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Leanne1 02-04-2012 09:42 AM

Painting new drywall
 
I'm painting our newly drywalled basement and looking for a recommendation on a primer that would work well. I want to get a quality product, but i don't want to overpay for something if a cheaper one will do the job just as well. I was planning on just one coat of primer, but others have told me i should do two. ??? Also, any advice on roller vs. spray? thanks in advance for your help; I have always come away happy with the answers I get from this site!

user1007 02-04-2012 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leanne1 (Post 843860)
I'm painting our newly drywalled basement and looking for a recommendation on a primer that would work well. I want to get a quality product, but i don't want to overpay for something if a cheaper one will do the job just as well. I was planning on just one coat of primer, but others have told me i should do two. ??? Also, any advice on roller vs. spray? thanks in advance for your help; I have always come away happy with the answers I get from this site!

One coat of a good drywall primer/sealer is all you need over clean and dust free drywall is all you need. Then two coats of finish. You are planning to buy from a paint and not a box store right?

I like Benjamin Moore products but Sherwin Williams works for me. People on this site like Zinser primer products and I must say they are nice to work with and I think a tad less expensive than Ben Moore for primers. Think of your primer as the key to holding your finish to the wall. You do not want to skimp on it.

I would visit your REAL paint store and see what deals are being cut today on nice primers. What you don't want is crap like Kilz (but for rattle cans in a pinch), BEHRly primer or paint, Valspar, etc. You definitely will not fall for nonsense like primer and paint in one right?

Ironlight 02-04-2012 10:01 AM

I'm partial to Zinnser Primecoat 2 that you can pick up at Home Depot. It's good and while it's not cheap it's not as expensive as some others.

Don't bother with spraying unless a) you have a large area to do b) you're willing to pay for the respirator and coveralls you'll need c) you're willing to shell out for a good sprayer, or to rent one and d) you're willing to go back and fix up the mistakes, such as runs and missed areas, that invariably result when using a sprayer for the very first time.

One coat of primer is adequate for it's purpose, which is to seal the drywall and create a good surface for the paint. Any recommendation for a second coat of primer is usually based on the notion that primer is cheaper than paint and that two coats of it may allow you to get away with one coat of paint. Two coats of paint always provide the superior result so if it were me I would not bother with the second coat of primer.

For using a roller, check out some of the video tutorials on YouTube (search on "paint roller") as there is a right way and wrong way to roll and the right way gives you a nice even wall without roller edge marks. There are a lot of bozos on YouTube so click through a few until you find one from an articulate professional painter. There are quite a few. Ten minutes watching videos on YouTube will save you 6x that time when you get down to doing the work.

Leanne1 02-04-2012 10:12 AM

THank you for the advice! @sdsester, I bought the Cashmere paint at Sherwin Williams already. I know better than the primer and paint in one, but i must admit that prior to discovering this site I used Behr/kilz almost exclusively in our old house (gasp, i know now).

It is a huge area, but I think rolling will be the best way...i never thougght about the protective gear. I'll check out the Primecoat 2, thanks @ironlight! :)

Ironlight 02-04-2012 10:17 AM

Here's a good video, I like this guy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I543...eature=related

joecaption 02-04-2012 10:46 AM

Use an 18" roller and it will go faster.

chrisn 02-04-2012 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight (Post 843908)
Here's a good video, I like this guy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I543...eature=related

That guy did not have a speck of paint on himself or his clothes:whistling2:

housepaintingny 02-04-2012 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leanne1 (Post 843899)
THank you for the advice! @sdsester, I bought the Cashmere paint at Sherwin Williams already. I know better than the primer and paint in one, but i must admit that prior to discovering this site I used Behr/kilz almost exclusively in our old house (gasp, i know now).

It is a huge area, but I think rolling will be the best way...i never thougght about the protective gear. I'll check out the Primecoat 2, thanks @ironlight! :)

SW Cashmere is a good paint and looks great too.
You will need one coat of primer and two coats of paint.
I would prime with SW Preprite, Promar primer. Its a good primer at a good retail cost. There are a lot of good primers on the market and everyone will have there preference. I would not recommend kiltz primer.
I don't recommend spraying unless you've done it before and the room is empty with no finished floor. With spraying you will have some masking to do and you still need to back roll the primer and paint as its being sprayed. Its not as easy as 1,2,3 I'm done. I would brush and roll the walls. There is a time and place for spraying and usually a residential repaint or small residential addition is not worth spraying.

user1007 02-04-2012 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight (Post 843908)
Here's a good video, I like this guy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I543...eature=related

Basically alright but I always rolled, wet to dry in a "W" not straight up and down.

ltd 02-04-2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 843962)
That guy did not have a speck of paint on himself or his clothes:whistling2:

did you notice what paint he was rolling:(

jsheridan 02-04-2012 07:07 PM

I've never seen a painter dutch roll, horizontal, as a matter of course on rolling a standard wall. Watching him looked uncomfortable because I roll right to left.
One thing I noticed is that he bends over too much. He doesn't have his pole extended enough to avoid bending, and he bends over to slide his tray, which I do standing with my foot. The less you bend, the less you stress your back. Use the tools. He kneels down once to cut in the base and then kneels again to dutch roll the base. Twice the work on his knees for something unnecessary.
Also, to increase productivity, when you go up the ladder to cut in in the corner, do the cut on both walls, the wall you are going to roll and as far you can reach along the adjacent wall. You'll climb the ladder four less times per room.
I also don't think it's good advice to teach HO's to dutch roll the top and bottom because now they have all that wet edge to worry about, more than I even, as a pro, would be comfortable with given todays quick setting finishes.

housepaintingny 02-04-2012 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 844361)
I've never seen a painter dutch roll, horizontal, as a matter of course on rolling a standard wall. Watching him looked uncomfortable because I roll right to left.
One thing I noticed is that he bends over too much. He doesn't have his pole extended enough to avoid bending, and he bends over to slide his tray, which I do standing with my foot. The less you bend, the less you stress your back. Use the tools. He kneels down once to cut in the base and then kneels again to dutch roll the base. Twice the work on his knees for something unnecessary.
Also, to increase productivity, when you go up the ladder to cut in in the corner, do the cut on both walls, the wall you are going to roll and as far you can reach along the adjacent wall. You'll climb the ladder four less times per room.
I also don't think it's good advice to teach HO's to dutch roll the top and bottom because now they have all that wet edge to worry about, more than I even, as a pro, would be comfortable with given todays quick setting finishes.

I agree. I saw the video and really didn't see anything professional about his painting technique, except for the drops on the floor. Drops are always a plus.
I don't agree with him rolling along the length of the baseboard and along the length of the ceiling and if he used the 2-4' pole that he had the right way he would be more efficient and not bending as much.

chrisn 02-05-2012 05:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ltd (Post 844333)
did you notice what paint he was rolling:(

I did not want to stir up the hornets nest with that:laughing:


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