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Old 08-08-2011, 03:38 PM   #1
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Painting stained trim and doors


Need opinions on how to best tackle painting the stained trim and doors in this office.

Trim is about 15 years old and looks like it was originally stained. Slightly 'shiny' looking, but not overly glossy by any means.

I plan on first using Sherwin Williams Multi-Purpose latex primer, and will first try and apply it without sanding the surface and see how that works.

How about the french door? What is the best way to tackle the glass in it? Should I blue tape it all up and then prime and paint it? Or just do the best I can and razor blade off the excess paint? I want the inner edges of the glass to be as covered and perfect as possible. Should I remove the door(s) to paint also?

Thanks for any tips to make this process as painless as possible.
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Old 08-08-2011, 03:45 PM   #2
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Painting stained trim and doors


The SW multipurpose states compatibility with glossy paints, but not varnishes or urethanes. I'd use a tried and true primer rated for all coatings - Zinsser Bin is my favorite.

Definitely take the doors down to paint them. Remove all of the hardware. I like to tape the glass.

I'd use the 6" foam rollers and a good Purdy brush for the muntins and other detail work.

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Old 08-08-2011, 03:58 PM   #3
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Painting stained trim and doors


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The SW multipurpose states compatibility with glossy paints, but not varnishes or urethanes. I'd use a tried and true primer rated for all coatings - Zinsser Bin is my favorite.

Definitely take the doors down to paint them. Remove all of the hardware. I like to tape the glass.

I'd use the 6" foam rollers and a good Purdy brush for the muntins and other detail work.
No sanding necessary with Zinsser Bin?
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Old 08-08-2011, 04:35 PM   #4
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Painting stained trim and doors


No scuffing/sanding necessary, but it has to be clean and dry.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:34 AM   #5
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Painting stained trim and doors


The problem with not sanding is that sometimes stained/clearcoated work doesn't have the paint quality feel as to smoothness. To smooth that after the priming may result in removing much of the primer. It's always good practice to sand surfaces prior to priming, because bonding is not the only reason for sanding. As to primer, that application is not exactly the best to learn the ropes with BIN. But, that would be my choice. I can give you some tips if you're interested and choose it. If you choose bin, opt not to get paint on the glass with the intention of blading it later, bin sticks to glass, and that glass looks beveled, which is harder to blade. Good Luck.
Joe
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Old 08-09-2011, 08:36 AM   #6
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Painting stained trim and doors


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The problem with not sanding is that sometimes stained/clearcoated work doesn't have the paint quality feel as to smoothness. To smooth that after the priming may result in removing much of the primer. It's always good practice to sand surfaces prior to priming, because bonding is not the only reason for sanding. As to primer, that application is not exactly the best to learn the ropes with BIN. But, that would be my choice. I can give you some tips if you're interested and choose it. If you choose bin, opt not to get paint on the glass with the intention of blading it later, bin sticks to glass, and that glass looks beveled, which is harder to blade. Good Luck.
Joe
I am definitely interested in any tips or suggestions you can give regarding using BIN or my Sherwin Williams Super Paint which I absolutely love.

The only reason I mentioned **not** blue taping the glass was to make sure that I got all the cracks around the glass covered sufficiently. I was worried about blue taping it and then painting, and then pulling the tape off and then seeing exposed bare wood around the glass, thus why I mentioned using a blade to scrape. Sounds like this is a bad idea, and I should and will blue tape.

If the bare wood feels smooth already, should I sand it? What grit sandpaper should I use?

I want the highest quality finished product, so I am not adverse to necessary extra work, but only if it is **necessary**.
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:05 AM   #7
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Painting stained trim and doors


Bin has a different consistency than most paint & primer. Almost like heavy milk. It does take a bit to take used to, but it dries in about 45 mins and can be sanded if necessary.

As far as sanding the current finish - Since it's basically smooth now, I'd maybe hit the flat spots with 220 grit on a Random Orbit Sander and not touch the muntins unless there is a specific area that needs attention. If you're not using a gloss paint, I wouldn't bother sanding at all. Definitely do not touch the glass with the sand paper. Fine grit 3M sanding sponge for the door casing and other intricate pieces, if necessary.

Use a razor blade when taping the glass. Run tape along one edge, overlapping at the sides, then push in and cut these tight in the corners with the blade. Be careful when painting not to build to much between the wood & the tape. When you're done, carefully run the blade along the edge to give a nice, clean edge, then pull the tape.
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:10 AM   #8
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Painting stained trim and doors


I'm using semi-gloss, so it sounds like I am hearing what I want to hear - no sanding necessary!!

Thanks for the taping and painting tips. Good stuff.
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Old 08-09-2011, 05:51 PM   #9
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Painting stained trim and doors


Why use Bin?

Scruff sand it , clean, a coat of Fresh Start, paint.

I see no need for Bin in this application at all.
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Old 08-09-2011, 06:31 PM   #10
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Why use Bin?

Scruff sand it , clean, a coat of Fresh Start, paint.

I see no need for Bin in this application at all.
Ok, I just got back from the Depot with a $40 gallon of BIN.

Do I really need this stuff?

As mentioned earlier, I also have a < $20 gallon of Sherwin Williams multi-purpose primer which the Sherwin Williams clerk 'recommended'.

Standing by......
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Old 08-09-2011, 08:09 PM   #11
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Painting stained trim and doors


Hey noone, you can get away with a latex primer if you choose. I would just like a shellac barrier between my latex and that stain and any possible tannin that may be apparent but can't be seen because of the stain. But then again, I don't have concerns working with shellac, and I can certainly understand your hesitancy. Your big concern is to get a good bond with the primer. I see so many instances of paint chipping and peeling down to brown stain. If you use a bonding primer, you only need a light scuff sand, nothing too strenuous. Some will tell you no sanding with bonding primer, but I always err on the side of caution, as well as getting a smooth finish. You're only going to pass this way one time, get the most out of it. I would start on the crown molding, then do the other doors, saving the french door for last after your brush is warmed up. Good Luck. keep us posted.
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Old 08-09-2011, 08:55 PM   #12
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Painting stained trim and doors


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Hey noone, you can get away with a latex primer if you choose. I would just like a shellac barrier between my latex and that stain and any possible tannin that may be apparent but can't be seen because of the stain. But then again, I don't have concerns working with shellac, and I can certainly understand your hesitancy. Your big concern is to get a good bond with the primer. I see so many instances of paint chipping and peeling down to brown stain. If you use a bonding primer, you only need a light scuff sand, nothing too strenuous. Some will tell you no sanding with bonding primer, but I always err on the side of caution, as well as getting a smooth finish. You're only going to pass this way one time, get the most out of it. I would start on the crown molding, then do the other doors, saving the french door for last after your brush is warmed up. Good Luck. keep us posted.
Decisions, decisions.

I don't mind the $$ spent on the BIN, but I want to ensure that spending more $$ isn't going to make my life harder.


Is BIN harder to work with than just the regular latex primer? Can a DIYer like myself who has probably painted 10 large rooms with crown in his lifetime handle BIN?

Also, wondering if the 'multi-purpose' SW primer is the right primer for this job. It doesn't say it's specifically for varnished wood like their 'Adhesion Primer', but maybe this 'Adhesion Primer' is just Sherwin William's version of BIN?

Probably over thinking all of this, but good conversation at any rate.....
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Old 08-09-2011, 10:16 PM   #13
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Painting stained trim and doors


ok lightly sand ,these guys recommending lightly sanding are painters ,when they do a job its done right .if they thought you could do it with out sanding they wouldn't. with that being said all your doing is deglossing ,i mean run your hand up and down every square inch .this is easy ,quick ,and necessary. bin will grip but its not my choice i think it drys too hard and does not hold paint on edges as well as a oil . i would use zinsser cover stain with a nylon polyester brush in leaves fewer brush marks than china bristle .if you choose to go latex bonding primer that's ok .i would go sherwin williams adhesion ,then 2 coats super paint or pro classic. pro classic has a little learning curve to using it. but when done right it looks like old schoo oil

Last edited by ltd; 08-09-2011 at 10:18 PM.
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Old 08-10-2011, 12:00 AM   #14
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Painting stained trim and doors


If you know what the coating is now, then find a primer rated for it.

I use BIN in this type of situation because, chances are, you don't know what it is. BIN is rated for all coatings - "You can't go wrong".

BIN is harder to work with than latex. It dries very quickly and is pretty soupy. It also smells like strong whiskey. Cleanup requires denatured alcohol.

If you decide to go with a latex primer, look up how to determine what you're working with (as far as the current finish) and how to prep it for latex. At minimum, it will require a good sanding to degloss. Worst case, you'll need to strip it completely.

Btw, BIN goes a long way. You'd probably need a quart or less for that job.
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Old 08-10-2011, 05:59 AM   #15
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Painting stained trim and doors


i agree with BIN.. unless you know what was used to coat your wood. also its true you dont have to sand.. but if you dont it will be noticeable and you will wish you did. get ready to have a tube of ALEX 25 caulk handy your gonna need it when the gaps start popping out behind the white color.

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