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Abhi 01-19-2011 07:27 PM

Painting kitchen walls
 
Hi folks,
I would like to get some recommendations on painting my kitchen walls.
1. I don't want to sand the walls, what is the best stuff to use for cleaning kitchen walls that have grease and dirt on them?
2. As far as the paint, I'm planning to use the BEHR paint and primer in one. Any reviews on how it performs?
Thanks in advance.

DangerMouse 01-19-2011 07:51 PM

Tri Sodium Phosphate (TSP) for cleaning prior to painting.
As to how the folks here feel about behr paint, please use the search feature and read away!

DM

chrisn 01-20-2011 06:23 AM

2 Attachment(s)
TSP works well but needs to be rinsed WELL.
This works just as well

DangerMouse 01-20-2011 06:41 AM

How well does dirtex work with REAL greasy cabinets, etc.? Doesn't IT need to be rinsed well too?
I imagine any cleaner cleaning grease would need to be. Probably need to redo it a couple of times too to be sure all the grease is gone.
I have a cabinet that could stand some cleaning.... it was given to me used, but unfinished! :eek: I wonder if ANYthing will clean the grease from that??? I'm thinking of removing the door, doing a 'sunburst' effect like I did before, and sanding down the framework. Not sure if even THAT will allow painting/staining though, as bad as this thing is. The sunburst re-skins the whole door, so no grease to worry about.
If I can't get it acceptable looking, it'll be in the shop for tool storage.... :laughing: But the wife wants it in the new kitchen.

DM

DrHicks 01-20-2011 09:00 AM

Like these guys have already stated, TSP works well for cleaning and painting prep.

Depending on how dirty and stained the walls are, you might want to use Zinzer Primer (or another decent primer) first.

As for Behr Ultra Premium... Well, you'll get a lot of hate mail for even mentioning that one. I've not used the interior paint, just exterior. However, my brother-in-law painted the entire interior of his business with it, and loved it.

Faron79 01-20-2011 10:07 AM

Simple-Green is good at de-greasing....BUT like most cleaners, needs to be rinsed well.
POWDERED Dirtex, as the the esteemed ChrisN pictured, works very good as a pre-painting cleaner. AND, 98% of the time, DOESN'T need to be rinsed...unlike TSP.
Use TSP if you'd like, it's a great cleaner...just do 2 or 3 good rinses. Any TSP haze left dried on a surface will screw up even the best of primers, etc. So don't work too far ahead of what you can get rinsed in a couple minutes.

If youir walls are a Semi-gloss...sorry...sand them:yes:!! AFTER cleaning, then prime. THEN paint.
Sorry...the paint&primerinone concept is fair at best:jester:.

>>> How does the "primer" in the can know how to get to the wall FIRST...and let the "paint" develop on top:huh:?!??!

Faron

ccarlisle 01-20-2011 03:00 PM

Anytime you clean an oil or a grease using an alkaline cleaner such as Dirtex, TSP or any liquid cleaner such as SprayNine, even PineSol, you create a chemical reaction between the grease and the alkaline component of the cleaner - and the result is a soap. Real soap!

Soaps interfere with the surface tension of the surface you are about to paint and therefore the strong recommendations to rinse these surfaces real well, to remove the soaps before you paint.

Now some products are stronger than others; TSP is chemicaly stronger than Dirtex, so you either need more Dirtex to remove a given amount of grease - or it doesn't remove it as well. Liquid cleaners are more convenient and may contain solvents that dissoolve the grease - but still need to be well rinsed!

So there is no product that doesn't need rinsing.

BTW: "Dirtex" contains the most bitter substance known to man, to prevent anyone from tasting Dirtex - as the raw material tasts fairly mild. I know all about that bitter product, we used to make it. No fun!:no:

chrisn 01-20-2011 05:12 PM

BTW: "Dirtex" contains the most bitter substance known to man, to prevent anyone from tasting Dirtex

Why oh why would anyone be tasting it??:huh::huh::huh::laughing:

Faron79 01-21-2011 12:58 AM

Welllllll.....ahem....Dirtex powder, when it's mixed up, does kinda look like Mello-Yellow. Just sayin':sick:......

But seriously!
Just took out my powdered Dirtex box...
* On the front: For walls, floors, woodwork.
* Leaves surface clean without rinsing.
* Excellent preparation for repainting or rewaxing.
* No streaking.
You can make a strong or weak solution, but the suggested rate is 2 tablespoons per gallon of warm water.
Box also mentions it's fine for bathroom use, appliances, counters, cabinets, etc....but to use as mild a solution as possible.

On the side of the box:
> For heavy-duty laundry cleaning....add 1/4 cup Dirtex per load to regular detergent.
> Dirtex improves the action of many laundry cleaners when heavy-duty cleaning jobs are encountered.
> To clean greasy pots, pans, broilers, & BBQ equipment:
Use 1/4 or more in hot water and soak for 10 minutes. Grease & cooked-on deposits will soak off or be ready to scrub off with scouring pad.
CAUTION: Contains Sodium Sesquicarbonate and Sodium Meta-Silicate. Avoid contact with eyes, and prolonged contact with skin.
(sounds like a Rock-band name!)

NOTE:
>>>> The liquid trigger-bottle form of Dirtex...says NOT to use for pre-paint cleaning!!! It's different stuff than the powdered version.

SOME of CCarlisle points are correct...some aren't.
Soap "isn't created" when cleaning. The product ACTS like a soap though when cleaning contaminants.

Faron

ccarlisle 01-21-2011 06:51 AM

Faron: A "soap" is what we call the neutralised product of the chemical reaction of a fatty acid and a base; greases and most dirts are fatty acids and take any base you want, but a soap is what you'll get.

Tell me my chemistry is faulty..."go ahead make my day!" :laughing:

chrisn 01-22-2011 04:48 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Tell me my chemistry is faulty..."go ahead make my day!" :laughing:

Faron79 01-22-2011 06:12 PM

Chrisn-
Are you losing your hair?!?!:whistling2:

CC-
Yeah, mostly my bad...
I was thinking pretty broadly in my "soap"-slinging!
Although, in a sense, even CC's chemical definition is sorta broad. There's so many "soaps".

Faron

chrisn 01-22-2011 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Faron79 (Post 575787)
Chrisn-
Are you losing your hair?!?!:whistling2:

CC-
Yeah, mostly my bad...
I was thinking pretty broadly in my "soap"-slinging!
Although, in a sense, even CC's chemical definition is sorta broad. There's so many "soaps".

Faron


Naw, I am loosing some but at my age it is mostly still there and still brown:laughing:

ccarlisle 01-23-2011 08:25 AM

Well, Faron, in as far as 'soaps' go, I may have an unfair advantage over most, a knowledge that comes from years of study and more years of research, production, marketing for others as well as for my own, so I think 'I know whereof I speak', as the saying goes. In then end, I owned a production plant with 10 employees, making pretty well anything - but most personal care products - and as you probably know, detergency is one of that industry's main focuses.

Like the name 'Kleenex' - the word soap has become almost generic although there is only one true soap on the market today. Just don't find it anymore; but you do of course products that 'clean' - and people think 'soap' when they think 'clean', so the term stuck.

I read your posts with great interest. There are few IMO who I can say that about on this bb.

chrisn 01-23-2011 05:57 PM

I read your posts with great interest. There are few IMO who I can say that about on this bb.

Not even me?:cry:


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