corse do the ceiling before any of this.

Last edited by chrisn; 04-20-2012 at 04:52 PM.
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:37 PM   #6
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Paint the walls first
I disagree. I think it's much easier to cut the walls into the trim than it is to cut the trim into the walls. If you do the walls first, then you're cutting in along a very narrow width of surface, the side of the trim, and you risk runs along the edge particularly if you're a novice.

If you paint the trim and then cut the walls into the trim, you can zip pretty quickly around doors and windows.

Unless you have narrow mullions on your windows that you're going to need to paint, you can honestly do 100% of interior brush work on walls and trim with a 2.5" angled sash brush. Purdy is my favorite as well.

Get a smaller bucket that you can pour paint into to carry around while painting trim and cutting in. Much easier, cleaner, faster, and less risky than working from a full bucket.

Try and do your cutting in on windows and doors by hand. It's much faster than using tape and is not that hard once you get the hang of it. Look on Youtube and search on "cutting in painting" for demonstration videos that show you how.

Cutting in the top of the wall to the ceiling is a bit more challenging. If you're not painting the ceiling itself, I would probably tape it off and do it that way, but be prepared for a little leakage here and there under the tape where you will need to to touchups.
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Old 04-19-2012, 09:41 PM   #7
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Painting trim - first timer


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Originally Posted by ashionista View Post
Hi everyone. We are preparing to paint the wood baseboards in our house, as well as the walls. Our house was built about 2 years ago and the baseboard is an oak color. We plan to paint it white. I went to Home Depot last night to get the supplies and had a few questions.

1. Is it okay to use Behr Ultra Premium paint with the built-in primer? I know we will have to sand the wood. If we use this paint, how many coats will we have to do?

2. How difficult is it to paint the woodwork with a water-based paint?

3. I would like to paint the trim first, before the walls. If I do paint the trim first, how long will I need to wait before starting on the walls? Can I apply frog tape to the painted woodwork, or do I have to use a different type of tape to make sure it doesn't pull the paint off?

I appreciate any advice!
Behr Ultra Premium "paint and primer in one" does self prime, and does a pretty nice job. I personally prefer Benjamin Moore over Behr, but it is more expensive. If you want to use the Behr paint & primer in one, go ahead, it works as advertised IMO.
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Old 04-20-2012, 01:10 AM   #8
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Get a smaller bucket that you can pour paint into to carry around while painting trim and cutting in. Much easier, cleaner, faster, and less risky than working from a full bucket.
They sell all kinds of things with handles at the paint store for $$$$. I used to visit the kitchen section of dollar stores for small containers. Some came with handles and even covers for $1. Plastic coffee containers work well but are a little hard to grip. For some reason the dollar store near me also seemed to have stacks of really nice, molded plastic roller trays for $1. They were easy to clean but cheap enough to throw away. They were rigid and you didn't need a tray liner.

I tried never to work from the actual paint can. No reason to gunk the paint up with any dust or whatever that might linger on the walls or trim or the residue that forms from dragging the brush on the edge.
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Old 04-20-2012, 07:33 AM   #9
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Behr Ultra Premium "paint and primer in one" does self prime, and does a pretty nice job. I personally prefer Benjamin Moore over Behr, but it is more expensive. If you want to use the Behr paint & primer in one, go ahead, it works as advertised IMO.
I used a Behr semi-gloss to paint an interior closet door and it is junk. It looked terrible and was super thick, didn't cover well at all. I'd go with anything but Behr for your trim. We just did our bathroom with SW ProClassic and it came out beautiful. It's made for doors and trim. I think SW Superpaint semi-gloss and BM Impervo-waterborne are also solid options. We used the oil based Impervo to match trim in our spare room but it does become an off-white over time. People seem to like the waterborne Impervo as it stays white.
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Old 04-20-2012, 04:56 PM   #10
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Behr Ultra Premium "paint and primer in one" does self prime, and does a pretty nice job. I personally prefer Benjamin Moore over Behr, but it is more expensive. If you want to use the Behr paint & primer in one, go ahead, it works as advertised IMO.

How? Please explain how the primer jumps on the wall before the paint?
This is just a marketing scheme, there is no such thing as paint and primer in one.


http://buildipedia.com/at-home/painting/paint-vs-primer
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Old 04-20-2012, 05:13 PM   #11
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How? Please explain how the primer jumps on the wall before the paint?
Hey, there is shampoo and conditioner in one, so why not paint and primer?
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Old 04-20-2012, 05:19 PM   #12
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When you don't actually need a primer ( recoating already painted walls with no problems) it works fine that way.
Primers are problem solvers- no problem, no primer!
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:35 PM   #13
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How? Please explain how the primer jumps on the wall before the paint?
This is just a marketing scheme, there is no such thing as paint and primer in one.


http://buildipedia.com/at-home/painting/paint-vs-primer
I never said the "primer jumps on the wall before the paint". I said it is "self-priming". And it works. If you want to know the technology behind, look it up, or go ask a chemist. You say it's a marketing ploy- I believe technology changes over time, and we are now at a time when can you apply two coats of paint (with primer in it) to a surface and be successful. If you would prefer to use a separate primer coat, and then 2 coats of paint, feel free to do the extra coat. If you tell me you can do 1 coat of primer and only 1 coat of paint, I can just as easily reply that there is no such thing as a 1-coat paint, it's a marketing ploy.

I did also say that I prefer the other way, and even another brand, but I did use the new Behr stuff and it works. I used it on bare wood, on vinyl porch posts, and on Azek (PVC trim), and it worked pretty nicely. It's been up for over a year and looks good so far.
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Old 04-20-2012, 10:11 PM   #14
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BTW- we have a chemist on board- ric knows paint. You are partly right.
BUT- there are many primers that do (solve) many things. the PiP stuff only works in very limited ways. So it is VERY misleading to someone who doesn't know a bleed from a flash.
Know the problem- know the primer for it.
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Old 04-20-2012, 11:49 PM   #15
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BTW- we have a chemist on board- ric knows paint. You are partly right.
BUT- there are many primers that do (solve) many things. the PiP stuff only works in very limited ways. So it is VERY misleading to someone who doesn't know a bleed from a flash.
Know the problem- know the primer for it.
I'm glad you said this, because my only point is just people who say it's fake, or a marketing ploy, are also being misleading. I think it is another tool in the toolbox, and has it's uses, if you choose to use it. I don't think it replaces a true primer when a primer is needed, but it does render a separate primer coat unnecessary in many situations that previously would have called for a primer coat.

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