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-   -   painting over stained window frames (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/painting-over-stained-window-frames-64931/)

jerome8283 02-20-2010 10:35 AM

painting over stained window frames
 
I found this process online. Is this a good process to follow for painting over stained window frames??

Process:

First, LIGHTLY sand the trim with a fine grit sanding sponge (easier than sand paper) or 220 grit sand paper. You are not trying to remove the finish, just to dull the surface.

Second, remove dust with a shop vac, then wipe the trim down with a painters rag dampened with liquid sander/deglosser.

Third, putty nail holes (if not already puttied- this may or may not have been done originally). If you need help with puttiing, let me know. Use a paintable wood putty. Once the putty dries, sand the putty smooth with the surface of the trim. Remove dust with a shop-vac and a deglosser dampened painters rag.


Fourth, mask trim as needed, then prime with a sandable oil based interior primer. Allow to dry.

Fifth, sand the primer LIGHTLY with a fine grit sanding sponge or 220 grit sandpaper. Be careful that the primer is dry enough to sand (will generate a dust when sanding instead of gooey balls). DO NOT SAND THROUGH THE PRIMER! Be especially carefull to go lightly on edges, as you can go right through the primer very quickly. Remove dust with a shop-vac and a deglosser dampened painters rag.

Sixth, remove masking, then caulk cracks and joints. It is critical that this caulk be invisible when painted, so be sure to do it right. If you need help with "precision trim caulking", let me know. Use latex painters white caulk ( i prefer sherwin williams caulks... they apply better especially in small precision applications like caulking trim and cabinets). Caulk the edge of the trim to the wall if your wall is painted. You may need some of the wall paint to touch this up once the trim is completed. If you do not have the wall paint and are not repainting the wall, use extreme caution when applying the caulk so that when you paint the trim, you can cover the caulk with the trim paint... this means not getting the caulk too far out onto the wall. Allow to dry.

Seventh, remask as needed, then apply your first coat of high gloss oil paint. IMPORTANT: Be sure you use a quality brush (Purdy white or black china bristle is best... Sherwin Williams also has good brushes, as does Wooster). Rinse new brushes in paint thinner and shake or spin to remove excess thinner before use (be carefull, new brushes sometimes have a few loose bristles which can wind up in your finish!). DO NOT use the same brush you primed with!Alot of painters like to use a 2 1/2 inch sash brush on trim (easiest to use), some prefer a 3" square brush. If you want to help eliminate brush marks, you can add Penetrol, a oil paint additive that aids in the smoothing of the film once applied (just follow the directions on the can).

Eighth, IF YOU NEED ANOTHER COAT: Once the paint is completely dry (about 2 days), VERY lightly sand and wipe with sander/deglosser again. Recoat.

user1007 02-20-2010 12:47 PM

Where are you located please click on your username and update your basic location.

You should be advising people to apply a primer before painting.

jerome8283 02-20-2010 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 403214)
Where are you located please click on your username and update your basic location.

You should be advising people to apply a primer before painting.


I'm in New York. I'm not suggesting these steps but rather asking if they are ok.

----- Fourth, mask trim as needed, then prime with a sandable oil based interior primer. Allow to dry.

housepaintingny 02-20-2010 06:12 PM

If it was me I would sand the trim with a medium grit sanding sponge, clean the trim with tsp, rinse it well, apply a bonding primer ( the key word is BONDING primer) caulk if needed, fill nail holes then apply two coats of a 100% acrylic latex paint.

jerome8283 02-21-2010 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by housepaintingny (Post 403302)
If it was me I would sand the trim with a medium grit sanding sponge, clean the trim with tsp, rinse it well, apply a bonding primer ( the key word is BONDING primer) caulk if needed, fill nail holes then apply two coats of a 100% acrylic latex paint.


Thanks!

Windows 02-22-2010 03:21 AM

I agree that acrylic latex is the way to go. Even for the primer. The original steps were probably suggested by an old-timer. In many places, you can't even buy oil paint anymore.

jerome8283 02-22-2010 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows (Post 403966)
I agree that acrylic latex is the way to go. Even for the primer. The original steps were probably suggested by an old-timer. In many places, you can't even buy oil paint anymore.

I went to SW yesterday and was told to use their White Pigmented Shellac Primer. I was told this would prevent the stain from coming through the paint. For paint they suggested the ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex.

Windows 02-22-2010 12:22 PM

Shellac will definitely seal in the stain. Bleed through can be an issue particularly if you are going to a light colored paint. I prefer to use latex primer even though it is less effective just because I don't like the 'exotic' fumes of the various solvents.

jerome8283 02-22-2010 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows (Post 404119)
Shellac will definitely seal in the stain. Bleed through can be an issue particularly if you are going to a light colored paint. I prefer to use latex primer even though it is less effective just because I don't like the 'exotic' fumes of the various solvents.

Good point regarding "'exotic' fumes". My wife gave me a hard time because we have an 10month old and expressed concern about the fumes. Is there a "green" product available in a primer? Is there a latex primer which most effective? What do you think about Kilz products?

I was thinking of taking back the ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex to get the Duration Home Interior Acrylic Latex.

wacha 02-22-2010 03:08 PM

Both Bin and Kilz have oil base primers that are somewhat odorless. You do not have to go with a shellac. Good luck

Windows 02-22-2010 03:44 PM

Widows can be tough to paint, and oil can make it tougher. If it were me, I would use an oil primer only if the varnish (clear coat) was in terrible shape on the windows and I was painting them a light color. If the varnish was still good or I was going dark, I would use a latex primer.

Test one window with latex primer and see how it goes. In places where it bleeds through try priming it again (spot priming) it with the latex primer.
If that doesn't work, you may be stuck using the oil or the shellac.

jerome8283 02-22-2010 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows (Post 404256)
Widows can be tough to paint, and oil can make it tougher. If it were me, I would use an oil primer only if the varnish (clear coat) was in terrible shape on the windows and I was painting them a light color. If the varnish was still good or I was going dark, I would use a latex primer.

Test one window with latex primer and see how it goes. In places where it bleeds through try priming it again (spot priming) it with the latex primer.
If that doesn't work, you may be stuck using the oil or the shellac.

Thanks. There doesn't appear to be a varnish applied. It looks as if it were stained without a clear coat varnish. I'll be painting the window trim white.

drtbk4ever 02-22-2010 05:05 PM

I'd love for you to share your experiences and some photos. We have a couple of windows we may be painting as well.

PaintinNC 02-22-2010 07:09 PM

I would say use SW Problock Latex or Bonding Primer, no need to use Shellac. If you were going to use a solvent based product you could do better, just regular Problock oil would work too. Proclassic is better in these situations than Duration home because it resists "sticking" better, IE you don't want to have a hard time opening and closing the window because the paint wont allow it. PREP is the most important part, the finish won't look good unless the primer has been sanded well before application.


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