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Old 08-05-2011, 05:10 PM   #1
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Painting factory primed interior doors


The walls and the trim are the same color (flat and semi). There are new interior doors that are only factory primed. My question is what is the best route to go. The first door I used the flat paint as a first coat and it went on well, no runs or drips and dried quickly. I have not yet put the semi on it. I have about 11 of these to do in the upstairs. Would I be better off doing two coats of semi?? or since the flat goes on without visable problems and then top coat with the semi?????? I flatted out the existing trim while cutting in the walls and the semi covered well with one coat. I am working over builder paint, textured walls (and what a pain to cut in the textured walls!!!!!!!!!!!, I had to do up down, up down to get good coverage on all the cut in), (this will be another thread )

Bottom line, what is the best way to paint factory primed interior doors??

Thanks Joe, Chrispen and BrushJockey in advance.

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Old 08-05-2011, 05:52 PM   #2
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Painting factory primed interior doors


You again. Sand the doors and do two semi coats. There is no difference in labor, but there will be a difference in outcome. Two coats of semi will have greater brilliance than one over flat. Do a sample and see if it matters to you.

BTW, who is Chrispen?

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Old 08-05-2011, 06:07 PM   #3
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Painting factory primed interior doors


This is not a good question, but I will ask it anyway. This is a rental. If it were a "custom job" this is another issue. I do want to have a good final product but the time sanding, unless you have a good fast method of sanding??? My work is inportant to me. When you are given a large amount of work to be done by a specific date what can you do??

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Old 08-05-2011, 06:19 PM   #4
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Painting factory primed interior doors


What type of doors are these M? Are they flush or six paneled, what? Factory prime is usually flat, so I'm not sure that bonding would be a problem if you didn't sand. Besides, flat won't bond to gloss either. Gloss will bond to flat, but not vice versa. It's the sheen itself, not the paint type. You could have a bonding primer tinted to the trim color, or get a trim enamel with bonding properties. Finnaren & Haley makes a semi called All Grip, I believe. There are some, you just have to find them. When you say you have eleven doors, is that eleven both sides?
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Old 08-05-2011, 06:37 PM   #5
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Painting factory primed interior doors


Six Panel, 11 more to go both sides and new casings. The casings are another issue, seems they used a composit also factory primed rather than the usual "real wood" that comes with a prehung door. Should I be worried about bonding over the factory prime?? I do want to do a good job and being a rental the property manager will only go so far as to allow materials and time for the job.

Just as a note to shed my frustrations about this job. All the doors in a six bedroom, four bath home were replaced, the old casings reused and never nailed down to the jambs, nailed to the studs yes, but not the jambs. What a pain. Thank the powers that be I have a nail gun and compressor. Lots of caulk later, and the previous contractor had no idea what a 1/4" reveil is. Some of the casings are below the jambs on the tops. This is not a cheap home either. I just am soooooo happy they did not replace the closet doors
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Old 08-05-2011, 06:54 PM   #6
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Painting factory primed interior doors


As I said, factory prime is usually flat. I would take a sanding pole head with a piece of 150 and run it over the flats of each door. </=1 minute per door, less time than we spent talking about it.
Personally, I would slather the finish right over, but I'll be flamed for recommending you do that.
You can only care for someone else's stuff so much, and apparently you care more than the owner does. When in Rome!
BTW, 11 doors both sides is counted as 22 doors. 11 doors both sides, each painted twice, is 44 doors. You have 22 doors to sand, and 44 doors to apply one coat to.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:25 PM   #7
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Painting factory primed interior doors


Most of what JS said- but I'd do a coat of Zin 123 ( thinned a bit) . Most pre prime sucks like a sponge. This will set up for a good finish. I assume all is near white?

As far as applying, some like to use a weenie roller an backbrush, on 6 panel i just brush. You'll get the hang of it after 11 doors! Short of spraying don't know how to make it quicker.
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Old 08-05-2011, 07:50 PM   #8
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Painting factory primed interior doors


go ahead, thank everyone else in advance. i feel that two coats of semi would be a more durable finish since the resin content goes up as the gloss increases in paints. but who cares what i think.

joe- i may need to have you to crunch some numbers for me on some doors too. im not sure if all of my doors have both sides so i will have to look first. im looking at one of my doors now and im almost positive that it has both sides on it.
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Old 08-05-2011, 08:34 PM   #9
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Painting factory primed interior doors


m i like to prime factory prime doors and case work,but i get that its a rental. and in this case would just put 2 coats of pr 200 semi or super paint semi .if this doors are masonite 6 panel with the grain texture you can bang these doors out quick, the reason i would skip the flat paint on the doors and casework is when your flying thru these doors any holidays will be covered by 2 coats semi. on doors i like to loosen door knobs about 1/4/inch and paint around them don't forget the radio and rock out
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:10 PM   #10
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Painting factory primed interior doors


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go ahead, thank everyone else in advance. i feel that two coats of semi would be a more durable finish since the resin content goes up as the gloss increases in paints. but who cares what i think.

joe- i may need to have you to crunch some numbers for me on some doors too. im not sure if all of my doors have both sides so i will have to look first. im looking at one of my doors now and im almost positive that it has both sides on it.
For painting purposes, a door has only one side, and either a heel (hinged edge) or toe. A room with one entry door and one closet door (if inside of closet door is to be painted), counts as three doors, not two doors. When I price I count those as six doors, three doors, two coats--six doors times the rate per door. Think about it. When you paint a window, do you paint both sides? What if the doors are bare and new, hung on existing painted frames? Nine doors, six frames, simple. (Or twelve doors, eight frames) Paint one side of one door two coats and you just painted two doors, simple. Both sides of a door are not always painted at the same time, or with the same color. To count both sides of a door as one door can get confusing. That's the way I was taught, it was later reinforced by my foreman when I was an apprentice, and it just stuck. It's more logical language IMO. I need simple.
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:17 PM   #11
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Painting factory primed interior doors


M, ltd made a good point. If the doors are the textured type, you could blast them with a whizz. Brush the bevels of the panels, cut the hardware, and whizz the flats/edges. Looks bootyfull. Hell, it's a rental, if they're smooth use a mohair or 5/16th's and give them a uniform factory looking finish. Again, bootyfull. You'll have all 44 doors done in no time, especially if you have an advance guy doing the brush work.
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:25 PM   #12
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Painting factory primed interior doors


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For painting purposes, a door has only one side, and either a heel (hinged edge) or toe. A room with one entry door and one closet door (if inside of closet door is to be painted), counts as three doors, not two doors. When I price I count those as six doors, three doors, two coats--six doors times the rate per door. Think about it. When you paint a window, do you paint both sides? What if the doors are bare and new, hung on existing painted frames? Nine doors, six frames, simple. (Or twelve doors, eight frames) Paint one side of one door two coats and you just painted two doors, simple. Both sides of a door are not always painted at the same time, or with the same color. To count both sides of a door as one door can get confusing. That's the way I was taught, it was later reinforced by my foreman when I was an apprentice, and it just stuck. It's more logical language IMO. I need simple.
got it. just doing a play on words. we do the same with bridge girders. span #, girder#, which wall/flange/brace of a girder and so on. i did look and confirmed that all of the doors in my house do have both sides except one
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:45 PM   #13
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Painting factory primed interior doors


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got it. just doing a play on words. we do the same with bridge girders. span #, girder#, which wall/flange/brace of a girder and so on. i did look and confirmed that all of the doors in my house do have both sides except one
That must be the door to nowhere. There's a nether region behind where no one goes, so it doesn't need to be painted. If I used my count/price method, I wouldn't have overcharged you.
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Old 08-05-2011, 10:35 PM   #14
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Painting factory primed interior doors


I didn't see the type of paint yer using but if it's a latex enamel, you certainly don't want to sand between coats unless you are going to wait about a month for it to harden. All it'll do is ball up under the sandpaper giving you one hellva mess. We use a 2 coat system of full gloss latex with no sanding between coats. We allow each coat to dry over night. We will use a 4" Purdy synthetic bristle brush to apply it as thin as possible. We don't worry about it completely covering the first coat.

In regards to the textured walls. We have heavy textured ceilings and medium textured walls here. The newer homes will have a Monterrey knock down texture. So that we can cut a straight line at the ceiling or at corners of walls where the color or finish might change, we caulk the joint and finger it smooth so we have an area of about 1/4" that we can get a clean line on. It also helps around here to avoid the usual ceiling /wall cracks. The PI around here is in some places near 100 with vertical displacement of 16" of nasty, heaving soil.
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Old 08-05-2011, 10:44 PM   #15
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Painting factory primed interior doors


[quote=TrapperL;701290] The PI around here is in some places near 100 with vertical displacement of 16" of nasty, heaving soil. maybe ive had one too many bloody mary's but i think i got lost at this point.

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