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Startingover 09-14-2013 12:00 PM

painting garage floor
 
I have a 2 car garage and 1 car.

The other half of the garage is used for a table, where I unload my groceries, a chair, and a drying rack for clothes. I want to make the floor for my work area nicer. I looked at mats for garages and for different reasons one being that I walk down the middle and don't want a mat to create an uneven area to walk.

That leaves painting the area that's my work space. The garage is 30 years old and while the floor is in decent shape, it's discolored and I wouldn't be surprised if there were old oil spills.

Would a coat of Gardz on my work area seal everything so I could paint this section? Then I suppose I'd use a concrete paint over the Gardz.

thanks for any advice.

Gymschu 09-14-2013 12:31 PM

S.O. I would not recommend Guardz for concrete. Usually with concrete if you can degrease the surface and pressure wash off any contaminants, you are good to go with a Porch and Floor Latex Enamel, 2 coats. Or, if this is bare concrete that has never been coated, you might consider a concrete stain. The paint will make it much easier to clean up dirt, debris, and spills........the stain is easier to apply. It depends on your preferences and IF the floor has been coated before.

If this is a case where the floor is already painted, your best option is finding out what was used before and use the same coating.

jeffnc 09-14-2013 12:38 PM

Use a concrete primer, not Gardz. Concrete is an alkaline material and the primer or paint will take that into account.

If you prime it with a concrete primer, you should then be able to use the paint of your choice. You won't need a concrete paint per se because you're not painting concrete - you're painting primer. Of course a concrete paint would still be fine.

If you skip the primer, then make sure you're using a paint made specifically for coating concrete.

Having said that, epoxy is really the way to go if you want a truly nice, long lasting coating.

Startingover 09-14-2013 12:50 PM

Thanks.

I just can't tell if anything was applied in the past. My guess is Yes as there's just the slightest bit of dingy sheen and it's not as rough as the concrete on my drive or sidewalks.

Matthewt1970 09-14-2013 10:36 PM

If you plan on driving a car on the surface you need at a bare minimum a 2-part epoxy paint or it will just peel up in no time. The "dingy sheen" you see on there now is more than likely a sealer they put on the concrete when it was new. Even more reason you need an epoxy paint.

Startingover 09-15-2013 07:36 AM

I'm certain there's a coat of something. Maybe the sealer you mentioned. I knelt down and felt it and didn't feel bare concrete, but something smooth. Altho, it's badly discolored in areas. I also see big round, dark marks like the old owners used a scrubbing machine on it.

Will wait for the next big SW sale.

This is my first garage and I love it! Wish I had money to put storage cabinets in. There are shelves lining both sides, so everything out in the open gives it a cluttered look.

On the wall directly in front, as you drive in, I hung 6 pictures and will paint it green soon as I'm caught up with other painting.

After painting for over 6 months (including chipping off wallpaper), when I moved, in I took a break from painting. Now that the grass is slowing down I'm back to painting. One last bathroom to remove paper, trim in half the house, 5 doors, a laundry room and I'm done.

If the epoxy paint looks good on my work area side I may do the entire garage floor. Maybe I should just go ahead and do it all now anyway. The only area that's messy is the corner where I wheel in and leave the lawnmower. There's always dirt and clumps of grass there.

jeffnc 09-15-2013 07:57 AM

There are a couple ways to prepare the concrete. One is acid etching. The second is a mechanical grinder that you can rent for floors.

Also, they make "epoxy paint", and I'm not exactly sure what that is, but make sure you get a true 2-part epoxy like matthew mentioned. I know I said simply epoxy, but I just assume people know that means 2-part epoxy. That stuff is tough. It can also be coated with a polyurethane for a bit of sheen and easier cleaning. I have purchased from this company and am very happy with the results and their choices and how they present the information.
http://www.adpolymers.com/

Jmayspaint 09-15-2013 07:58 AM

Smooth finished, sealed concrete like you are describing is difficult to finish. Any paint or epoxy product will fail to bond if the surface is not prepared properly.
Many DIY floor coating systems call for acid etching as prep. With the kind of floor you are describing, that won't be enough to properly etch the concrete so it can accept a coating. Acid will etch concrete to an extent, but does nothing to sealers.

Diamond grinding or shot blasting is the only way to insure a coatings success on such a surface. Grinding machines can be rented for 2-300$ a day. In my experience, an average two car garage takes about a day to grind. Washing with a degreaser to remove oil residue is also a good idea.

jeffnc 09-15-2013 08:02 AM

From the adpolymers instructions:

"We understand not all garage floors are the same so not one preparation method will work the same and provide the same results expected from an industrial coating system. However, our instructions are set up for most floor types which includes the preparation process of acid etching. If you have a sealed floor the acid-etch solution will not penetrate so renting a grinder is recommended."

Gymschu 09-15-2013 08:06 AM

Good stuff JMays and JeffNC. I sometimes forget how complicated concrete can be to finish. It is one of those materials that is always changing with age. It gets harder for one which means grinding is absolutely necessary. That's what makes this business so difficult at times.

Startingover 09-15-2013 11:12 AM

oh wow. This may be much, much more complex and difficult that I expected.

It sounds like I'd be better off with some kind of garage tiles.

thanks for the warnings everyone.

PS Jeffnc, I didn't see a green on that site. Wonder why.

jeffnc 09-15-2013 11:54 AM

They have a green

http://www.adpolymers.com/colors_blends

nvrfinished 12-09-2013 02:17 PM

I learned the hard way about coating a garage floor at my first home. I had some sort of sealer on the floor and used an acid etch. Turns out an acid etch is only good for bare concrete and won't work on a sealer. When I put down the epoxy it started peeling up a week later when I drove on it.

I eventually hired someone to grind it all off back to bare concrete and tried it again. 5 years later when we sold the home the epoxy still looked good.


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