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net_tech 10-20-2011 10:17 AM

painting a room with crown molding
 
I need to paint a room with crown molding. For ceiling I am using Benjamin Moore Waterborne Ceiling Paint (off white), crown is semi-gloss white, walls are brown. When I cut the ceiling, do i need to worry about getting ceiling paint on the crown? I am guessing when I cut the crown, semi-gloss will cover ceiling paint that gets on the crown

Thanks

ltd 10-20-2011 12:00 PM

yep that's right but just feather it on dont have a build up paint that's leaves ridges.you can also do the same for the crown to the wall.

m1951mm 10-20-2011 12:34 PM

You are right LTD, as long as the poster knows what feathering is. Feathering is making sure there are no hard lines left of paint that will dry to leave ridges for the second coat coming. Taking the tip of the brush and smooth out the overage on the crown or other surface that will be painted next. P.S. tape is for securing boxes, not for painting :thumbsup:.

net_tech 10-20-2011 01:27 PM

Thank you for your comments

What brush would you recommend for cut in work round or 2.5 angled XL Purdy?

chrisn 10-20-2011 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by net_tech (Post 752886)
Thank you for your comments

What brush would you recommend for cut in work round or 2.5 angled XL Purdy?


I use a 2 1/2 for almost everything( although not necessairly a Purdy)

Gymschu 10-20-2011 04:33 PM

I know a lot of painters swear by their Purdy brushes, but, I love Wooster brushes best.

Brushjockey 10-20-2011 05:16 PM

Wooster Alpha FTW!
(Painters argue over this stuff all the time!)

chrisn 10-21-2011 04:12 AM

Hence my comment

"I use a 2 1/2 for almost everything( although not necessarily a Purdy) "

jsheridan 10-21-2011 06:12 AM

Net tech, any time you have a color or finish change, paint should be overlapped onto the joining surface. If, of course, both surfaces are being painted. I use flat brushes mostly. The only time I use angle brushes is when I need a point on the brush, which is usually only for window sash and tight detail cutting in. Laying off flat surfaces requires a light-handed, level, even stroke, which means you have to manipulate an angled brush too much to do so. Just my opinion.

net_tech 10-24-2011 01:09 PM

Another issue I am running in to is lighting. The room is 12x14 with 10ft ceiling. There are 2 windows in the room, but they don’t pass enough light to eliminate the ceiling entirely so when painting I am leaving bare spots. What would you recommend in that situation?
Thanks

jsheridan 10-24-2011 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by net_tech (Post 755710)
Another issue I am running in to is lighting. The room is 12x14 with 10ft ceiling. There are 2 windows in the room, but they donít pass enough light to eliminate the ceiling entirely so when painting I am leaving bare spots. What would you recommend in that situation?
Thanks

???????, Never mind. You mean "illuminate", it dawned on me just prior to submitting. Get a drop light. You might benefit from reading some articles I have on rolling ceilings, at the bottom link of my signature lines. I think you might have some technique issues as well. When I work with limited light, I increase my number of back and forths a bit to be on the safe side.

net_tech 10-24-2011 03:27 PM

of course I meant illuminate, sorry.

Yes Joe, I read all of your articles and realized I made a few mistakes. Will go back with a Ĺ inch roller the second time and roll as you explained in your posts.
What wattage work light would you use? The one I was using was not enough to light up the ceiling entirely, I constantly had to move the light.




jsheridan 10-24-2011 03:45 PM

Thanks. You can buy a cheap contractor's drop light at the big boxes for 10-15 bucks, which usually use 300-500 watt halogen bulb. Worth the price. Sometimes less light/no light is better to roll ceilings as it's hard to see where you're at. Sometimes low light highlights the difference between dry and wet color, where bright light washes the difference out. Try playing around with the light to see what best illuminates your area. It's better to have the light coming from an angle than from directly underneath.


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