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joefromcal 05-23-2013 12:27 AM

Painting stucco
 
Hello, my house has a stucco exterior and I wish to paint it and paint it a different color that it presently is. I have two questions: 1) First of all, I've heard that stucco should preferably not be painted. Others have said if you do paint it to use an elastomeric paint. Others have said that if you paint it the stucco doesn't actually breathe. Are there any pro's out there who can give me some definitive info on this? & 2) I'm thinking about applying a Portland cement based paint that comes in a powder form which you mix with water. The color comes pre-mixed into the cement. If I do do this, it'll be important for me to know if my present stucco had the paint mixed into the outer stucco coat or if the paint was applied (painted onto) on top of the outer coat. How can I determine this? Thank you

Jmayspaint 05-23-2013 07:06 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by joefromcal
Hello, my house has a stucco exterior and I wish to paint it and paint it a different color that it presently is. I have two questions: 1) First of all, I've heard that stucco should preferably not be painted. Others have said if you do paint it to use an elastomeric paint. Others have said that if you paint it the stucco doesn't actually breathe. Are there any pro's out there who can give me some definitive info on this? & 2) I'm thinking about applying a Portland cement based paint that comes in a powder form which you mix with water. The color comes pre-mixed into the cement. If I do do this, it'll be important for me to know if my present stucco had the paint mixed into the outer stucco coat or if the paint was applied (painted onto) on top of the outer coat. How can I determine this? Thank you

One of the properties I do maintainance on has the pre mixed color in the stucco on the house and garage. For some reason, the stucco on the guest house was not tinted, and had to be painted to match the tinted stucco on the house.

I used a high quality flat exterior paint on the un-tinted stucco. Elastomeric paints are good for stucco, but not absolutely necessary if the stucco is sound and in good condition.
To me the pre-tinted stucco has a more 'organic' , or 'washed out' look than the painted. It looks kinda blotchy, with light and dark areas while the painted looked more solid. Also, you could look for evidence of paint on things besides the stucco. If its painted, its unlikely a perfect job was done and you can probably find some paint specks somewhere.

The first pic is painted stucco. The second in pre tinted. You have to look around the doors, as they were what I took the pics for.

Third pic is a view of pre-tinted stucco from farther away. You can see the "blotchy ness " of the pre mix to an extent.

ToolSeeker 05-23-2013 08:02 AM

From the land of stucco Fla. just try to find a house down here that isn't stucco. There are some but they are few. And I totally agree with J. I have never used that portland cement paint and I don't think I would. Seems like it would change the texture of the existing. And I have run into that same blotchy washed out look on colored stucco. Stucco is a LOT easier if you can spray it because of the rough texture, but if you can't spray get the largest nap roller you can find usually 1 1/2" if you don't around the rough spots when you are done you will see these little spots of the old paint. We used to call them holidays (don't know why) but they are a royal pita. Also if you can't spray you may look into renting a sprayer with a power roller attachment, again with the big nap roller cover.

Canarywood1 05-23-2013 11:55 AM

+1 to what toolseeker said,just use a quality acrylic latex,and your good to go.

ccarlisle 05-23-2013 12:51 PM

I think, generally, that that's true i.e. that stucco can be painted with an acrylic latex, or an elastomeric, paint. It comes down to the particular characteristics of each wall - but in general that's true.

Because most walls have to breathe - mostly in or mostly out, some in between, depending on where you are geographicaly - and each wall system takes the transmission of vapour into account at the building stage. Stucco doesn't breathe on it's own - the wall system does...so painting stucco shouldn't mess with that transmission - or you'll let yourself in for greater problems down the road. So the answer to the question "Shall I paint my stucco?" is case-dependant.

They do in Florida; they probably do elsewhere. But just because they do so in Florida doesn't mean you should do it the same way in Detroit.

ToolSeeker 05-23-2013 06:17 PM

HUH? :confused1:

joefromcal 05-23-2013 08:58 PM

Thank you all for your replies. Jmayspaint, I love those double doors of yours in the top photo.

ccarlisle 05-24-2013 10:13 AM

It really comes down to this, and the reason why you should put your location in your avitar (if you haven't done so already): it depends on where you are geographically.

So - and in this case we're talking about stucco - the answers you get from Florida may not be accepted where you are, nor where I am. First we have to know what stucco you have: three-coat or what? Then we have to know what wall assembly you have: stick-frame or concrete block? Ideally we'd like to know how old the structure is, are there any cracks and if you've insulated recently...

Now we get down to the details on the paint; are you thinking regular latex, acrylic latex or elastomeric? Spray, or roller and brush? Believe it or not, each of these answers has an impact on your particular wall(s). So you are considering a concrete mixture...that's good too.

I am just saying that although an acrylic latex may be an acceptable choice, getting the most benefit from whichever choice you make depends on a lot of other things - or in other words, what goes somewhere may not go everywhere.

ToolSeeker 05-24-2013 11:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccarlisle (Post 1186513)
It really comes down to this, and the reason why you should put your location in your avitar (if you haven't done so already): it depends on where you are geographically.

So - and in this case we're talking about stucco - the answers you get from Florida may not be accepted where you are, nor where I am. First we have to know what stucco you have: three-coat or what? Then we have to know what wall assembly you have: stick-frame or concrete block? Ideally we'd like to know how old the structure is, are there any cracks and if you've insulated recently...

Now we get down to the details on the paint; are you thinking regular latex, acrylic latex or elastomeric? Spray, or roller and brush? Believe it or not, each of these answers has an impact on your particular wall(s). So you are considering a concrete mixture...that's good too.

I am just saying that although an acrylic latex may be an acceptable choice, getting the most benefit from whichever choice you make depends on a lot of other things - or in other words, what goes somewhere may not go everywhere.

You do understand we're just painting the house don't you?

ccarlisle 05-24-2013 11:32 AM

Yup, I did get it that a house was being painted; now, what is it in what I said that's got you confused?

ToolSeeker 05-24-2013 11:47 AM

Just about everything.

ccarlisle 05-24-2013 12:02 PM

Then you're in the wrong chatroom.

ToolSeeker 05-25-2013 06:56 AM

Maybe your right. In all the years I have never asked what kind of insulation do you have, what kinda framing do you have, do your walls breath OK. In fact I just did a stucco house that was block, except for 2 additions they were stick framed, block had styrofoam insulation, stick had batt. now what. And if I choose to roll or brush how that would impact your wall? And I have painted houses a lot of places other than Fla. And in what area is latex house paint not acceptable.


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