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djonesax 06-13-2013 11:15 PM

Painting Plan
 
So I am painting tomorrow and I haven't painted in several years. I am a decent painter with tape :-) but this time I want to try to do it with out tape and and I want to spray the trim. I have watched some good videos and read some great advice on cutting in here on this forum. My question is about spraying the trim.

I owned a rental home once and used to spray quite a bit but I always masked off the walls when spraying trim. We just bought a foreclosure and we plan to paint everything but the ceilings. The carpet will be replaced as well. Also, where I am spraying there is no ceiling trim, only base, windows and doors.

My plan is to spray all the trim with semi-gloss and not mask the carpet or the walls since the carpet will be replaced and we intend to roll the walls.

I am concerned about the "flashing" on the walls from the semi and I am looking for advice.

The steps in my head now are...

1. Spray all the trim and doors with a 213 tip, allowing over-spray on the walls and carpet.
2. Sand wall over spray with 120 grit sand paper.
3. Cut in walls with a brush or pad edger.
4. Power roll walls.
5. Cut in again (second coat)
6. Power roll again (second coat)

Any advice?

David

chrisn 06-14-2013 02:53 AM

If it was me, I would skip the sprayer, pad edger and power roller. Till you get done cleaning up all those tools, you could paint a whole other room.

joecaption 06-14-2013 03:10 AM

I could not agree more.

Jmayspaint 06-14-2013 06:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djonesax
So I am painting tomorrow and I haven't painted in several years. I am a decent painter with tape :-) but this time I want to try to do it with out tape and and I want to spray the trim.

My plan is to spray all the trim with semi-gloss and not mask the carpet or the walls since the carpet will be replaced and we intend to roll the walls.

I am concerned about the "flashing" on the walls from the semi and I am looking for advice.

The steps in my head now are...

1. Spray all the trim and doors with a 213 tip, allowing over-spray on the walls and carpet.
2. Sand wall over spray with 120 grit sand paper.
3. Cut in walls with a brush or pad edger.
4. Power roll walls.
5. Cut in again (second coat)
6. Power roll again (second coat)

Any advice?

David





That sounds like a pretty good plan to me.
Be thorough with step #2 , scuffing the semi-gloss overspray well will help both flashing and coverage.
If you have a helper, it can be beneficial to have them hold up a big piece of cardboard on the wall next to the trim to 'shield ' the wall from overspray to an extent. Just cuts down on sanding, not generally necessary.
The only thing I might suggest changing is swap steps 3 an 4.
If I'm doing two coats on walls, it helps me to roll the first coat before cutting in and roll as close to trim and ceilings as I can. This reduces the amount of area you have to cut in the first time. And reduces coat overlap to an extent, promoting a more uniform finish.
I generally like to cut first on the final coat so you can roll over the brush strokes for the most part.
So maybe; 3-roll, 4-cut, 5-cut, 6-roll

Good luck!

princelake 06-14-2013 03:53 PM

ya i'd just cut and roll everything. if you have a helpers i'd roll the trim and doors with a regular paint roller and have a guy come in right in behind you with a brush to smooth it out. it'll only take 20min a door per coat. so figure in 1 hr per door the extra cigs and texting haha!
and you'd be surprised how dirty the ceiling get. if your going that far i'd paint the ceiling, it'll make it looks much better.

chrisn 06-14-2013 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jmayspaint (Post 1200884)
That sounds like a pretty good plan to me.
Be thorough with step #2 , scuffing the semi-gloss overspray well will help both flashing and coverage.
If you have a helper, it can be beneficial to have them hold up a big piece of cardboard on the wall next to the trim to 'shield ' the wall from overspray to an extent. Just cuts down on sanding, not generally necessary.
The only thing I might suggest changing is swap steps 3 an 4.
If I'm doing two coats on walls, it helps me to roll the first coat before cutting in and roll as close to trim and ceilings as I can. This reduces the amount of area you have to cut in the first time. And reduces coat overlap to an extent, promoting a more uniform finish.
I generally like to cut first on the final coat so you can roll over the brush strokes for the most part.
So maybe; 3-roll, 4-cut, 5-cut, 6-roll

Good luck!


Soooooo, you advocate the use of a power roller and paint pads:eek:???

Jmayspaint 06-14-2013 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn

Soooooo, you advocate the use of a power roller and paint pads:eek:???

Never used a pad myself, but DIYers seem to like um. Whatever works. Just don't flush the used pad down the toilet. ;)

djonesax 06-25-2013 06:25 PM

So I sprayed all the doors and trim on a couple hours. To ease my wifes concerns we papered off a few rooms but that got old quick and we skipped the other rooms. As adviced we sanded off the sheen on the over spray and the wall paint covered it with no issues at all. I was surprised at my cut in ability, in fact I dont think I will ever tape again other than the baseboards. For me it was easier to quickly tape off the baseboards than the to have to contort my self to see what I was painting.

I leaned something else watching a pro that was doing the tall walls. He used a 3" brush for cutting in. I was using a 2" and it was taking longer so I picked up a new 3" square brush at HD. Once I got used to it, I could fly through the cut-ins and could paint just as straight, if not straighter. My wife used an edging pad but I just brushed everything.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

ToolSeeker 06-26-2013 09:13 PM

Not trying to start an argument, But would someone please explain this god-awful amount of time referred to for cleaning spray equipment. As I sure must be doing it wrong.

Jmayspaint 06-27-2013 06:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker
Not trying to start an argument, But would someone please explain this god-awful amount of time referred to for cleaning spray equipment. As I sure must be doing it wrong.

To me it doesn't really take any more effort than washing a brush and roller set up.... Of course, you can just throw away brush and roller

ToolSeeker 06-27-2013 06:53 AM

The only thing I can think of is the old spray equip. like the buzz sprayers you had to disassemble to clean. I agree about the same as cleaning brush and roller.

djonesax 06-27-2013 08:08 AM

If I hook the pickup tube to a hose and spray water the clean up is fast but I typically just put the pickup and return tube into a clean toilet, set the sprayer to clean, then just keep flushing it until the water is clear. That may sound a little gross but it takes about the same amount of time as hooking it up to a hose.

David

ToolSeeker 06-28-2013 06:50 AM

And if you use the right equipment masking is a non-issue.

user1007 06-28-2013 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1208324)
And if you use the right equipment masking is a non-issue.

Try it in an antique home with persion rugs and high end furniture and tell me again that spraying is faster and that masking everything is a non-issue.

And remind me how well it works when cutting in color to color.

Spraying has its place. The last time my California home was painted it was sprayed and looked great but I was selling it. I have mentioned before I usually sub out spray work. No color changes. It was empty until I leased furniture on a short term basis to stage and sell it.

Wagner would have the consumer believe they can spray anything with a Harbor Freight handheld thing, or a cheap toy of their own making. It does not work that way.

My direct experience is in the fine and commercial art world and I would never trust just rinsing out $400 worth of airbrush on rare instances where I sprayed acrylic latex with just water. Even so I went through a fair number of needles and spray tips on a regular basis.

cdaniels 06-28-2013 11:57 AM

I agree that spraying has it's place but on occupied interiors I never spray, too much hassle for me but what works for me might not work for you.To each their own.


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