Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-04-2012, 06:20 AM   #16
US ARMY RETIRED
 
ACR_SCOUT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 100
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker View Post
One problem may be the light mud. The lighter the mud the less glue it has in it that may be why you had a problem with it sticking. Your first 2 coats should be all purpose (bright green lid) at the least, then the light or ultra lite for top coat because less glue, easier to sand.
If your going to get another knife get a 12".
I guess I should have been a bit clearer. My first hack at this was the green lid stuff. I found it hard to work with, seemed to dry too fast or I was working it too much and much of it fell off. Then I primed and switch to blue lid hoping it was easier.

I really appreciate everyone's input. This is so educational.

Last night the wife made a motivating comment. She said it looks like you are getting somewhere. There is finally more mud on the walls than was on me.

ACR_SCOUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:02 AM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 3,065
Rewards Points: 2,330
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
A wider knife will really help. And don't be afraid to goop the mud on and then scrape it off.
The trick is to use a wider knife than you think you need, then load a big gob of mud only in the center of the knife. If you fill the knife, then mud will squeeze out and fall on the floor toward the edges of your knife. e.g. use a 6" knife, and put 3" width of mud on it, or a 12" knife and 8" width of mud on it.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:06 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,642
Rewards Points: 2,320
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ACR_SCOUT View Post
I guess I should have been a bit clearer. My first hack at this was the green lid stuff. I found it hard to work with, seemed to dry too fast or I was working it too much and much of it fell off. Then I primed and switch to blue lid hoping it was easier.

I really appreciate everyone's input. This is so educational.

Last night the wife made a motivating comment. She said it looks like you are getting somewhere. There is finally more mud on the walls than was on me.
Good wife comments like that make it worthwhile. If you ever use the green lid again remember to loosen it up with about a quart of water to a 5 gallon bucket that should do away with your problems. If it would help any the box stores sell a book on drywall I think the name is real fancy it's DRYWALL by Myron Ferguson it's really pretty good and kinda aimed at the DIY. Good Luck and let know how its going.
ToolSeeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:29 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 3,065
Rewards Points: 2,330
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew LB View Post
Oh yeah. And once everything is dried and sanded, YOU MUST PROPERLY PRIME drywall.
Sort of true and sort of not true. When using flat paint especially, there won't be any flashing, and if using a good quality paint, there won't be any hiding or coverage issues either. In other words, sometimes paint is its own "primer". Or to put it another way, the "priming" coat really depends on what you need to accomplish, and sometimes the paint itself accomplishes it.

The paint manufacturers themselves understand this, and this is the reason they have started labeling some of their paint as "paint and primer in one", even though nothing has changed in the formula. As seen here

http://sherwin.scene7.com/is/image/s...w/SGCS02100013

Which is to say, they have not really added "primer" to the paint, but they realize what a primer is supposed to do when going over drywall, and the paint does it. So is it a primer or is it not? You can answer that for yourself, but a separate product isn't always required.

The paints are warranted for this type of use. For example, http://www.sherwin-williams.com/docu.../035777036914/

Or
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/f...H#advs=0&tab=2

And click the TDS sheet.

It's not until you get into the eggshell finishes that flashing becomes an issue, and even then 2 coats of the paint can solve that. Even if 3 coats are required to reduce all issues, it still might be more economical to use 3 coats of paint rather than 1 coat of primer and 2 coats of paint. If you doubt this, just ask and I'll show you the math.

There are times to use a real primer, but painting over new drywall is not necessarily one of them.

Last edited by jeffnc; 12-04-2012 at 07:33 AM.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 08:13 AM   #20
US ARMY RETIRED
 
ACR_SCOUT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 100
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


And the wife keeps reminding me that it is just a garage. I think she wants it done so I can start building her the built in buffet she wants.
ACR_SCOUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 10:40 AM   #21
US ARMY RETIRED
 
ACR_SCOUT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 100
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


First, for all those that suggested a bigger knife, thank you very much. To be that suggestion made no sense if the 6" knife was kicking my tail.

For the novice and new guys, get a bigger knife! It has made the world of difference. I bought a 10" knife and using a 12" trough for the mud. After I thinned the mud a little the wider knife made the mud go on a smooth as a baby's bottom.

I am so excited about it I am sitting here sending this for others to see while I wait for the mud to dry. What took 2 days to do on the other half of the garage only took an hour and forty-five minutes on the second half.

Getting the techniques down is a challenge but I was coming along quickly.

Thanks to everyone.
ACR_SCOUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 02:56 PM   #22
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ACR_SCOUT View Post
First, for all those that suggested a bigger knife, thank you very much.

For the novice and new guys, get a bigger knife!

I am so excited about it I am sitting here sending this for others to see while I wait for the mud to dry. What took 2 days to do on the other half of the garage only took an hour and forty-five minutes on the second half.

Getting the techniques down is a challenge but I was coming along quickly.

Thanks to everyone.
You are welcome.

It is just about the right tool for the job. DIYers tend to try to match the tool to the size of what they see. I can paint, for example most 1" spaces or even the edge of trim with 2.5" angled sash brush faster than with a 1" brush. In fact, in all the years, I have probably bought 4 1" brushes. You cannot roll on paint without a capable nap roller cover.

A wide knife, even for minor patches saves sanding. I see people going after even picture frame holes with tiny knives and cans of what I know as spackle (over priced foam stuff) and I cringe.

As for saving time with your wider knife? Of course. You used less material and had to do much less sending. But you sound like the experience of working with the right knife/tool was positive too? Wow!

Just remember, if you ever have to tape something, that 6" knife is still the tool of choice.

Now, take care of them. Clean the knife and then pan. Spray with something like WD-40 and then wipe with a cloth. Good to go next time you need them.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 03:09 PM   #23
US ARMY RETIRED
 
ACR_SCOUT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 100
Rewards Points: 75
Thumbs up

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Now, take care of them. Clean the knife and then pan. Spray with something like WD-40 and then wipe with a cloth. Good to go next time you need them.
Yes, my granddad was very direct with me one day as a very young kid. He had me clean some cement working tools. I washed them and just threw them in this wooden bin he stored them in. At the time I thought he was really mad at me when he told me about wiping down the tools with 3-n-1 oil after cleaning them. Now, much later in life, I know it was just a good ole granddad passing down good advise.

I have wiped down my tools with oils for some time now except the table saw top, that gets scrubbed with mineral oil occasionally and a buff with floor wax but that is another topic all together.

Still I am glad you said something here about oiling the tools it because it is such wonderful advise.
ACR_SCOUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 04:38 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 3,065
Rewards Points: 2,330
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew LB View Post
My Makita impact driver works great and makes quick work of big jobs.
I'm having a hard time figuring why you'd need an impact driver for drywall screws. They're going 3/4" into pine lumber. If not a dedicated drywall screw gun, then a regular driver drill with a drywall bit in it.

And for someone using a 14" knife, your seams look awfully narrow
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 08:53 PM   #25
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
I'm having a hard time figuring why you'd need an impact driver for drywall screws. They're going 3/4" into pine lumber. If not a dedicated drywall screw gun, then a regular driver drill with a drywall bit in it.

And for someone using a 14" knife, your seams look awfully narrow
If I misread the posts and comments, the guy was not talking about his first pass at taping the seam but skim coating after.

My work was on old antique homes with hardy lumber. I don't think I ever suggested you need an impact driver to put a fastener 3/4" into even new wood?

Sadly, many homeowners own but one wimpy battery for many tools. And one charging site. Come on, a kit with saw, drill, light, foot and hand warmer, wifi capability, and phone access goes for like $200 bucks for a Christmas special? Cheap Chinese drill bits and a saw blade most would never use because of the drag?

I have seen DIYers try to run a dull as sin drill bit, or warped and clearly gone blade on a saw wondering if an impact drill or impact saw would cut faster.

Get a new battery people.

And even then, does anybody remember the difference in sound when you cranked up an electric saw vs. one with a maybe battery charged? We've all managed to lock a saw up cutting something but which would we still prefer to back us out? 12v, 18v, 12v ion with no charge. 110v?
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 09:02 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 3,065
Rewards Points: 2,330
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
I don't think I ever suggested you need an impact driver to put a fastener 3/4" into even new wood?
What are you talking about? You can see I was replying to Andrew.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 09:18 PM   #27
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
What are you talking about? You can see I was replying to Andrew.
Sorry. I guess I did not. I find this forum public.

Thought private mail was for such hookups? I wish you both well.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 09:31 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 3,065
Rewards Points: 2,330
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Sorry. I guess I did not. I find this forum public.

Thought private mail was for such hookups? I wish you both well.
What on earth are you talking about? Just look at the post. It shows who I quoted. You are one of the strangest people on this forum ever.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 09:33 PM   #29
US ARMY RETIRED
 
ACR_SCOUT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 100
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post

What on earth are you talking about? Just look at the post. It shows who I quoted. You are one of the strangest people on this forum ever.
Now that's some funny stuff right there, I don't care who you are.
ACR_SCOUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 07:18 AM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 3,642
Rewards Points: 2,320
Default

Painting the interior of a garage.


An impact driver is really not a very good tool for drywall it tends to set the screws too deep and then they lose their holding power. It is best to use a drill/driver, with a clutch you can set, so you don't set them to deep or for about $5 you can get a "dimpler" at the big box store and it will allow you set the screws at the right depth.

ToolSeeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wiring Garage Sconces paredown Electrical 1 03-28-2012 03:08 PM
Painting rusting garage door Richo Painting 2 08-10-2008 01:51 AM
Painting a garage door dfoxworthy Painting 6 06-22-2008 10:51 PM
Painting inside of garage door PUNISHER VETTE Painting 10 07-10-2007 11:06 PM
Painting OSB in the garage. timg Painting 2 05-01-2007 10:50 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.