DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   Painting over High Gloss - Ran into some issues.. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/painting-over-high-gloss-ran-into-some-issues-72747/)

t60 06-03-2010 04:46 PM

Painting over High Gloss - Ran into some issues..
 
Hi Everyone,

My house is stucco and wood -- not sure what kind of wood, but I know that it's painted with a high gloss oil based paint. The stucco was painted similarly.

I was ignorant and didn't do any research prior to painting, so everything is a bit screwed up :(

I went to Home Depot and picked up "2 in 1 primer and paint" and just went at it (after spraying the dirt off the house and letting it dry). Everything looked fine, until the next morning. I noticed some of the paint was cracking and ran my fingernail over it -- the paint just fell off! This was after 6 hours in the sun and leaving it overnight. (It's a week later now and the paint is still peeling..)

Obviously I screwed up pretty badly. Half my house is poorly painted over on top of high gloss paint. One of my neighbors has had paint on his house for the past eight years and still looks brand new (so I trust him) -- he said I could just slap on 2-3 coats of primer on top of everything and that will alleviate the issues. I'm worried that even with 2-3 coats of primer, the paint will peel anyway.

In an ideal world I would just scrape off all of the paint, degloss/sand and start over, but I don't have that much time to spend unfortunately. I'm wondering what everyone thinks about putting 2-3 coats of primer? Will it stick enough to the walls?

hennyh 06-03-2010 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t60 (Post 450765)
In an ideal world I would just scrape off all of the paint, degloss/sand and start over, but I don't have that much time to spend unfortunately. I'm wondering what everyone thinks about putting 2-3 coats of primer? Will it stick enough to the walls?

If you don't have the time then hire a professional painter to do it for you.

2-3 coats over gloss oil won't stick any better then your failed coat.

Do it the right way and sand or strip it down to a good substrate, prime with the correct primer and then topcoat. (old substrate, primer and topcoat all have to be compatable)

I would shop at a real paint store where they can give you professional products and advice vs. Home Crapo.

chrisn 06-04-2010 05:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t60 (Post 450765)
Hi Everyone,

My house is stucco and wood -- not sure what kind of wood, but I know that it's painted with a high gloss oil based paint. The stucco was painted similarly.

I was ignorant and didn't do any research prior to painting, so everything is a bit screwed up :(

I went to Home Depot and picked up "2 in 1 primer and paint" and just went at it (after spraying the dirt off the house and letting it dry). Everything looked fine, until the next morning. I noticed some of the paint was cracking and ran my fingernail over it -- the paint just fell off! This was after 6 hours in the sun and leaving it overnight. (It's a week later now and the paint is still peeling..)

Obviously I screwed up pretty badly. Half my house is poorly painted over on top of high gloss paint. One of my neighbors has had paint on his house for the past eight years and still looks brand new (so I trust him) -- he said I could just slap on 2-3 coats of primer on top of everything and that will alleviate the issues:eek::eek:. I'm worried that even with 2-3 coats of primer, the paint will peel anyway.

In an ideal world I would just scrape off all of the paint, degloss/sand and start over:thumbsup:, but I don't have that much time to spend unfortunately. I'm wondering what everyone thinks about putting 2-3 coats of primer? Will it stick enough to the walls?


That is some of the worse advise I have ever heard:yes:
If you want the job done properly then that is just what you need to do with one(1) coat of slow dry oil primer and two coats of 100% acrylic latex on top with gloss of satin on the stucco and maybe semi gloss on the trim. There is no reason for a full gloss anywhere.:no:

gdoucette 06-04-2010 01:51 PM

If you used a latex primer over an oil-based paint ... they aren't compatible. An oil-based primer over oil-based paint can then be painted with latex if that's your end goal.

Have to agree with henny though ... best finish would come after stripping the old paint off completely.

t60 06-04-2010 07:28 PM

Thanks, looks like I'll be stripping paint this weekend, whether or not I like it :)

I figure an extra weekend won't kill me, as long as it saves me time in the long run, and since I'm here I want to do a good job on it.

Anyone have tips on removing this layer of paint? Will any ordinary paint thinner work? It comes off fairly easily, but I just don't want to scrape it all by hand if I don't have to.. (obviously even with paint thinner I will have to scrape off anything remaining)

housepaintingny 06-05-2010 12:13 AM

If stripping paint you basically have three choices, strip it mechanically using a paint shaver, you may be able to rent one, other wise they cost about $700, use a chemical stripper such as peel away, or use heat, All of these methods have positive and negative sides, personally I would scrape all of the loose paint off, sand every board with an orbit sander with 40 grit paper and feather sand all of the spots where loose paint came off,this would be the fastest method, even if you used a paint shaver you would still have to orbit sand after words and if you chemically stripped your still going to be scraping and sanding to some degree and using heat is very time consuming and still involves scraping and sanding to a degree.

chrisn 06-05-2010 04:48 AM

Paint thinner will NOT work:no:

bobtheblindguy 06-05-2010 05:43 PM

T60 looks like you really have your work cut out for you. If it were me I would be looking for a less labor intensive way to remove the paint but don't think there is. There is only one thing I might add and maybe the paint expect here could comfirm or not if it should be done, after he strips the paint should he caulk or try to seal any cracks where moisture can get in ?

housepaintingny 06-05-2010 05:49 PM

Yes, you should caulk around window and door trim, all corners and any place siding meets trim, including soffit and fascia as needed, but I would not caulk until after all of the prep work is done and after the substrate is primed, the primer will give the caulk something to adhere to better.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:39 PM.