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Old 03-12-2013, 05:19 PM   #1
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painting furniture WELL


I have a stool purchased from a retail store that has a satin black finish on it.
The finish is completely consistent and super durable.
How come when I paint a piece of furniture, or anything for that matter,
the finish is no where near as durable? I just painted some trim with high quality oil paint, but I can still indent the paint with my fingernail. ??
Which is exactly what I was trying to avoid by using oil paint in the first place. How do I get that super hard, super consistent paint job??

I know this is an incredibly general and broad topic. But latex and oil paints just aren't getting me that super nice paint job i'm looking for.

Thanks
Brian

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Old 03-12-2013, 05:36 PM   #2
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painting furniture WELL


How long has it been since you painted it? I bet if you stop sticking your fingernail in it it won't indent, lol.

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Old 03-12-2013, 06:27 PM   #3
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Chances are the factory finish was a special sprayed on lacquer. It dries fast and can be recoated almost immediately. Hard finish, sometimes brittle.
Your paint coats will take 2-3 weeks to cure to full hardness. Some of the new paints perform wonderfully- but you have to give them the time to cure.
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:21 PM   #4
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I would love to start learning to spray on finishes.
Is this what the hvlp guns are used for?
What are some good sources for lacquer paints.
I'm guessing home depot and the like dont carry
lacquers-besides canned spray paints.

Thanks for the input!
Brian
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:24 PM   #5
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When you say "lacquer"do you literally mean the lacquer that is the secretion of the lac insect, or is it a more general term for many types of paints?
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:40 PM   #6
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I have a Wagner HVLP gun and I love it. The others are right re oil. Takes a long time to really harden up.
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:35 PM   #7
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There are true (bug) laqs and chemical laqs. The world of spray lacquers is big and has many variables.
I don't spray much so I can't clue you in, but if you talk to someone from a cabinet shop they can .
And no- the box stores are not the place to get into high end finishes.
Shirwin Williams is a good source- go hang at the counter and talk shop with them.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:04 PM   #8
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Cool. Thanks!
At least now I know what direction to look to educate myself!
I'm gonna go get me an hvlp gun and see how many pieces
of furniture I can ruin before getting the finish i'm looking for.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:53 AM   #9
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A hard, durable lacquer would be a pigmented precatalyzed lacquer or a two-part conversion varnish. These are not usually recommended for the DIY market and are best prefessionally-applied. If you are not finishing a grand piano, use a polyurethane brushable enamel. A polyurethane gives paint that extra toughness I think you are looking for. As stated above, allow several weeks for new paint to achieve its full hardness.
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Old 03-13-2013, 10:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Paint View Post
A hard, durable lacquer would be a pigmented precatalyzed lacquer or a two-part conversion varnish. These are not usually recommended for the DIY market and are best prefessionally-applied. If you are not finishing a grand piano, use a polyurethane brushable enamel. A polyurethane gives paint that extra toughness I think you are looking for. As stated above, allow several weeks for new paint to achieve its full hardness.

well... i would like to learn how to apply these paints. I have built a lot
of furniture in my days, but have always stuck to stains, polys, and
sometimes water based. All with pretty good results. But I need to expand
my skills. Any resources you could recommend? Books, dvd's, sites??
I have used polyurethane paint before. It did come out nice and durable. But i'm looking for more options.
Thanks
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:39 AM   #11
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Applying traditional latex wall and trim paints to weight-bearing surfaces (furniture, bookcases, desktops, table tops, etc.) often results in "blocking", as these films do not cure very hard. Oil-based (alkyd) paints - although they take some time to dry, are very durable, as are lacquers.
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Old 03-19-2013, 11:24 AM   #12
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If you're not spraying and you're looking for the best possible finish, in my opinion, get your hands on BM's Advance paint. My first time using it was for trim and while it applied beautifully, there wasn't a lot of surface area to really gauge how it might perform over a larger area..

I've recently painted and glazed a cabinet sample for a homeowner. The only door front I had handy was a junky oak one. I used gesso to fill the grain (I wouldn't do this for the job, this is only to nail down the look - Brushing Putty will be my choice when I tackle this), sanded, skipped primer for the sample, and went right to brushing on Advance Satin.

I sanded and tack clothed for the second coat and it only got better. It will take some time to cure, of course, but what I have is a beautiful finish that was brushed on. I kid you not when I tell you there is not a brush stroke to be found. If someone showed me this sample, I would insist it had to have been sprayed.

If you're interesting in learning to spray, no, do not go to the big box stores for materials. Use a real paint store and they will assist you every step of the way. If I'm interpreting your posts right, it sounds like Fine Paints of Europe's Hollandlac is what you might want to check into.

If someone has used "latex" wall paint for something like a bookshelf or a dresser top, you can get around the blocking issue by sprinkling on some talcum powder and wiping it off.

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